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Children & Juvenile book


Most valuable Children & Juvenile books

Curious what the most valuable and expensive children & juvenile books are? Below is a small sample of some of the most expensive books that have sold on Biblio.co.uk:


Recent Arrivals in Children & Juvenile

Children & Juvenile

Even if you never were a Harry Potter fan, or never read C.S. Lewis, you are sure to find something timeless, instructive, and entertaining here! Established juvenile classics like To Kill a Mockingbird share space with new ones like The Hunger Games. For the little ones you'll see illustrated classics, nursery rhymes and more! As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.co.uk, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.



Top Sellers in Children & Juvenile

    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee, that tells a story similar to something the author experienced as a child. The book follows three years in the life of Scout Finch, her brother Jem, their father Atticus, and their town of Maycomb, Alabama during the Great Depression. The first half of the novel focuses on Scout and Jem's childhood, and the second part of the book is the ongoing trial of a black man accused of raping a white woman, whom Atticus has been called to defend, and the children's coming of age. Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (1961)


    Harry Potter and The Half-Blood Prince by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on 16 July 2005, is the sixth of seven novels from British author J. K. Rowling's popular Harry Potter series. Set during Harry Potter's sixth year at Hogwarts, the novel explores Lord Voldemort's past, and Harry's preparations for the final battle amidst emerging romantic relationships and the emotional confusions and conflict resolutions characteristic of mid-adolescence.


    Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

    Pride and Prejudice is a novel by Jane Austen. First published on 28 January 1813, it was her second published novel. Its manuscript was initially written between 1796 and 1797 in Steventon, Hampshire, where Austen lived in the rectory. Originally called First Impressions, it was never published under that title, and in following revisions it was retitled Pride and Prejudice. The book is narrated in free indirect speech following the main character Elizabeth Bennet as she deals with matters of upbringing, marriage, moral rightness and education in her aristocratic society. Though the book's setting is uniquely turn of the 19th century, it remains a fascination of modern readership, continuing to remain at the top of lists titled "most loved books of all time", and receiving considerable attention from literary critics. This modern interest has resulted in a number of dramatic adaptations and a plethora of books developing Austen's memorable characters further. To date, the book has sold some 20 million copies worldwide.


    Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter #1) J. K. Rowlings amazing first novel, H arry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone , was released as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in the United States. We start off by meeting Harry Potter and his horrible family. Harry is an orphan, and lives in a tiny room under the stairs, serving his family by cooking and cleaning. One day, he gets a letter from the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardy, and his life takes a serious turn! Join Harry as he explores Hogwarts, makes lasting friendships, and begins his life as an intrepid young wizard in this award-winning story! Winner of:  British Fantasy Award (1999) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , British Book Award for Children's Book of the Year (1998) , Smarties Prize (1997) , Prijs van de Nederlandse Kinderjury (2002) ...more Prijs van de Nederlandse Kinderjury (2002) , Rebecca Caudill Young Reader's Book Award (2001) , South Carolina Book Award for Junior Book Award (2001) , Grand Canyon Reader Award for Teen Book (2000) , Charlotte Award (2000) , Nene Award (2000) , Massachusetts Children's Book Award (2000) , Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2001) , Blue Hen Book Award for Chapter Book (2001) , Nevada Young Readers' Award for Young Reader Category (2000) , Sasquatch Reading Award (2000) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2000) , Indian Paintbrush Book Award (2000) , Carnegie Medal Nominee (1997) , ALA's Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults (1999)


    The Catcher In the Rye by J D Salinger

    Published in 1951, The Catcher in the Rye has become a common part of high school and college curricula throughout the English-speaking world and has been translated into all major languages. Since its publication with a $3.00 sticker, it has reportedly sold more than 65 million copies. The novel's antihero, Holden Caulfield, has become a cultural icon for teenage rebellion. Due to its liberal use of profanity and portrayal of sexuality and teenage angst, it has frequently been met with censorship challenges in the United States making it one of the most challenged books of the 20th century.


    Harry Potter and The Goblet Of Fire by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Harry Potter, #4) keeps having horrible dreams that wake him with the scar on his forehead throbbing. He is relieved to return to the magical realm from his summer break early to attend the Quidditch World Cup with the Weasleys, but the relief quickly gives way to a dark threat that looms over the magical world. Being a teenager is hard enough without having a Dark Lord seeking your destruction! Hugo Award for Best Novel (2001) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Publieksprijs voor het Nederlandse Boek (2001) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2002) , Indian Paintbrush Book Award (2002)  


    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

    Jane Eyre is a famous and influential novel by English writer Charlotte Brontë. It was published in London, England in 1847 by Smith, Elder & Co. with the title Jane Eyre. An Autobiography under the pen name "Currer Bell". (Harper & Brothers of New York came out with the American edition in 1848.)


    Alice's Adventures In Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) is a novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. It tells the story of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar and anthropomorphic creatures. The tale plays with logic in ways that have given the story lasting popularity with adults as well as children. It is considered to be one of the most characteristic examples of the genre of literary nonsense, and its narrative course and structure have been enormously influential, mainly in the fantasy genre.


    Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final of the Harry Potter novels written by British author J. K. Rowling. The book was released on 21 July 2007, ending the series that began in 1997 with the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. This book chronicles the events directly following Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2005), and leads to the long-awaited final confrontation between Harry Potter and Lord Voldemort.


    Harry Potter and The Order Of the Phoenix by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5) shows us how the plot begins to thicken in this  renowned series.  The tale grows darker and becomes psychologically intense as the teenaged boy wizard much handle his social life as well as the dark forces that seek to take him down! The greater community begins to doubt Harry and the existence of Voldemort's return, and Hogwarts is overtaken by an oppressive representative from the Ministry of Magic.  We meet the dread Dementors, and Harry loses loved ones in this tale of his exhausting fifth year! Bram Stoker Award for Works for Young Readers (2003) , Anthony Award for Young Adult (2004) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Books I Loved Best Yearly (BILBY) Awards for Older Readers (2004) , Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2006) ...more Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2006) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2005) , ALA Teens' Top Ten (2004) , Carnegie Medal Nominee (2003)


    Giver by Lois Lowry

    The Give r is a 1993 novel by Lois Lowry, set in a future society which is not quite as ideally Utopian as it first appears.  The story follows a twelve-year old boy named Jonas, who is selected to inherit all of the memories of the time before Utopia.  This ensures that there is experience to draw from in case they are ever needed to aid in decision making, but Jonas discovers just how shallow his community's world has become. Newbery Medal (1994) , British Fantasy Award (1994) , Horn Book Fanfare Best Book (1994) , Garden State Book Award for Teen Fiction Grades 6-8 (1996) , Rebecca Caudill Young Reader's Book Award (1996) ...more Rebecca Caudill Young Reader's Book Award (1996) , Grand Canyon Reader Award for Teen Book (1995) , Pacific Northwest Library Association Young Reader's Choice Award for Senior (1996)


    The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was written by Mark Twain and published in 1884. It is commonly regarded as a sequel to Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Huckleberry "Huck" Finn is the narrator of this Great American Novel, and he speaks in Southern antebellum vernacular. The vivid descriptions of people and daily life along the Mississippi River color the adventure of Huck and a runaway slave, Jim, rafting their way to freedom.


    Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

    Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontë's only novel. It was first published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, and a posthumous second edition was edited by her sister Charlotte. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the story centers (as an adjective, Wuthering is a Yorkshire word referring to turbulent weather). The narrative tells the tale of the all-encompassing and passionate, yet thwarted, love between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw, and how this unresolved passion eventually destroys them and many around them. Now considered a classic of English literature, Wuthering Heights met with mixed reviews by critics when it first appeared, mainly because of the narrative's stark depiction of mental and physical cruelty. Though Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre was originally considered the best of the Brontë sisters' works, many subsequent critics of Wuthering Heights argued that its originality and achievement made it superior. Wuthering Heights has also given rise to many adaptations and inspired works, including films, radio, television dramatisations, a musical by Bernard J. Taylor, ballet, opera, and song.


    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

    A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas (commonly known as A Christmas Carol) is a book by English author Charles Dickens, that was first published on 19 December, 1843. with illustrations by John Leech. Dickens called it his "Little Christmas Book". The first of the author's five "Christmas books," (a new literary genre created incidentally) the story was instantly successful, selling over six thousand copies in one week. Completed in six weeks under financial duress to help pay off a debt, A Christmas Carol was initially to be written in his leisure moments while writing the more grave work Martin Chuzzlewit, but it soon claimed a place in the authors life that made its composition anything but a "leisure" task, he cried over it, he laughed over it, and friends who were with him during the closing months of 1843 have left their evidence of the power that story left over the novelist's thoughts and imagination. A Christmas Carol has become one of the most popular and enduring Christmas stories of all time. Some historians have suggested that its popularity played a significant role in redefining the importance of Christmas and the "spirit" of the holiday. English novelist William Makepeace Thackeray called it; “a national benefit, and to every man and woman who reads it a personal kindness”. "If Christmas, with its ancient and hospitable customs, its social and charitable observances, were in danger of decay, this is the book that would give them a new lease," said poet Thomas Hood. Further Christmas books, essays, and stories followed annually (except in 1847) through 1867. However, none equaled A Christmas Carol in potency. Together they represent a celebration of Christmas attempted by no other great author. In 1870, a London costermonger’s girl was heard to exclaim, “Dickens dead? Then will Father Christmas die too?” — a tribute both to Dickens' association with Christmas and the mythological status of his work. First edition copies of A Christmas Carol, with Illustrations by John Leech; London: Chapman & Hall (1843) in exceptional condition, estimated to be anywhere from $30,000 to $50,000 in value. The book has been adapted in opera, films, radio and recordings.


    Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

    Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Robert Louis Stevenson. The story was originally serialised in the children's magazine Young Folks under the title The Sea Cook over a period of several months from 1881-82. Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, Treasure Island is the classic pirate tale, known for its superb atmosphere, character and action. It is one of the most frequently dramatised of all novels. The influence of Treasure Island on popular perception of pirates is vast, including treasure maps with an "X", schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen with parrots on their shoulders. 


    A Tale Of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

    A Tale of Two Cities is a novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. With 200 million copies sold, it is the most printed original English book, the most printed and among the most famous works of fiction. It depicts the plight of the French peasantry under the oppression of the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and a number of unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same time period (hence the work's title). It follows the lives of several protagonists through these events, most notably Charles Darnay, a French once-aristocrat who falls victim to the indiscriminate wrath of the revolution despite his virtuous nature, and Sydney Carton, a dissipated British barrister who endeavors to redeem his ill-spent life out of love for Darnay's wife, Lucie Manette. The novel was published in weekly installments (not monthly, as with most of his other novels). The first installment ran in the first issue of Dickens' literary periodical All the Year Round appearing April 30, 1859; the thirty-first and final ran on November 25 of the same year.


    Hunger Games - Audio by Suzanne Collins

    The Hunger Games (2008) is a young-adult science fiction novel written by Suzanne Collins. It was originally published in hardcover on September 14, 2008 by Scholastic. It is the first book of the Hunger Games trilogy. It introduces sixteen-year-old Katniss Everdeen, who lives in a post-apocalyptic world where a powerful government called the Capitol has risen up after several devastating disasters.


    The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan

    The Pilgrim's Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come is a Christian allegory written by John Bunyan and published in February, 1678. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of English literature, has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of print.


    The Wind In the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

    The Wind in the Willows is a classic of children's literature by Kenneth Grahame, first published in 1908. Alternately slow moving and fast paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animal characters in a pastoral version of England. The novel is notable for its mixture of mysticism, adventure, morality, and camaraderie. The Wind in the Willows was in its thirty-first printing when then-famous playwright, A. A. Milne, who loved it, adapted a part of it for stage as Toad of Toad Hall in 1929. In 1908 Grahame retired from his position as secretary of the Bank of England. He moved to the country, where he spent his time by the River Thames doing much as the animal characters in his book do; namely, as one of the most famous phrases from the book says, "simply messing about in boats".


    The House On Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

    Sandra Cisneros was born in Chicago in 1954. Internationally acclaimed for her poetry and fiction, she has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Lannan Literary Award and the American Book Award, and of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the MacArthur Foundation. Cisneros is the author of the novels The House on Mango Street and Caramelo , a collection of short stories Woman Hollering Creek , a book of poetry Loose Woman , and a children's book Hairs/Pelitos . She lives in San Antonio, Texas. From the Trade Paperback edition.


    Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

    Great Expectations is a novel by Charles Dickens first serialised in All the Year Round from 1 December 1860 to August 1861. It is regarded as one of his greatest and most sophisticated novels, and is one of his most enduringly popular novels; having been adapted for stage and screen over 250 times. Great Expectations is written in the genre of "bildungsroman" or the style of book that follows the story of a man or woman in their quest for maturity, usually starting from childhood and ending in the main character's eventual adulthood. Great Expectations is the story of the orphan Pip, writing his life from his early days of childhood until adulthood and trying to be a gentleman along the way. The story can also be considered semi-autobiographical of Dickens, like much of his work, drawing on his experiences of life and people. The action of the story takes place from Christmas Eve, 1812, when the protagonist is about seven years old, to the winter of 1840. Each installment in All the Year Round contained two chapters and was written in a way that kept readers interested from week to week, while still satisfying their curiosity at the end of each one. Its first appearance in volume form was as three-volume novel, without illustrations, in July 1861.


    The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, is a popular 1876 novel about a young boy growing up in the antebellum South on the Mississippi River in the town of St. Petersberg, based on the town of Hannibal, Missouri.


    The Outsiders by S E Hinton

    In Hinton's story, The Outsiders, the main character Ponyboy tells us that there are two kinds of people in the world: greasers and socs. Those who are poor and on the outside, and those who have more than they could ever use. Ponyboy struggles with the legal heat, the emotional backlash of being unacceptable to society, and maintaining the tough facadé necessary to keep alive. Ponyboy and the other greasers maintain their struggle with the soc gangs until the game finally gets too hot and someone gets killed. Books I Loved Best Yearly (BILBY) Awards for Secondary (1991)


    The Lion, the Witch and The Wardrobe by C S Lewis

    The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia #1) by C.S. Lewis has delighted children and adults alike since it was published in 1950. We learn about the Pevensie siblings: Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy, who find themselves sent off to a creepy, old house to protect them from the bombings of London in WWII.  As they begin to explore their new home, young Lucy finds a secret in the house, and a doorway into a wonderful fantasy world! 


Children & Juvenile Books & Ephemera


    Catching Fire by Collins, Suzanne

    By winning the annual Hunger Games, District 12 tributes Katniss Everdeen and Peeta Mellark have secured a life of safety and plenty for themselves and their families, but because they won by defying the rules, they unwittingly become the faces of an impending rebellion.


    Mockingjay by Collins, Suzanne

    Mockingjay is the upcoming third, and final, installment of The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins. It is set for release on August 24, 2010. The novel is preceded by 2008's The Hunger Games and 2009's Catching Fire.


    Artemis Fowl by Colfer, Eoin

    Twelve-year-old villain, Artemis Fowl, is the most ingenious criminal mastermind in history. His bold and daring plan is to hold a leprechaun to ransom. But he's taking on more than he bargained for when he kidnaps Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon (Lower Elements Police Reconnaissance Unit). For a start, leprechaun technology is more advanced than our own. Add to that the fact that Holly is a true heroine and that her senior officer Commander Root will stop at nothing to get her back and you've got the mother of all sieges brewing!


    New Moon by Meyer, Stephenie

    "Megan Tingley books."


    Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There by Carroll, Lewis

    Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871) is a work of children's literature by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson), generally categorized as literary nonsense. It is the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865). Although it makes no reference to the events in the earlier book, the themes and settings of Through the Looking-Glass make it a kind of mirror image of Wonderland: the first book begins outdoors, in the warm month of May, on Alice's birthday (May 4), uses frequent changes in size as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of playing cards; the second opens indoors on a snowy, wintry night exactly six months later, on November 4 (the day before Guy Fawkes Night), uses frequent changes in time and spatial directions as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of chess. In it, there are many mirror themes, including opposites, time running backwards, and so on.


    Eldest by Paolini, Christopher

    Eldest is the second book in the Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini and the sequel to Eragon. Eldest was first published in hardcover on August 23, 2005, and was released in paperback in September 2006. Eldest has been released in an audiobook format, and as an ebook. Like Eragon, Eldest became a New York Times bestseller. A deluxe edition of Eldest was released on September 26, 2006, including new information and art by both the illustrator and the author. Other editions of Eldest are translations into different languages. Eldest begins following several important events in Eragon. The story is the continued adventures of Eragon and his dragon Saphira, centering around their journey to the realm of the Elves in order to further Eragon's training as a Dragon Rider. Other plots in the story focus on Roran, Eragon's cousin, who leads the inhabitants of Carvahall to Surda, and Nasuada as she takes on her father's role as leader of the Varden. Eldest ends at the Battle of the Burning Plains, where Eragon faces a new Dragon Rider, and a new dragon, Thorn. Reviews pointed out the similarities between Eldest and other works such as The Lord of the Rings, while praising the themes of the book, such as friendship and honor. Several of these reviews commented on the style and genre of Eldest, while others considered the possibility of a movie adaptation similar to the movie of Eragon.


    Bobbsey Twins At Cedar Camp by Hope, Laura Lee



    Zo? E's Cats by Stokes, Zoe



    The Friends Of Van by Spender, Brenda E



    The Bobbsey Twins At the County Fair by Hope, Laura Lee



    Donna Parker by Martin, Marcia



    Mr Men & Little Miss by Hargreaves, Roger



    Little Cat Lost by MacKenzie, Compton



    Biffel - the Story Of a Trek-Ox by Hyatt, Stanley Portal



    A Child's Book Of Saints by Canton, W



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