English Fiction

From Pride and Prejudice to Animal Farm, from The Vicar Of Wakefield to English Traits, we can help you find the english fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.co.uk, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Top Sellers in English Fiction

Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice

by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice is the second novel by English author Jane Austen, after Sense and Sensibility. First published on 28 January 1813, Austen sold the copyright for just £110.  Its manuscript was initially written between 1796 and 1797 in Steventon, Hampshire, where Austen lived in the rectory. Originally called First Impressions, it was never published under that title, and in following revisions it was retitled Pride and Prejudice. It was first published anonymously. A... Read more about this item
Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

by Charlotte Bronte

Jane Eyre is a famous and influential novel by the English writer Charlotte Brontë. It was published in London, England in 1847 by Smith, Elder & Co. with the title Jane Eyre, an Autobiography under the pen name "Currer Bell". Orphaned as a child, Jane felt like an outcast during her childhood. She was sent by her cruel aunt to a boarding school where she was met with further torment. After the devastating loss of a friend, she finds herself enrolled under a new headmaster at the Lowood School... Read more about this item
Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

by Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel, Through
the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, tell the story of a young
girl in a fantasy world filled with peculiar, anthropomorphic
creatures. The classic tale of literary nonsense takes the reader on an
exploration of logic and absurdities. The Alice books — sometimes
combined or referred to with the abbreviated title Alice in Wonderland —
have been translated into at least 97 languages with over a hundred
different editions.... Read more about this item
Ulysses

Ulysses

by James Joyce

Ulysses is a modernist novel by James Joyce. It was first
serialized in The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920 and later
published by Shakespeare and Company in 1922. Originally, Joyce conceived of
Ulysses as a short story to be included in Dubliners, but decided instead to
publish it as a long novel, situated as a sort of sequel to A Portrait of the
Artist as a Young Man, picking up Stephen Dedalus’s life over a year later.
Ulysses takes place on a single day, June 16, 1904, in Dublin -... Read more about this item
The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

by F Scott Fitzgerald

Written in 1925, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is widely
considered to be one of the author’s greatest works. Set in New York City and
Long Island during the Roaring Twenties, the focus of the story is (of course)
its title character, Jay Gatsby, and his unswerving desire to be reunited with
Daisy Buchanan, the love he lost five years earlier. However, Nick Carraway,
who happens to be both Gatsby’s neighbor and Daisy’s cousin, narrates Gatsby's journey
from poverty to wealth, into the... Read more about this item
Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

by Emily Bronte

Wuthering Heights, the only book written by Emily Brontë, and originally published in 1847 by Thomas Cautley Newby under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, is a classic work of English literature. The Brontë sisters are known for classical and important literature, such as Jane Eyre (by Charlotte Brontë) and Agnes Grey (by Anne Brontë). The first edition of Wuthering Heights was first published in three volumes, the first two composed of Wuthering Heights, with the third volume containing Anne... Read more about this item
A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol

by Charles Dickens

The full title of Charles Dickens' most famous work is technically A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost-Story of Christmas. This novella was published on December 19, 1843, and the first edition run of 6000 copies were sold out by Christmas Eve of that year. The publication of the first edition was fraught with complications, and even though the book was received to positive reviews, profits of the book fell far below Dickens' expectations, and the financial strain caused rifts between Dickens and... Read more about this item
A Tale Of Two Cities

A Tale Of Two Cities

by Charles Dickens

Written by Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities is a historical novel that follows Manette, a French doctor imprisoned for 18 long years in Paris’s Bastille. Following his release, he goes to live in London with his daughter Lucie, who had never met him and believed him to be dead. Set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution and Reign of Terror, A Tale of Two Cities is a fictitious story that falls both into the historical and adventure genres. The famous book is one of the... Read more about this item
The Pilgrim's Progress

The Pilgrim's Progress

by John Bunyan

The Pilgrim's Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come is a Christian allegory written by John Bunyan and published in February, 1678. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of English literature, has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of print.
Treasure Island

Treasure Island

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Robert Louis Stevenson. The story was originally serialised in the children's magazine Young Folks under the title The Sea Cook over a period of several months from 1881-82.Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, Treasure Island is the classic pirate tale, known for its superb atmosphere, character and action. It is one of the most frequently dramatised of all novels. The influence of Treasure Island on popular perception of... Read more about this item
Nineteen Eighty-Four

Nineteen Eighty-Four

by George Orwell

Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) by George
Orwell has become the definitive dystopian novel of the twentieth
century. Originally published on June 8, 1949 by Secker and
Warburg in the United Kingdom, the book follows the main character,
Winston Smith, through his disillusionment with totalitarianism and a
doomed struggle of resistance. George Orwell is a pen-name, Orwell's
real name was Eric Blair. -
Great Expectations

Great Expectations

by Charles Dickens

Great Expectations is a classic novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1861. It tells the story of Pip, a young orphan boy brought up by his abusive sister and her blacksmith husband in rural England. Pip dreams of becoming a gentleman and escaping poverty, but his life takes a dramatic turn when he receives a large fortune from an anonymous benefactor. As he rises in society, he becomes involved with a host of colorful characters, including the eccentric Miss Havisham and her adopted daughter Estella,... Read more about this item
The Canterbury Tales

The Canterbury Tales

by Geoffrey Chaucer

Geoffrey Chaucer was born in London, the son of a wine-merchant, in about 1342, and as he spent his life in royal government service his career happens to be unusually well documented. By 1357 Chaucer was a page to the wife of Prince Lionel, second son of Edward III, and it was while in the prince's service that Chaucer was ransomed when captured during the English campaign in France in 1359-60. Chaucer's wife Philippa, whom he married c. 1365, was the sister of Katherine Swynford, the mistress (c.... Read more about this item
Brideshead Revisited

Brideshead Revisited

by Evelyn Waugh

Author Evelyn Waugh wrote Brideshead Revisited: The
Sacred & Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder during the handful of
months following a minor parachute accident. Loosely based on Waugh’s own
experiences as a student at Oxford University, the novel tells the story of Charles
Ryder, a young man at Oxford who is captivated by an eccentric classmate named Sebastian
Flyte and his very wealthy, Catholic family. The first half of the book is
filled with teachings of beauty, booze, and witty... Read more about this item
Dracula

Dracula

by Bram Stoker

Dracula is a gothic horror book written by Bram Stoker and published in 1897. The story is told through a series of journal entries, letters, and newspaper articles, and it follows the efforts of a group of people led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing to defeat the vampire Count Dracula.Dracula by Bram Stoker has been attributed to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel, and invasion literature. It has become a cultural icon, spawning countless adaptations in... Read more about this item
Gulliver's Travels

Gulliver's Travels

by Jonathan Swift

Gulliver's Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of several Ships, is a novel by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the "travellers' tales" literary sub-genre. It is Swift's best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature. The book became tremendously popular as soon as it was published.
Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

by Jane Austen

Sense and Sensibility is a novel by the English novelist Jane Austen. Published in 1811, it was Austen's first published novel, which she wrote under the pseudonym "A Lady". The story revolves around Elinor and Marianne, two daughters of Mr. Dashwood by his second wife. They have a younger sister, Margaret, and an older half-brother named John. When their father dies, the family estate passes to John, and the Dashwood women are left in reduced circumstances.
Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

by Sir Walter Scott

Published in 1820 by author Sir Walter Scott, Ivanhoe is an influential historical romance novel set in medieval England. Ivanhoe represents a departure from Scott’s other novels, and remains his most well-known work. Scott explores many different themes in Ivanhoe, chief among them the rivalry and tension between the Saxons and Normans, feudal injustice as well as the oppression of England’s Jewish communities at the time.Critical reception was very positive at the time of publication, and Scott is... Read more about this item
Emma

Emma

by Jane Austen

Emma is a novel by Jane Austen, published in 1815. The story follows the life of Emma Woodhouse, a wealthy and beautiful young woman who lives in the English countryside. Emma fancies herself as a matchmaker and sets out to find a suitable husband for her friend Harriet Smith. However, her attempts to play cupid lead to several misadventures, including a love triangle involving her own romantic interests. As the story unfolds, Emma learns important lessons about humility, love, and the consequences of... Read more about this item
Paradise Lost

Paradise Lost

by John Milton

Paradise Lost is an epic poem written by John Milton, first published in 1667. Set against the backdrop of Adam and Eve's fall from grace in the Garden of Eden, the poem explores complex themes of sin, free will, and the nature of evil. Milton skillfully crafts vivid imagery and powerful metaphors to depict Satan's rebellion against God, his subsequent expulsion from heaven, and his relentless pursuit of revenge. The narrative follows the interplay between God, Satan, and mankind, with Milton's eloquent... Read more about this item
The Picture Of Dorian Gray

The Picture Of Dorian Gray

by Oscar Wilde

"The Picture of Dorian Gray" is a classic novel by Oscar Wilde, first published in 1890. It tells the story of a young, handsome man named Dorian Gray, who becomes the subject of a portrait painted by an artist named Basil Hallward. Dorian is introduced to the pleasures of life by his friend, Lord Henry Wotton, who encourages him to pursue beauty and pleasure above all else.Dorian becomes obsessed with his own youth and beauty, and he wishes that his portrait would age instead of him. His wish is... Read more about this item
All the King's Men

All the King's Men

by Robert Penn Warren

All the King's Men is a novel by Robert Penn Warren, first published in 1946. The novel's title is drawn from the nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty. In 1947 Warren won the Pulitzer Prize for All the King's Men. It was adapted for film in 1949 and 2006; the 1949 version won the Academy Award for Best Picture.
Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe

by Daniel Defoe

Robinson Crusoe was first published in April 1719, in London. In the beginning, the story was published as an autobiography, but it was later established that the author was Daniel Defoe. The novel became an instant classic, with four editions printed in the first year of publication. Often called the first English novel, it follows the story of Robinson Crusoe, a man marooned on an island. Crusoe’s adventure-packed story of survival started the genre of realistic fiction and inspired a slew of other... Read more about this item
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Animal Farm

by George Orwell

Animal Farm is a dystopian novella by George Orwell. Published in England on 17 August 1945, the book reflects events leading up to and during the Stalin era before World War II. Orwell, a democratic socialist and a member of the Independent Labour Party for many years, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and was suspicious of Moscow-directed Stalinism after his experiences with the NKVD during the Spanish Civil War.

English Fiction Books & Ephemera

The Vicar Of Wakefield

The Vicar Of Wakefield

by Goldsmith, Oliver

"The greatest object in the universe, says a certain philosopher, is a good man struggling with adversity." When Dr Primrose loses his fortune in a disastrous investment, his idyllic life in the country is shattered and he is forced to move with his wife and six children to an impoverished living on the estate of Squire Thornhill. Taking to the road in pursuit of his daughter, who has been seduced by the rakish Squire, the beleaguered Primrose becomes embroiled in a series of misadventures –... Read more about this item
The Mayor Of Casterbridge

The Mayor Of Casterbridge

by Hardy, Thomas

THOMAS HARDY was born on June 2, 1840. His father was a stonemason. He was brought up near Dorchester and trained as an architect. In 1868 his work took him to St Juliot's church in Cornwall where he met his wife-to-be, Emma. His first novel, The Poor Man and the Lady, was rejected by publishers but Desperate Remedies was published in 1871 and this was rapidly followed by Under the Greenwood Tree (1872), A Pair of Blue Eyes (1873) and Far from the Madding Crowd (1874). He also wrote many other novels,... Read more about this item
Shakespearean Tragedy

Shakespearean Tragedy

by Bradley, A C

"A.C. Bradley put Shakespeare on the map for generations of readers and students for whom the plays might not otherwise have become 'real' at all" writes John Bayley in his foreword to this edition of Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear and Macbeth. Approaching the tragedies as drama, wondering about their characters as he might have wondered about people in novels or in life, Bradley is one of the most liberating in the line of distinguished Shakespeare critics. His... Read more about this item
Hamlet

Hamlet

by Shakespeare, W

Middlemarch

Middlemarch

by G, Eliot

Cambridge History Of English Literature

Cambridge History Of English Literature

by Ward, A W, and A R Waller

Shakespeare Survey

Shakespeare Survey

by Nicoll, Allardyce

English Traits

English Traits

by Emerson, Ralph Waldo