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Australian Fiction

From On the Beach to The Colonists, from Poor Fellow My Country to The Family Frying Pan, we can help you find the australian fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.co.uk, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.


Top Sellers in Australian Fiction

    On the Beach by Nevil Shute

    "The most shocking fiction I have read in years. What is shocking about it is both the idea and the sheer imaginative brilliance with which Mr. Shute brings it off."THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLEThey are the last generation, the innocent victims of an accidental war, living out their last days, making do with what they have, hoping for a miracle. As the deadly rain moves ever closer, the world as we know it winds toward an inevitable end....From the Paperback edition.


    Beyond the Black Stump by Nevil Shute

    Beyond the Black Stump is a novel by British author Nevil Shute. It was first published in the UK by William Heinemann Ltd in 1956.  If somewhere is 'beyond the black stump' it means it is in the deepest darkest wilds of the Australian outback. This is the sun-baked setting for Nevil Shute's novel of a romance that is tested by the differences between two young people's home lives. Stanton Laird is sent from his small town in America to work in a remote outpost in Western Australia. While out there he befriends the unconventional Regan family and falls in love with the daughter Mollie. However, when Mollie travels to America to visit him the couple realize that their differences in background make their plans for a future together hard to realize.


    A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute

    A Town Like Alice is a novel by the Australian author Nevil Shute. It tells the story of Jean Paget; as a prisoner of war in Malaya during World War II and then her return to Malaya after the war where she discovers something that leads her on the search for romance and to a small outback community in Australia where she sets out to turn it into 'a town like Alice'. It was first published in 1950 when Shute had newly settled in Australia.


    Round the Bend by Nevil Shute

    NEVIL SHUTE NORWAY was born on January 17, 1899 in Ealing, London. After attending the Dragon School and Shrewsbury School, he studied Engineering Science at Balliol College, Oxford. He worked as an aeronautical engineer and published his first novel, Marazan , in 1926. In 1931 he married Frances Mary Heaton and they went on to have two daughters. During the Second World War he joined the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve where he worked on developing secret weapons. After the war he continued to write and settled in Australia where he lived until his death on January 12, 1960. His most celebrated novels include Pied Piper (1942), No Highway (1948), A Town Like Alice (1950) and On the Beach (1957).


    The Far Country by Nevil Shute

    A young English woman leaves her aging parents to visit friends living in the Australian outback. She falls in love, both with the country and with Carl, a doctor and Czech refugee. Brought together through dramatic encounters and strange twists of fate, their relationship hangs in the balance when Jennifer is called back to England.


    An Old Captivity by Nevil Shute

    An Old Captivity is a novel by British author Nevil Shute. It was first published in the UK in 1940 by William Heinemann. It was also published under the alternative title "Vinland the Good".


    No Highway by Nevil Shute

    NEVIL SHUTE NORWAY was born on January 17, 1899 in Ealing, London. After attending the Dragon School and Shrewsbury School, he studied Engineering Science at Balliol College, Oxford. He worked as an aeronautical engineer and published his first novel, Marazan , in 1926. In 1931 he married Frances Mary Heaton and they went on to have two daughters. During the Second World War he joined the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve where he worked on developing secret weapons. After the war he continued to write and settled in Australia where he lived until his death on January 12, 1960. His most celebrated novels include Pied Piper (1942), No Highway (1948), A Town Like Alice (1950) and On the Beach (1957).


    Voss by Patrick White

    PATRICK WHITE (1912-1990), an Australian novelist and playwright, won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1973. His novel The Vivisector was shortlisted for the Lost Man Booker Prize in 2010.


    Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts

    Gregory David Roberts penned Shantaram as a mostly autobiographical novel. Shantaram is the name given to the main character, Mr. Lindsay Ford, also known as Linbaba. Ford is a convicted Australian bank robber and heroin addict who escaped and made his way to Mumbai, planning on leaving for Germany, but ends up staying and setting up a free health clinic in the slums, staying for over 10 years.


    Marazan by Nevil Shute

    Marazan is the first published novel by British author, Nevil Shute. It was first published in 1926 by Cassell & Co, then republished in 1951 by William Heinemann.


    People Of the Book by Geraldine Brooks

    The "complex and moving"( The New Yorker ) novel by Pulitzer Prize-winner Geraldine Brooks follows a rare manuscript through centuries of exile and war Inspired by a true story, People of the Book is a novel of sweeping historical grandeur and intimate emotional intensity by an acclaimed and beloved author. Called "a tour de force"by the San Francisco Chronicle , this ambitious, electrifying work traces the harrowing journey of the famed Sarajevo Haggadah, a beautifully illuminated Hebrew manuscript created in fifteenth-century S pain. When it falls to Hanna Heath, an Australian rare-book expert, to conserve this priceless work, the series of tiny artifacts she discovers in its ancient binding-an insect wing fragment, wine stains, salt crystals, a white hair-only begin to unlock its deep mysteries and unexpectedly plunges Hanna into the intrigues of fine art forgers and ultra-nationalist fanatics.


    Most Secret by Nevil Shute

    NEVIL SHUTE NORWAY was born on January 17, 1899 in Ealing, London. After attending the Dragon School and Shrewsbury School, he studied Engineering Science at Balliol College, Oxford. He worked as an aeronautical engineer and published his first novel, Marazan , in 1926. In 1931 he married Frances Mary Heaton and they went on to have two daughters. During the Second World War he joined the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve where he worked on developing secret weapons. After the war he continued to write and settled in Australia where he lived until his death on January 12, 1960. His most celebrated novels include Pied Piper (1942), No Highway (1948), A Town Like Alice (1950) and On the Beach (1957).


    March by Geraldine Brooks

    As the North reels under a series of unexpected defeats during the dark first year of the war, one man leaves behind his family to aid the Union cause. His experiences will utterly change his marriage and challenge his most ardently held beliefs. Riveting and elegant as it is meticulously researched, March is an extraordinary novel woven out of the lore of American history. From Louisa May Alcott’s beloved classic Little Women , Geraldine Brooks has taken the character of the absent father, March, who has gone off to war, leaving his wife and daughters to make do in mean times. To evoke him, Brooks turned to the journals and letters of Bronson Alcott, Louisa May’s father—a friend and confidant of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. In her telling, March emerges as an idealistic chaplain in the little known backwaters of a war that will test his faith in himself and in the Union cause as he learns that his side, too, is capable of acts of barbarism and racism. As he recovers from a near mortal illness, he must reassemble his shattered mind and body and find a way to reconnect with a wife and daughters who have no idea of the ordeals he has been through. Spanning the vibrant intellectual world of Concord and the sensuous antebellum South, March adds adult resonance to Alcott’s optimistic children’s tale to portray the moral complexity of war, and a marriage tested by the demands of extreme idealism—and by a dangerous and illicit attraction. A lushly written, wholly original tale steeped in the details of another time, March secures Geraldine Brooks’s place as an internationally renowned author of historical fiction.


    In the Wet by Nevil Shute



    Ruined City by Nevil Shute



    Man Of Two Tribes by Arthur Upfield



    The Man Who Loved Children by Christina Stead



    The Rainbow and The Rose by Nevil Shute



    Trustee From the Toolroom by Nevil Shute

    NEVIL SHUTE NORWAY was born on January 17, 1899 in Ealing, London. After attending the Dragon School and Shrewsbury School, he studied Engineering Science at Balliol College, Oxford. He worked as an aeronautical engineer and published his first novel, Marazan , in 1926. In 1931 he married Frances Mary Heaton and they went on to have two daughters. During the Second World War he joined the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve where he worked on developing secret weapons. After the war he continued to write and settled in Australia where he lived until his death on January 12, 1960. His most celebrated novels include Pied Piper (1942), No Highway (1948), A Town Like Alice (1950) and On the Beach (1957).


    Stephen Morris by Nevil Shute



    The Exiles by William Stuart Long



    The Battling Prophet by Arthur Upfield



    The Settlers by William Stuart Long



    The Colonists by William Stuart Long



Australian Fiction Books & Ephemera


    Poor Fellow My Country by Herbert, Xavier

    Poor Fellow My Country is a Miles Franklin Award winning novel by Australian author Xavier Herbert. It is the longest Australian book ever written. Primarily, it is the story of Jeremy Delacy and his illegitimate grandson Prindy in the years leading up to World War II. It covers matter on Aboriginal affairs, Australian patriotism and nationalism; subjects also dealt with in Herbert's novel Capricornia.


    The Secret River by Grenville, Kate

    The Secret River, written by Kate Grenville in 2005, is a historical fiction about an early 19th century Englishman transported to Australia for theft. The story begins with an insightful flashback to England, and goes on to explore issues surrounding the question of what might have happened when Europeans colonised land already inhabited by Aboriginal people. According to a review in The Telegraph, The Secret River has more action than Grenville's previous novel,The Idea of Perfection.


    True History Of the Kelly Gang by Carey, Peter

    True History of the Kelly Gang is a historical novel by Australian writer Peter Carey. It was first published in Brisbane by the University of Queensland Press in 2000. It won the 2001 Man Booker Prize and the Commonwealth Writers Prize in the same year. Despite its title, the book is fiction and a variation on the Ned Kelly story.


    The Conversations At Curlow Creek by Malouf, David

    David Malouf is the author of many works of fiction and poetry, including the novel Remembering Babylon which received the first-ever International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and was short listed for the Booker Prize. He lives in Sydney, Australia.


    Remembering Babylon by Malouf, David

    Remembering Babylon is a book by David Malouf written in 1993. It won the inaugural IMPAC Award and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Miles Franklin Award. The novel covers themes of isolation, language, relationships (particularly those between men), community and living on the edge (of society, consciousness, culture).


    Ransom by Malouf, David

    David Malouf is the internationally acclaimed author of novels including The Great World (winner of the Commonwealth Writers' prize and the Prix Femina Etranger), Remembering Babylon (shortlisted for the Booker Prize and winner of the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award), An Imaginary Life , Conversations at Curlow Creek and his autobiographical classic 12 Edmondstone Street . His Collected Stories won the 2008 Australia-Asia Literary Award. In 2008 Malouf was the Scottish Arts' Council Muriel Spark International Fellow. Born in 1934 in Brisbane, where he was brought up, he lives in Sydney.


    Cloudstreet by Winton, Tim

    Cloudstreet is a novel by Australian writer Tim Winton. It chronicles the lives of two working class Australian families who come to live together at One Cloud Street, over a period of twenty years, 1943 - 1963. It was the recipient of a Mitchell Burling Award in 1992.


    The Tax Inspector by Carey, Peter

    Peter Carey is the author of seven novels including the Booker Prize-winning Oscar and Lucinda . He has also written a book of short stories ( The Fat Man in History ) and a children’s book ( The Big Bazoohley ). Born in Australia in 1943, he has lived in New York City for ten years, with his wife and their two sons.


    Oscar and Lucinda by Carey, Peter

    Oscar and Lucinda is a novel by Peter Carey, which won the 1988 Booker Prize, and the 1989 Miles Franklin Award. It tells the story of Oscar Hopkins, the Cornish son of a Plymouth Brethren minister who becomes an Anglican priest, and Lucinda Leplastrier, a young Australian heiress who buys a glass factory. They meet on the boat over to Australia, and discover that they are both obsessive gamblers.


    The Harp In the South by Park, Ruth

    The Harp in the South is a novel by New Zealand born Australian author Ruth Park. Published in 1948, it portrays the life of a Catholic Irish Australian family living in the Sydney suburb of Surry Hills, which was at that time an inner city slum.


    Seven Little Australians by Turner, Ethel

    Seven Little Australians (1894) is a classic Australian children's novel by Ethel Turner. Set mainly in Sydney in the 1880s, it relates the adventures of the seven mischievous Woolcot children, their stern army father Captain Woolcot and flighty stepmother Esther. In 1994 the novel was the only book by an Australian author to have been continuously in print for 100 years.


    Looking For Alibrandi by Marchetta, Melina

    For as long as Josephine Alibrandi can remember, it's just been her, her mom, and her grandmother. Now it's her final year at a wealthy Catholic high school. The nuns couldn't be any stricter--but that doesn't seem to stop all kinds of men from coming into her life.Caught between the old-world values of her Italian grandmother, the nononsense wisdom of her mom, and the boys who continue to mystify her, Josephine is on the ride of her life. This will be the year she falls in love, the year she discovers the secrets of her family's past--and the year she sets herself free.Told with unmatched depth and humor, this novel--which swept the pool of Australian literary awards and became a major motion picture--is one to laugh through and cry with, to cherish and remember.From the Trade Paperback edition.


    Dirt Music by Winton, Tim

    Dirt Music by Tim Winton is a Booker prize shortlisted novel from 2001 and winner of the 2002 Miles Franklin Award. The harsh, unyielding climate of Western Australia dominates the actions and events of this thriller.


    Picnic At Hanging Rock - Illustrated Edition by Lindsay, Joan



    Chant Of Jimmie Blacksmith, The by Keneally, Thomas



    Gould's Book Of Fish by Flanagan, Richard



    The Shifting Fog by Morton, Kate



    Cry Of the Curlew by Watt, Peter



    Breath by Winton, Tim



    Here's Luck by Lower, Lennie



    Turning by Winton, Tim



    Papua by Watt, Peter



    The Family Frying Pan by Courtenay, Bryce



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