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First Editions

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First Editions Books & Ephemera


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    AUD $15.00

    Intuitive Healer, The: Acessing Your Inner Physician by Emery, Marcia

    New York, USA: St Martins Press, 1999. Hardcover with green boards and pictorial dustjacket, first edition, 544gms, 231 pages. A comprehensive step-by-step program to access the wisdom of your intuitive mind for greater healing and well-being. Book is in very good condition with minor general wear and tear. Dust jacket is in very good condition with only mild shelf wear, otherwise no other pre-loved markings. . First Edition. Hardcover with Dust Jacket. Very Good/Very Good. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.


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    $11.00

    The Art of the Greeks by H B Walters

    The Art of the Greeks by H B Walters with 112 Plates and 18 Illustrations in the text 1906 Methuen and Co pp277 Printed by T and A Constable, printers to His Majesty at the Edinburgh University Press


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    $210.00

    A Roving Commission by Winston S. Churchill

    New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1930. 1st Edition. Hardcover. Good/Poor. Originally published in October 1930 in England as My Early Life, A Roving Commission is Churchill's extremely popular autobiography, covering the years from his birth in 1874 to his first few years in Parliament. One can hardly ask for more adventurous content. These were momentous and formative years for Churchill, including his time as a war correspondent and cavalry officer in theatres as varied as Cuba, northwest India, and sub-Saharan and southern Africa. This time contained a wide range of experiences in Churchill’s life. Not only was he developing as an author, publishing his first books, and making his first lecture tour of North America, but this was also the time of his capture and daring escape during the Boer War, which made him a celebrity and helped launch his political career. Churchill would take his seat in Parliament only weeks after the end of Queen Victoria's reign. A Roving Commission remains one of the most popular and widely read of all Churchill's books. And for good reason, as the work certainly ranks among the most charming and accessible of his many books. An original 1930 review likened it to a "beaker of Champagne." That effervescent charm endures; a more recent writer called it "a racy, humorous, self-deprecating classic of autobiography." To be sure, Churchill takes some liberties with facts and perhaps unduly lightens or over-simplifies certain events, but this is eminently forgivable and in keeping with the wit, pace, and engaging style that characterizes the book. A Roving Commission sold very well at the time and has seen a great many editions since, many of them collectible in their own right, but of course a premium attaches to first editions. This is one of the few Churchill first editions for which the U.S. edition bears a different title than the British. Jacketed copies are extremely scarce. Even decent unjacketed copies are unusual. The red-orange cloth binding proved highly susceptible to fading and soiling and the orange color on the dust jacket tends to bleach white when exposed to sun. Offered here is a rough example in an even rougher original dust jacket. No getting around it - this is perhaps the worst jacketed copy we've seen. But it is jacketed and we see very few jacketed copies. This copy is also of bibliographic interest, since it is the only first printing copy we have ever seen with the quite rare variant dust jacket usually attributed to the third printing and only the second copy of this variant dust jacket we have seen. This dust jacket has identical spine, front panel, and flaps, but a different rear panel featuring a number of short review excerpts instead of two text excerpts. Richard Langworth ("A Connoisseur's Guide", p.134) ascribes this dust jacket to the first edition, third printing, but it is not noted in any other bibliographic sources. This jacket is a bit of a mystery, since it gives every indication that it has spent its life with this first printing book. As stated, condition of both book and jacket are definitely flawed. The red-orange cloth binding is tight and has square corners, but is soiled, somewhat faded on the boards, quite faded on the spine, and bears some wear at the spine head and tail. The contents are tight, but a bit age-toned with an inked owner name on the ffep and a hint of spotting to the prelims. The Scribner's "A" is present on the copyright page, confirming first edition, first printing status. The dust jacket is unclipped, still bearing the original $3.50 price. That's the good news. The bad news is that the dust jacket has considerable wear and losses. The front face is unfaded, but missing an uneven 3.5 inch wide by maximum 1 inch deep portion at the top edge and with some chipping and wrinkling at the bottom edge. The rear face is soiled and wrinkled, with chipping to a maximum depth of .5 inch along the top edge. The spine is bleached white and roughly a third of it is missing; only part of the title and part of the author's name remains. Still. the quite rare original dust jacket is present, even if decidedly poor and wrapped around a rough first edition book. The dust jacket is protected in a removable, archival quality clear cover. Given condition, we offer this flawed rarity at a low price. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A91.2.a, Woods/ICS A37(b.1), Langworth p. 134.


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    AUD $20.00

    Costume Doll Making by McLaughlin, Eve

    London, England: Pelham Books Ltd, 1975. Hardcover with red boards, first edition, 590g, 120pgs. This book has everything necessary for embarking on a fascinating and rewarding hobby with costume dolls. Contents includes: starting point; making the body; heads and faces; materials and accessories; fabrics and stitches; dressing your doll; historical personages; mounts; and much more. Book is in good condition with mild general wear and tear and light page discolouration/spotting throughout. Dust jacket is in good condition with moderate shelf wear and chipping. Dust jacket has been price clipped, otherwise no other pre-loved markings.. First Edition. Hardcover with Dust Jacket. Good/Good. 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall.


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    $998.00

    Liberalism and the Social Problem by Winston S. Churchill

    London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1909. 1st Edition. Hardcover. Very good. First edition, first printing. This is Churchill’s third book of speeches from his period as an ardent reformer and a bright star of the Liberal Party. Churchill's speeches in this volume address a broad range of social issues still topical today, with the young Churchill trying to chart a progressive course between reactionary conservatism and radical socialism. With only 3,500 first printing copies issued, collector worthy copies have become scarce. Here is a very good++ copy. The dark red cloth binding is tight and square, retaining a nicely rounded spine and bright gilt. The spine of this edition proved highly vulnerable to sunning. This copy shows only light sunning and has much better than average spine presentation. There is trivial wear at the corners and spine ends and mild blistering of the cloth at the top edges and along the rear hinge. The contents are clean and tight with no previous ownership markings of any kind. Spotting is a common problem with this edition. Here spotting is light and substantially confined to the edges of the last 50 pages. The binding is protected with a removable, clear mylar cover. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A29.1.a, Woods/ICS A15(a), Langworth p.92


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    AUD $20.00

    Crocodile: The Australian Story by Holden, Philip

    Rydalmere, Australia: Hodder & Stoughton, 1993. Soft card cover, first edition, 604g, 175pgs, green endpapers. Book is in good condition with mild general wear and tear and light page discolouration/spotting throughout. Corners of wraps are slighly curled. There is a medium sized texta mark on the inside front half-title page. There is a pen inscription from a previous owner on the inside back of the front half-title page, otherwise no other pre-loved markings.. First Edition. Soft Card Cover. Good/Not Applicable. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.


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    $263.00

    Text of Prime Minister Winston Churchill's speech to the Italian People, December 23rd, 1940 by Winston S. Churchill

    New York: The British Library of Information, 1941. First edition, second issue. Leaflet. This pamphlet, from the personal collection of Churchill’s bibliographer, Ronald I. Cohen, is the first edition, scarce second issue of Churchill's December 23, 1940 address to the Italian People. The end of 1940 found Britain having escaped the imminent threat of invasion, but nonetheless beleaguered and pinning many hopes on the United States, which was still months away from approving the Lend Lease Act and nearly a year from formally entering the war. "With his thoughts focused on the many dangers in the Aegean and Mediterranean, Churchill broadcast on the evening of December 23 to the Italian People." (Gilbert, Volume VI, p.960). Churchill spoke from the Central War Room, assuring the Italian People of Britain's historic friendship with Italy and placing the blame for the conflict on Mussolini. "That he is a great man I do not deny, but that after eighteen years of unbridled power he has led your country to the horrid verge of ruin can be denied by none." Churchill read his exchange of letters with Mussolini from the previous May when he had appealed to the Italian leader not to pit Britain and Italy against one another. "Any one can see who it was that wanted peace and who it was that meant to have war." Churchill cast Mussolini as having sided with the Nazis to the detriment of his own people and concluded: "One man, and one man only, has led you; and there I leave this unfolding story until the day comes - as come it will - when the Italian nation will once more take a hand in shaping its own fortunes." This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) Most in the series bear a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a royal arms device at the top right. This copy is the scarce first edition, second issue, strikingly different in appearance from most BLOI pamphlets, featuring simply the title followed immediately by text on the front cover. This four page folded paper leaflet measures 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. Condition is truly fine. The leaflet remains crisp and complete with no age-toning, no spotting, no soiling, no previous ownership marks, and virtually no wear. The pamphlet is protected in a removable, clear plastic sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A137.2, Woods A63


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    $1,260.00

    The World Crisis, full set of 6 British first edition, first printings by Winston S. Churchill

    London: Thornton Butterworth Limited, 1923. 1st Edition. Hardcover. Good. Here is a full British first edition set of Winston Churchill's The World Crisis published between 1923 and 1931. Of The World Crisis, Churchill bibliographer Frederick Woods wrote: "The volumes contain some of Churchill's finest writing, weaving the many threads together with majestic ease, describing the massive battles in terms which fitly combine relish of the literary challenge with an awareness of the sombre tragedy of the events." Churchill was in a special position to write this history, having served both in the Cabinet and on the Front. He served as First Lord of the Admiralty from 1911 until 1915. After the failure in the Dardanelles and the slaughter at Gallipoli Churchill was scapegoated and forced to resign. He spent his political exile as a lieutenant colonel leading a battalion in the trenches. Before war's end, Churchill was exonerated and rejoined the Government, but the stigma would linger. Churchill may have meant for his history of the First World War to clear his name, but his six volume masterwork far exceeds this purpose. Many consider the British edition aesthetically superior to the U.S., with its larger volumes and shoulder notes summarizing the subject of each page. This is a respectable full set of British first edition, first printings. Condition varies from very good to good minus. All six bindings remain square with the original bindings intact. Wear varies from very light for the 1911-1914 and two 1916-1918 volumes to moderate for The Eastern Front, and heavier for 1915 and The Aftermath. The 1915 volume suffers more scuffing and dulling than the other five volumes. The Aftermath suffers from some wrinkling of the spine cloth and from a considerable case of the blistering of the cloth endemic to this edition in general and this volume in particular. The contents of all six volumes are much better than average, with only light spotting that appears confined to page edges and the prelims of The Eastern Front. The Eastern Front is nonetheless a very nice copy of the elusive first printing with all maps and illustrations present, including the 8 photograph portraits and the notoriously fragile folding color map at page 368. The decorative bookplate of Arthur D. Fanshawe is affixed to the front pastedown of the 1911-1914 volume. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Arthur Dalrymple Fanshawe GCB GCVO (2 April 1847 – 21 January 1936) joined the Royal Navy as a cadet in 1860. He went on to be Commander-in-Chief, Australia Station in 1902, President of the Royal Naval College at Greenwich in 1906 and Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth in 1908. There is a single previous owner's name inked to the ffeps of 1916-1918 Part I and The Aftermath and two names (dated 1932 and 1941 respectively) inked to the front pastedown of The Eastern Front. Please note that this large set may require additional postage. Bibliographic reference: A69.2(I-VI), Woods/ICS A31(ab), Langworth p.105.


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    $231.00

    Lord Randolph Churchill by Winston S. Churchill

    London: Macmillan and Company, 1906. First edition, only printing. Hardcover. This is the first edition, only printing of Winston Churchill's biography of his father, Lord Randolph Churchill, a lifelong mated pair bearing Lord Randolph's pasted-in signature. The two-volume work concentrates on Lord Randolph's career in Parliament after 1880. Winston Churchill's father, Lord Randolph, died in January 1895 at age 45 following the spectacular collapse of both his health and political career. His son Winston was 20 years old. When he first contemplated writing his father's biography Winston Churchill was an itinerant soldier and war correspondent who had yet to write his first book. The son still dwelt very much in his father's shadow, both emotionally and in terms of the political career to which he already aspired. By the time the work was published in 1906, the young Winston Churchill already had half a dozen books to his credit and half a decade in Parliament. By 1906 Churchill had already left his father's political party, prevailed in the same political battle that had terminated his father's career, and was just two years from his first Cabinet post. Churchill was criticized by some reviewers for overplaying his father's accomplishments. Nonetheless, the work was well received both as a frank portrayal of Randolph's extremes and as a showcase for the son's literary talent. The first edition is aesthetically pleasing, featuring deep red cloth, untrimmed page edges, gilt stamping, and the family coat of arms on the front covers. However, the red cloth binding of this edition proved quite susceptible to fading and wear and the contents to heavy spotting. This is reasonably typical set, in good plus condition. The bindings remain square and tight with nicely rounded spines and uniform shelf appearance denoting a matched pair, but nonetheless suffering the usual aesthetic flaws, including faded spines and modest wear to extremities. The contents remain bright with spotting primarily to the untrimmed fore and bottom edges, occasionally intruding to inner page margins. The same previous owner name is inked on each front pastedown. Each lower rear pastedown has a small “Times Book Club” sticker. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A17.1, Woods A8(a), Langworth p.69


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    AUD $15.00

    Late Renaissance and Mannerism, The by Murrary, Linda

    New York, USA: Frederick A. Praeger, Publishers, 1967. Hardcover with brown boards and pictorial dust jacket, First Edition, 550gms, 215 pages, blank endpapers. After Raphael's Death, Michelangelo was beyond question the dominant figure in Italian art, and Linda Murray describes the extremely important part that he played in the transition from the simplicity of early High Renaissance art to the more complex and sophisticated style that prevailed in the later sixteenth century. Book is in good condition with minor general wear and tear, minor page discolouration to some pages, message to previous owner on endpaper. Dust Jacket is in good condition with mild shelf wear and has been price clipped, otherwise no other pre-loved markings. . First Edition. Hard Cover with Dust Jacket. Good/Good. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.


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    $1,523.00

    My Early Life by Winston S. Churchill

    London: Thornton Butterworth Limited, 1930. First edition, first printing. Hardcover. This is an unusually clean and bright copy of the first edition, first printing, of Churchill’s extremely popular autobiography. My Early Life covers the years from his birth in 1874 to his first few years in Parliament. One can hardly ask for more adventurous content. These were momentous and formative years for Churchill, including his time as a war correspondent and cavalry officer in theatres as varied as Cuba, northwest India, and sub-Saharan and southern Africa. This time contained a wide range of experiences in Churchill’s life. Not only was he developing as an author, publishing his first books, and making his first lecture tour of North America, but this was also the time of his capture and daring escape during the Boer War, which made him a celebrity and helped launch his political career. Churchill would take his seat in Parliament only weeks after the end of Queen Victoria's reign. My Early Life remains one of the most popular and widely read of all Churchill's books. And for good reason, as the work certainly ranks among the most charming and accessible of his many books. An original 1930 review likened it to a "beaker of Champagne." That effervescent charm endures; a more recent writer called it "a racy, humorous, self-deprecating classic of autobiography." To be sure, Churchill takes some liberties with facts and perhaps unduly lightens or over-simplifies certain events, but this is eminently forgivable and in keeping with the wit, pace, and engaging style that characterizes the book. My Early Life sold very well at the time and has seen a great many editions since, many of them collectible in their own right, but of course a premium attaches to first editions. The challenge for collectors is that the plum colored binding of this edition proved especially susceptible to fading, soiling, and wear; nearly all copies are considerably spine faded. Moreover, the contents are susceptible to heavy spotting and the binding is often cocked. This helps explain why so many first editions of this book have been torn apart and rebound. This copy approaches near fine. The coarse cloth is square and tight with nicely rounded spine, sharp corners, bright gilt, and only trivial wear to extremities. The spine is sunned, as is inevitable, but far less so than we typically see, retaining some of the original plum color and bright gilt, and with clean presentation, marred only by a single, tiny black blemish above the author’s name. The contents are likewise unusually clean and bright. Light spotting is almost entirely confined to the page edges, with just a hint of spotting to the endpapers and prelims. The endpapers show a very faint indication of differential toning corresponding to dust jacket flaps, hinting that this copy may have long been jacketed, which would explain the superior condition of the binding. The sole previous ownership mark we find is a tiny Birmingham bookseller sticker affixed to the lower rear pastedown. The page edges are very lightly spotted and mildly age-toned, but otherwise clean. First edition, first printing is confirmed by the title page verso. Second state of the first printing is confirmed by the inclusion of the 1911-1914 volume of The World Crisis on the half title verso list of works by the author. The binding is protected with a removable, clear mylar protector and housed in a stout grey cloth slipcase with rounded and leather-trimmed caps at the opening. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A91.1.c, Woods/ICS A37(aa), Langworth p.131.


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    $940.00

    Ian Hamilton's March by Winston S. Churchill

    New York: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1900. First U.S. edition, only printing. Hardcover. Near fine. Here is a collector-worthy copy of the U.S. first edition of Churchill's fifth book - the second of his two books based on his newspaper despatches sent from the front in South Africa. In October 1899, the second Boer War erupted in South Africa between the descendants of Dutch settlers and the British. As an adventure-seeking young cavalry officer and war correspondent, Churchill swiftly found himself in South Africa with the 21st Lancers and an assignment as press correspondent to the Morning Post. Not long thereafter - on 18 November 1899, Churchill was captured during a Boer ambush of an armored train. His daring escape less than a month later made him a celebrity and helped launch his political career. Churchill's first Boer War book, London to Ladysmith via Pretoria, contained 27 letters and telegrams to the Morning Post written between 26 October 1899 and 10 March 1900 and was published in England in mid-May. Ian Hamilton's March completes Churchill's coverage of the Boer War, comprising 17 letters to the Morning Post, spanning 31 March through 14 June 1900. While London to Ladysmith via Pretoria had swiftly published Churchill's dispatches in the wake of his capture and escape, for Ian Hamilton's March "the texts of the originally published letters were more extensively revised and four letters were included which had never appeared in periodical form" (Cohen, A8.1.a, Vol. I, p.105). Churchill effected these revisions while on board the passenger and cargo steamer Dunottar Castle which was requisitioned as a troop ship, en route home to England. Churchill arrived on 20 July 1900 and spent the summer campaigning hard in Oldham, capitalizing on his war status and winning his first seat in Parliament on 1 October 1900 in the so-called "khaki election." The narrative in Ian Hamilton's March includes the liberation of the Pretoria prison camp where Churchill had been held and from which he had famously escaped. The title takes its name from General Sir Ian Hamilton's campaign from Bloemfontein to Johannesburg and Pretoria. Churchill would maintain a life-long friendship with Hamilton, who would be involved in the Gallipoli landings and to whom Churchill would sell his first country home. Published on 26 November 1900, the U.S. first edition was thus available for sale when Churchill arrived in New York on 8 December 1900 for his first North American lecture tour. The U.S. first edition saw only a single printing. The number sold is unclear, but seems to be fewer than 1,500. This American edition is thus considerably more scarce than the British first edition, of which more than 5,000 first printing copies were issued. Like the U.S. first edition of Ladysmith, the U.S. first edition of Ian Hamilton's March is bound in pebble grain red buckram which proved quite susceptible to blotchy wear and soiling, particularly on the spine. Offered here is a superior, collector-worthy example. The red cloth binding is clean, tight, and square with vivid color, bright gilt. Wear is minimal, with the only flaw of note being some minor dimpling of the cloth on the blank lower portion of the spine. The contents are superlative - crisp, clean, bright, and tight. No spotting. No inscriptions. No age-toning. Bright top edge gilt. All maps and plans are present and pristine, as is the frontispiece and tissue guard. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A8.2, Woods/ICS A5(ca), Langworth p.61.


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    $578.00

    Britain's Strength: Speech by the Prime Minister, the Rt. Hon. Winston Churchill, in the House of Commons, August 20, 1940 by Winston S. Churchill

    New York: The British Library of Information, 1940. British Library of Information edition, only printing. Pamphlet. This is a beautifully preserved copy of one of Churchill's most famous speeches, occasioned by the Battle of Britain and honoring the RAF pilots who almost single-handedly prevented Nazi invasion of England. The British first edition - with gray wraps printed in red - is the edition most commonly seen. Here is the considerably more scarce British Library of information edition, published in New York for the American audience. This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) Churchill encapsulated and immortalized the struggle that America would not formally join for more than a year when he uttered the words: "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few." The famous bibliographic reference Printing and the Mind of Man, which surveys the impact of the printed word on Western Civilization, singles out this speech. This rare first U.S. edition of this remarkable Churchill speech is in truly exceptional, fine condition. The pamphlet is 8 pages, wire stitched, in self-wrappers, and measures 9 x 6 inches. The paper is bright, crisp, and clean with no wear or creases. The binding staples are bright and tight with no corrosion. A flawless copy in all respects. The pamphlet is protected in an archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A131.2, Woods A60(b), Printing and the Mind of Man (PMM) 424.


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    AUD $12.00

    Sydney: More Than a Harbor - A Photographic Glance at a Surging City by Richards, Barbara

    Sydney, Australia: The K.G. Murray Publishing Company P/L, 1969. Hardcover with black boards and pictorial dustjacket, first edition, 418gms, 59 pages, illustrated endpapers. Book is in good condition with minor general wear and tear and mild page discolouration throughout. Dust jacket is in good condition with only mild shelf wear, otherwise no other pre-loved markings. . First Edition. Hardcover with Dust Jacket. Good/Good. Illus. by Clifford, Beverley. 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall.


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    $1,733.00

    A letter from Winston Churchill's close friend and indispensable wartime Chief of Staff, General Lord Hastings Lionel "Pug" Ismay seeking a copy of Churchill's first book less than a month after Churchill's death and in the final year of Ismay's own life by General Lord Hastings Lionel "Pug" Ismay and Winston S. Churchill

    London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1962. First edition, first printing. Hardcover. Winston Churchill's close friend and indispensable wartime Chief of Staff, "Pug" Ismay, wrote this letter seeking a copy of Churchill's first book less than a month after Churchill's death and in the final year of Ismay's own life. The letter is on Ismay’s letterhead bearing his printed address and telephone number. The typed date is “17th. February 1965.” The typed text reads “Could you be an angel and lend me your copy of “The Story of the Malakand Field Force” as I badly need a quotation for an article that I am writing. If you will send it by registered post I will return it by the same means within three days. Love to you both,” The letter bears Ismay’s autograph salutation, “My dear Mike”, valediction, “Y[ours] – Ever” and is signed with his famous nickname, “Pug”. The recipient, typed at the foot of the letter, was “M. Holden-White. Esq.” of “10, Lowndes Street, Lowndes Square. S.W.1.” Of General Lord Hastings Lionel “Pug” Ismay, 1st Baron Ismay (1887-1965), Churchill said: “We became hand in glove and much more…” (Churchill, The Gathering Storm) When Churchill became Prime Minister in May 1940, he also assumed appointment as Minister of Defence. Ismay served Churchill as Chief of Staff in that capacity, and in other roles, including Deputy Secretary to the War Cabinet, for Churchill’s entire wartime premiership. “Shrewd, resilient, accessible, emollient in diplomacy but of an unbreachable integrity”, Ismay “…commanded the prime minister's absolute trust. He was the essential link with the chiefs of staff... Difficult allies respected him as much as did difficult colleagues.” (ODNB) Ismay was promoted Lieutenant-General in 1942 and General in 1944, and made Baron in 1947. When Churchill’s second premiership began in October 1951, Ismay was first appointed Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations and, swiftly thereafter, Secretary-General of NATO, a post he held until his retirement in 1957. In late 1960, Ismay published his own Memoirs, which include a prefatory Tribute from Churchill “to the signal services which Lord Ismay has rendered to our country, and to the free world, in peace and war.” It is poignant that Ismay sought Churchill’s first published book so soon after the death of his friend and so near to his own. Like Churchill, Ismay was educated at Sandhurst and saw early service as a cavalry officer in India. Although, unlike Churchill, Ismay did not leave soldiering for politics, even his early career was deeply shaped by his future Prime Minister and patron. In his Memoirs, Ismay wrote that “As a young officer in India in 1910, Mr. Winston Churchill, whom I had never met, and, as it then seemed, was unlikely ever to meet, exercised a decisive influence on my future.” Despite shock that “anyone who had started so brilliantly should have thrown it all up and gone into Parliament” Ismay was critically inspired by Churchill’s intrepid early accomplishments. Ismay felt “on the whole, I could not do better than try to emulate the example of his early years.” Of course, the earliest of these early years are chronicled in Churchill’s first published book, The Story of the Malakand Field Force, which recounts Churchill's experiences while attached to Sir Bindon Blood's punitive expedition on the Northwest Frontier of India in 1897. The edition of the text most readily available in February 1965 was Frontiers and Wars. Published in 1962, this is a single volume abridgement of Churchill's first four war books, including The Story of the Malakand Field Force. This is not a compellingly well-preserved first printing copy of Frontiers and Wars, showing sunning, soiling, and wear. But it is the copy in which Lord Ismay’s letter was found and it seems quite plausible that this was the very copy lent in response to his request. Hence we offer them together and encourage the future owner to keep them thus. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A274.1.a, Woods/ICS A142/1(a.1), Langworth p.340.


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    AUD $16.00

    Adam Lindsay Gordon Favourites: A Special Sesqui-Centenary Edition by Gordon, Adam Lindsay

    South Yarra, Australia: Currey O'Neil Ross Pty Ltd, 1984. Hardcover with brown boards and pictorial dust jacket, first edition, 590gms, 114 pages, brown endpapers. Book is in good condition with minor general wear and tear and light page discolouration throughout. There is a small pen marking on the inside front page from a previous owner. Boards and dust jacket are in good condition with only light shelf wear, otherwise no other pre-loved markings.. First Edition. Hardcover with Dust Jacket. Good/Good. 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall.


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    $105.00

    Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volume III by Winston S. Churchill

    New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1935. First edition, first printing. Hardcover. This is a jacketed U.S. first edition of the third volume of Churchill's Marlborough: His Life and Times. The British first edition was issued in four volumes. The U.S. publisher chose to split the first two volumes into two books each, resulting in a six volume set that is otherwise identical in content to the British. This U.S. first printing of Volume III is near fine in a good plus, uniform issue blue and gold dust jacket. The green cloth binding is square, clean, bright, and tight with bright spine gilt. We note only trivial shelf wear to extremities and a miniscule lower front corner bump. The contents are bright with no previous ownership marks. The Scribner’s “A” on the copyright page confirms first printing. Trivial spotting is confined to the top edge. The dust jacket is bright and substantially complete, retaining the original “$2.75” front flap price and showing only fractional chip losses to extremities. Nonetheless, the jacket shows substantial overall scuffing and wear. The dust jacket is protected in a removable, archival quality clear cover. Winston Churchill's monumental biography of his great ancestor, John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, was initially conceived a full 40 years before publication of the fourth and final volume. Churchill originally considered the idea of the biography in 1898, returning to it in earnest in 1928.  Marlborough ultimately took 10 years of research and writing and is the most substantial published work of Churchill's "wilderness years" in the 1930s. This decade saw Churchill pass into his sixties with his own future as uncertain as that of his nation.  It is perhaps not incidental that Churchill’s great work of the 1930s was about a great ancestor.  Churchill may have wondered more than once if the life history he was writing might ultimately eclipse his own.  Richard Langworth says "To understand the Churchill of the Second World War, the majestic blending of his commanding English with historical precedent, one has to read Marlborough.”  Two months after Volume I was published, on 12 December 1933, T.E. Lawrence wrote to Churchill: “I finished it only yesterday.  I wish I had not… The skeleton of the book is so good.  Its parts balance and the main stream flows… Marlborough has the big scene-painting, the informed pictures of men, the sober comment on political method, the humour, irony and understanding of your normal writing: but beyond that it shows more discipline and strength: and great dignity.  It is history, solemn and decorative. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A97.4(III).a, Woods/ICS A49(ba), Langworth p.169.


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    AUD $10.00

    Domes of Fire: The Tamuli (Book #1) by Eddings, David

    Hammersmith, England: Harpercollins Publishers (Harper Collins), 1992. Hardcover with black boards and pictorial dust jacket, first edition, 956gms, 470 pages, blank endpapers. This is book #1 in The Tamuli series. Book is in good condition with minor general wear and tear and moderate page discolouration throughout. Dust jacket is in good condition with mild shelf wear, otherwise no other pre-loved markings.. First Edition. Hard Cover with Dust Jacket. Good/Good. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.


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    $137.00

    Europe Unite by Winston S. Churchill

    London: Cassell and Company Ltd., 1950. First edition, only printing. Hardcover. This is a jacketed copy of the British first edition, only printing of the second of Churchill's five postwar speech volumes. Condition is near fine plus in a very good plus dust jacket. The green cloth binding is square and tight with bright spine gilt and no appreciable wear. The contents are notably clean, with no spotting and clean page edges that show only mild age-toning. The sole previous ownership mark is a decorative bookplate affixed to the front pastedown. The dust jacket is unclipped, retaining the publisher’s original price on the lower front flap, and complete apart from a hint of fractional loss at the spine head. Wear is minimal, confined to the spine head, corners, and a 1.25 inch closed tear at the upper rear hinge. What prevents our grading this jacket as near fine is age-toning to the white rear panel, which is only lightly soiled. The dust jacket is protected beneath a removable, archival quality clear cover. Europe Unite includes 52 speeches spanning January 1947 to December 1948. Having done so much to win the war, Churchill faced frustration of his postwar plans when his wartime government fell to Labour in the General Election of July 1945. Europe Unite reflects Churchill's position as then-Leader of the Opposition, and many of the speeches contain both domestic and foreign policy indictments of Clement Attlee's Labour Government. Nonetheless, the title is rooted in Churchill's 7 May 1948 speech to the Congress of Europe. Churchill was an early, ardent, and vital advocate of pan-European integration. This and earlier speeches lent impetus to what would eventually become the European Union. As ardent an advocate as Churchill was of Britain, and though his rhetoric and sentiments could ascend inspiring heights, Churchill had been a soldier, a war leader, a politician and a statesman and as such, could not fail to be a realist. Postwar Britain was diminished economically, militarily, and territorially. As Randolph Churchill said in his introduction to the book, Britain's "place in the world can only be regained" in part by "assumption by Britain of a leading role in promoting the unity of Europe." The movement toward European integration would continue to prevail. So would Churchill. During the election of February 1950 - the month this book was published - Churchill polled more than 37,000 votes, double that of his challenger. Labour's majority was reduced to six, and when Prime Minister Clement Attlee called another election in October 1951 the Conservatives won 321 seats to Labour’s 295, returning Churchill to Downing Street at the age of 76. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A246.1, Woods/ICS A128(a), Langworth p.296


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    $123.71

    CUBBY BEAR HAS A MIND OF HIS OWN by Burgess, Thornton W.; Jordan, Nina R

    Whiman Publishing Co.. Good+. 1927. First Edition. Hardcover. SIGNED/inscribed by author inside front board. Bk is small bk with boards age browned, rubbing to spine ends, small nick in spine; corners worn. Pgs have separated from boards and laying inside. Pgs age browned. ; 16mo 6" - 7" tall; Signed by Author .


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    $630.00

    The World Crisis: The Aftermath by Winston S. Churchill

    London: Thornton Butterworth Limited, 1929. First edition, first printing. Hardcover. This is a jacketed British first edition, first printing of the fifth and penultimate volume of Churchill's monumental history of the First World War. A quarter of a century before the Second World War endowed him with lasting fame, Winston Churchill played a uniquely critical, controversial, and varied role in the “War to end all wars”. This volume deals with the postwar years 1918 to 1928. Though the U.S. first edition of The World Crisis preceded the British, many consider the British edition aesthetically superior, with its larger volumes and shoulder notes summarizing the subject of each page. Unfortunately, the original dust jackets are scarce and the smooth navy cloth of the British first editions proved quite susceptible to wear, the contents prone to spotting and toning. Moreover, the cloth binding of this fifth volume proved particularly susceptible to blistering. Condition of this first edition, first printing is near fine in a very good plus dust jacket. The blue cloth binding is immaculately bright, square, and tight, with sharp corners, vivid spine gilt, and only a trivial hint of wear to extremities. Blistering is nominal for the edition, with just a hint along the upper rear hinge. The contents remain bright and crisp; the book feels unread. We find no previous ownership marks. Differential toning to the endpapers corresponding to the dust jacket flaps confirms that this copy has spent life jacketed. Light spotting appears entirely confined to the page edges. The dust jacket is nearly complete, with a quite shallow strip loss at the spine head extending onto the upper front panel and fractional loss at the corners and a few points along the front flap fold. The spine is modestly toned and scuffed, the panels comparatively clean with modest toning to the edges. The dust jacket is now protected beneath a removable, archival quality clear cover. Published between 1923 and 1931, The World Crisis spans the 1911-1918 war years, with two supplemental volumes covering the postwar years 1918-1928 (The Aftermath) and the Eastern theatre (The Eastern Front). Of The World Crisis, Frederick Woods wrote: "The volumes contain some of Churchill's finest writing, weaving the many threads together with majestic ease, describing the massive battles in terms which fitly combine relish of the literary challenge with an awareness of the sombre tragedy of the events." Churchill was in a special position to write this history, having served both in the Cabinet and on the Front. Churchill served as First Lord of the Admiralty from 1911 until 1915, but after the failure in the Dardanelles, he was scapegoated and forced to resign. He spent his political exile as a lieutenant colonel leading a battalion in the trenches. Before the war's end, Churchill was exonerated and rejoined the Government, foreshadowing the political isolation and restoration he would experience nearly two decades later leading up to the Second World War. Despite Churchill's political recovery, the stigma of the Dardanelles would linger. Churchill may have meant for his history of the First World War to clear his name, but his six-volume masterwork far exceeds this purpose. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A69.2(IV).b, Woods/ICS A31(ab), Langworth p.105.


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    AUD $10.00

    Making a Nest In the Hills by Barrow, Joy

    Otford, NSW, Australia: Otford Press, 2002. Hardcover with blue/purple boards and pictorial dust jacket, first edition, 600gms, 136 pages, illustrated endpapers. Joy Barrow changed lifestyle from international film producer to a hands-on farmer in a small Mudgee village. Owning a vineyard is an experience of extremes fromecstatic highs to the depths of despair. Book is in very good condition with minor general wear and tear. Boards and dust jacket are in good condition with only mild shelf wear, otherwise no other pre-loved markings.. First Edition. Hardcover with Dust Jacket. Very Good/Good. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.


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    $475.00

    Stone Raft. by Saramago, Jose

    Orlando: Harcourt, 1995. First edition of the Nobel Prize-winning author's third book to be translated into English. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Signed and dated by Jose Saramago. The Stone Raft tells the story of the Iberian Peninsula breaking free of Europe and begins to drift across the North Atlantic, five people are drawn together on the newly formed island-first by surreal events and then by love. "A splendidly imagined epic voyage...a fabulous fable" (Kirkus Reviews).


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    AUD $5.50

    Amy's Children by Masters, Olga

    St Lucia, Australia: University of Queensland Press, 1987. Medium softcover, first edition, 192gms, 240 pages. Book is in fair to good condition with general age-related wear and tear and moderate page discolouration/spotting throughout. Inside front few pages are beginning to come loose, otherwise no other pre-loved markings.. First Edition. Softcover. Fair to Good/Not Applicable. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.


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