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Boston Courier, Boston, Mass. Thursday, August 27, 1829

Boston, MA: Adams & Holden, Printers, 1829. 39 x 54 cm. Harvard College ceremonies will commence at 11 o'clock today for inauguration of Hon. Joseph Story LL.D. and of John Hooker Ashmun, A.M. Order of procession is detailed. Tomorrow is the annual commencement. Editor laments fact that some speeches were in Latin. Poetical Statement of Ladies' and Gentlemen's Fashions: ""Gowns are made full like a bag..they may gather up plenty of dirt...the hats are so large, and so monstrously wide, that a coach can now take but one of a side..."" ""To shave off the beard is accounted a sin..."" Letter from a Boston Merchant reports on Japan--how they sleep , with head on a wooden cushion; Japanese are fond of show and what furniture they have is for sight rather than service. Basil Hal's Travels: The English nation sent this ""titled fool"" to write his travels in this country. He observes that the ""women of the United States do not enjoy that station in society which has been allotted to them elsewhere."" Listing of fine coppered brig Ivanhoe will sail for Malta and Trieste; a good vessel has half her freight, sailing for Havana; Packet brig James will sail for Halifax, NS on Saturday. Fast-sailing copper-fastened and coppered packet brig Sardius is sailing for New-Orleans. Newspaper, good. Rag content makes this very durable paper. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$17.00

New-Hampshire Patriot & State Gazette, Concord, NH Tuesday morning, June 13, 1820

Concord, NH: Hill & Moore, Publishers, 1820. 36 x 55 cm. An Act of Congress to impose new tonnage duty on French ships, signed by President Monroe, is published, along with several other laws. The Legislature of the State of Maine assembled for the first time at Portland on May 31st. Gen. King is elected Governor. Letter from New Orleans reports that 18 men convicted as pirates are to be hanged, and their accomplices have been setting buildings on fire in order to draw citizens away from the prison. Discussion on Religious Freedom. Now that Maine has been separated from Massachusetts, that state may produce a new constitution which will remove all religious tests. American ships engaged in the African slave trade now number over 200; by a new law of Congress, all who engage in this trade will be adjudged pirates, and on conviction are to suffer death.Excellent Tavern Stand near the lower meeting house in Salisbury, N.H. is for sale. It is situated in a very pleasant and flourishing village and on a great public road (the fourth NH turnpike). New line of stages has commenced running from Concord to Haverhill, NH three times a week. Leaves Concord at 4 a.m. and arrives Haverhill at 5 p.m. Price of stage-fare $3.50. Newspaper, good. Rag content makes this very durable paper. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$28.05

Economist, The; A financial, commercial and real-estate newspaper, vol. iv no. 13, september 27, 1890

By Evans, Clinton B., Editor

Chicago, IL: Economist Publishing Co, 1890. 25 x 33 cm. Editorial notes that business of the country has settled back to normal after the serious flurry in the New York money market; cotton crop is heavy and good, outlook for cotton goods mills is encouraging ; many financial and real estate ads. Paper periodical, cover lightly soiled, very good. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$13.60

New-Hampshire Patriot, Concord, (New-Hampshire), Tuesday, July 22, 1817; Printed by Isaac Hill, Publisher of the Laws of the United States

By Hill, Isaac

Concord, NH: Isaac Hill, 1817. 35 x 53 cm. This issue is full of reports of the visit of President Monroe to New England. He leaves Boston for Lynn, then Marblehead, where he remains the night. At each place he is met by local military units, including artillery and cavalry, and many brass bands. Lots of speeches, including those of heroes of the past two wars with England. After Salem he proceeds through Ipswich, Newburyport, Amesbury, and then to Portsmouth, NH. Then to Kittery, up to York, Wells, Arundel, Biddeford and Saco, then Scarborough and an overnight at Portland. He visited forts and defenses in all locations. Then down to Biddeford, Berwick, South Berwick, Nottingham, Northwood and Epson....and over to Concord for a visit of three days. Details of Pres. Monroe's stay in Concord. Piece of Satire from Bristol Mercury of May 5: The opinion of the Physicians on the case of John Bull, Gentleman. Bull's condition is impaired--he has no constitution at all. He's just been through a boxing match with a French prize fighter called Little Nappy, and on it goes, gently chiding Great Britain. Report from the Bangor Register of trial of Susep, an Indian of the Penobscot Tribe, accused of murdering Wm. Knight of Bangor. He was defended by John Neptune, also an Indian, but with the ease and confidence of a Cicero. Jury found him guilty of manslaughter, and he was ordered to prison for a year. Newspaper, edges worn and frayed, rag content of paper has preserved it well. Name ""Joseph Low, Esq."" written at top of page one. Fair. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$37.40

Courier of New Hampshire, Concord, Saturday, January 2, 1796; Devoted to News and National Politicks, No. 48--Vol. VI

By Hough, George, Publisher

Concord, NH: George Hough, 1796. 28 x 46 cm. This little 18th century paper is almost all dedicated to foreign news. British King's Speech: Text of King's speech in the House of Lords, Thursday, Oct. 29 (1795) expressed great satisfaction conditions have improved this (1795) year. ""In Italy the threatened invasion of the French has been driven back.... also reason to hope that the recent operations of the Austrian Army have checked the progress which they have made on the side of Germany....I have concluded engagements of Defensive Alliance with the two Imperial Courts; and the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce with the United States of America..."" Report on Affairs of France, Oct. 6 [1795] from Convention: ""CIVIL WAR!"" ""The cry of 'To Arms!' was heard around the National Palace, and instantly all the military and citizens who surrounded it ranged themselves in order of battle....."" ""Great agitation prevailed in the Assembly."" Two hours later, firing abated, help was given to the wounded, and the General in Chief announced that the rebels are everywhere repulsed, and the Republic is triumphant. Federalism of Pennsylvania: Extracts from Governor Mifflin's Speech to the Pennsylvania Legislature, Seven Eighths Federal. Report of Mr. Randolph's Vindication and exchange of correspondence with General Washington. Advertisements for Journeyman Cabinet Makers for Choate & Martin at their shop in Concord; Moses Swett informs the public that he has opened a House of Entertainment on Bosawen Plain, nine miles from Concord, where utmost attention will be paid to travellers. Newspaper, single sheet printed on both sides. Small tears in folds, name ""Timothy Felton"" written on top of page one. Poor. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$49.30

New-Hampshire Patriot, Concord, (New-Hampshire), Tuesday, April 9, 1816; Printed by Isaac Hill, Publisher of the Laws of the United States

By Hill, Isaac

Concord, NH: Isaac Hill, 1816. 35 x 53 cm. Speech of the Hon. Mr. (Henry) Clay in the House of Representatives on the Subject of the Direct Tax. Clay notes debt accumulated by the recent war (War of 1812) as well as the Revolutionary War and the wars with Tripoli and Algiers. He mentions that he was ""in the vicinity"" of the Battle of Waterloo. [He was in London, and saw the illuminations and celebration after Wellington defeated Napoleon.] Clay ranges wide, discussing the Treaty of Ghent, fishing rights off Newfoundland. One of the great causes of the war, he says, was impressment of American sailors, and now that is stopped. ""What have we gained by the war?"" he asked, then answered, ""..before the war... we were the scorn of the universe... contempt of ourselves......"" We have gained ""respectabilty and character abroad---security and confidence at home....our character and constitution are placed on a solid basis never to be shaken."" Article fills whole front page and one column of page 2, and is continued. Dartmouth Colege: ""The insidious hand of one of the intolerant Trustees is discovered.."" Discussion of scandal and abuse towards Dartmouth President Wheelock....Accusations of hypocrisy and malignity..... Thompson and others have been effectively ""put down"" by their own ""wicked attempt 'to put down' a certain man!"" Remarkable letter to the Printer by Mary Pitcher, dated April 1, 1816 takes up about one column to reel out literary allusions and flowing discourse, alluding to witchery--- appears to be April Fool's tomfoolery. Notice of those people in New Hampshire who have not paid their Direct Tax in conformity with the Act of Congress, 1813. Newspaper, edges worn and frayed, rag content of paper has preserved it well. Fair. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$37.40

Farmers' Cabinet, Amherst, (N.H.) Saturday, August 3, 1822 No. 46 Vol. 20

By Boylston, Richard, Publisher

Amherst, NH: Richard Boylston, 1822. 31 x 51 cm. This paper is still published in 2012 as the Milford Cabinet, Milford being adjacent to Amherst. Report on Missionary Work with the Osage Indians who have exceedingly unpleasant habits. Their mode of cooking is polluted, neatness, cleanliness and chastity are unknown among them, and they like to fight. ""Mr. Adams and Mr. Russell"" is an abbreviated account from The National Intelligencer about a conflict going back to the negotiations for the Treaty of Ghent, ending the War of 1812. Jonathan Russell and John Quincy Adams were ministers sent by President Monroe and this kerfluffle involved Russell and a letter he wrote, then lost, then he provided a different version, which he called a ""copy"" or a ""duplicate""... all of this arose in 1822 in advance of the forthcoming campaign of Mr. Adams for president. Latest from Europe: It is now certain that there will be no war between Turkey and Russia. The Turks have complied with the demand of Emperor Alexander for the evacuation f Moldavia and Wallachia. Greeks in two villages sacked by Turks have immolated Greek wives and children to prevent them from being violated. Greeks have burnt two Turkish ships of the line, two frigates, a corvette. Spanish Agression: U.S. Schooner Porpoise, commanded by Lieutenant James Ramage arrived at St. Thomas after having been fired upon by two Spanish privateers, who shot away one of her shrouds, and passed several balls through her. [Ramage had already made a name for himself by destroying a pirate base with six vessels near Bahia Honda, Cuba.] [Is James Ramage an ancestor of WWII Submariner Lawson Ramage??] Ads for Stray Mare belonging to Ephraim French of Amherst; Samuel Gill, indentured boy--Notice to all persons harboring him or trusting him on account of Caleb Turner of Milford. David Russell has a fine assortment of Kid & Morocco Shoes at his shop near the Meeting House in Amherst. Newspaper, edges frayed, vertical fold nearly separated, poor. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$34.00

Boston Weekly Journal, Boston, Mass., Thursday Morning, February 25, 1869

Boston, MA: Charles O. Rogers, 120 Washington St, 1869. 52 x 68 cm. Dispatch from St. Louis reports that all of the Kiowas except four or five lodges have come in to make peace, and will at once be assigned reservations. Kiowas have been the most troublesome and hostile of the frontier tribes. Part of the Arapaho and Cheyenne tribes have also presented themselves at the Government headquarters for assignment ot reservations. Gen. Cushingmet with success in negotiations with the Government of Colombia for the right to construct an inter-oceanic canal across the Isthmus of Darien. Discussion about the way that the President-elect, General Grant, is going about forming his Cabinet. Meagre information from Cuba indicates that troubles there are daily becoming more serious, and both the Spanish government and Gen. Dulce have misapprehended the extent and true nature of the outbreak. Bands of insurgents are making their appearance in every part of the island. Newspaper, worn, dampstained, good. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$21.25

Vermont Journal, Brattleboro, Saturday, April 9, 1881

Brattleboro, VT: The Journal Company, 1881. 40 x 58 cm. The sacredness of the Sabbath is not always observed by politicians. Last Saturday Senators Conkling and Platt, Governor Cornell, Vice President Arthur and Postmaster-General James did not get through comparing notes until Sunday. Four years ago Conkling engaged in a power struggle with President Hayes. ""The Hero of Gettysburg"" was not General Hancock, recently defeated in the national election by Garfield, but General Meade. There are at least a dozen Senators who may be called millionaires, led by Sen. Fair of Nevada, probably worth as much as all the others put together. Next is Davis of Illinois who has gathered millions, as well as 375 pounds avoirdupois. Sawyer of Wisconsin, who was a poor Vermont boy, is next. The Story Teller: ""Poor Miss Brackenthorpe"" --what was revealed after she died. Illustrated ads for Perry Davis' Pain Killer, The ""Only"" Lung Pad, Madame Griswold's Skirt-supporting Corsets. Newspapers, numerous tiny tears in creases, paper unopened, fair. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$20.40

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Thursday, August 13, 1829

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1829. 39 x 53 cm. This is a lively Boston paper from the time when Andrew Jackson was President. ""Letters from a Boston Merchant"" recalls that in last chapter he said that Japan was ""Paradise of Dogs""--- rambling discussion about hunting for dogs and dog-hospitals. Refuge for Destitute Mosquitoes.. relates tale of a man on the Dorchester flats where the mosquitoes are as large and as hungry as in Turkey, and of man who bet he could strip bare and lie naked for five minutes with mosquitoes. Japanese have taste for fine gardens. ""Extyinction of Egypt"" dissertation on course of the Niger, speculation on physical extinction of Egypt. Commentary on Boston Newspapers reports opiunions oif Mr. Ruffleshirt, Mr. Neverchange, Mr. Firebrand, Mr. Scrupulous and Mr. Sugarplum. Adv. with illustration of Patent Sponge Boots for Horses' Feet. See James Boyd, 27 Merchants' Row. Newspaper, worn, fair. Name ""G. Wilkinson"" written at top of front page. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$25.50

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Thursday, April 30, 1829

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1829. 39 x 53 cm. This is a lively Boston paper from the time when Andrew Jackson was President. ""An Apology for the United States"" editor comments on article from the Edinburgh Review: ""we do not recollect that we ever read an article… more insulting in its tone toward the people of the United States."" Editorial critical of Gen. Jackson and his cabinet, commenting on difference between him and Pres. Jefferson. Jackson, editor writes, appointed cabinet members strictly on political basis. A line of steam-boats is established to run the next summer between Boston and Portland. ""Office Hunting"" critical of men turned out of office and those begging for offices as new administration begins. Newspaper, worn, fair. Name ""G. Wilkinson"" written at top of front page. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$25.50

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Thursday, March 5, 1829

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1829. 39 x 53 cm. This is a lively Boston paper from the time when Andrew Jackson was President. ""Domestic Slave Trade"" story from National Gazette tells about steamer on which writer was embarked encountering steamboat Tesch completely aflame. In aftermath several slaves were killed; two years later (1827) in Frankfort, KY trial takes place initiated by slave trader-- much disapproval of slave trade-- then fire breaks out in courthouse. Slaves as ""property"". Announcement of new administration in Washington: Van Buren as Secretary of State, Ingham of PA to be Secretary of the Treasury, McLean of OH to be Postmaster General, Eaton of TN to be Secretary of War, Branch of NC to be Secretary of the Navy. Long editorial discusses new cabinet. Newspaper, worn, fair. Name ""G. Wilkinson"" written at top of front page. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$25.50

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Thursday, May 7, 1829

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1829. 39 x 53 cm. This is a lively Boston paper from the time when Andrew Jackson was President. News from Kentucky about Henry Clay, who would later run for President.Gen. Houston has resigned as governor of Tennessee with remarkable resignation letter. ""Decree of Bolivar"" reports new trade and commerce rules by Simon Bolivar for Gran Colombia (Venezuela). Tongue-in-cheek report on May Day in New York. Story of intemperance and murder in Maine. Letter from a Boston Merchant who writes about his trip out of Leghorn, Italy en route Florence. Humorous commentary on the militia in Massachusetts. Newspaper, worn, some foxing, fair. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$24.65

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Thursday, August 6, 1829

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1829. 39 x 53 cm. This is a lively Boston paper from the time when Andrew Jackson was President. Letter to Editor critical of recent editorial about lectures of Miss Wright, takes Courier to task. Signed ""Fair Play"". Following this, editor notes that he will not comment on the letter, but then he does. Nearly two columns on front page discussing role of women and performance of Miss Wright. Text of speech by celebrated Irish orator O'Connell at Kilrush on June 15. Critical of the British, praises the men of Clare. Chiding commentary on failure of New York newspaper publishers to send their papers north on time. Paper reprints report from Fourth of July celebration in South Carolina which is critical of Kentucky and ""The American System"" (This was a proposal by Henry Clay and the Whigs) as opposed to States Rights, a favorite in South Carolina. Speeches also criticize President Adams. Newspaper, worn, fair. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$25.50

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Monday, September 7, 1829

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1829. 39 x 53 cm. Long list about discipline at the House of Reformation at South Boston, including requirements of inmates and privileges for positive improvements. Latest from Europe: Ireland still in turmoil. Liverpool Chronicle reports of poor treatment of Protestants, Daniel O'Connell is head of the mob. Commentary on the Siamese twins, Chang and Eng. Commentary on the Sioux Indians from the Journal of a Gentleman; Divbided into tribes: Minokontongs, Walkpotongs, Walkpekoata, Sissitongs, Yantongs and Titongs. All inhabit a country from Mississippi West to the Rocky Mountains from lats. 43 to 49 N. Population about 40,000. Stage accidentinvolved Easterm line Mail Stage coming from Boston yesterday on the Turnpike near the Saugus Bridge. The President (Andrew Jackson) has returned from a trip to Fort Calhoun, much improved in health. Newspaper, worn, poor. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$24.65

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Monday, September 21, 1829

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1829. 39 x 53 cm. From Worcester Aegis: Get on with plans and build the railroad-- we don't care how it is routed, but just build it. Our ancient commonwealth is daily losing her influence.. Take the lead in the improvements of the age! Report from Vera Cruz states that Spanish expedieiton debarked at Cao Rojo with 3000 men, mostly negroes and mulattos. The Cossacks on the Coast made an end to them, taking a captain and three soldiers alive. Rogues have robbed the Merchants Bank in Salem, MA but were only able to steral $20, this amount had just been depositied by the ""Society for the Detection of Thieves and Robbers"". News from Europe reports that the Emperor of Russia has visited Bobruisk and viewed about 2000 Turkish prisoners of war. Count Diebitsch has completely invested Shumla. Prince Madotow with a party of Cossaks, has succeeded in crossing the balkan. Report that gold has been more effective than arms in gaining the fortress of Silistria. Newspaper, worn, poor. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$23.80

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Thursday, January 7, 1830

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1830. 39 x 53 cm. Editorial critical of discourse in Congress in Washington re debate about distributing proceeds of the public lands by Mr. Polk. ""Where words abound much fruit of solid sense is seldom found."" Commentary on the ""Jacksonism"" of Mr. Thomas D. Arnold of Tennessee.Report of proposal by DeWitt Clinton to build a railroad from New York to the state of Missouri. Report from France notes that French journals continue their ""harpings"" suggesting that the days of the French monarchy are numbered. Newspaper, worn, fair. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$20.40

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Monday, January 18, 1830

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1830. 39 x 53 cm. Discussion of the Georgia Doctrine of Permissive Possession. Following lead of the President, General Jackson, there emerges a new doctrinal way to address right of Indian tribes to land. ""Shall then the people of the United States of the present age hear with indifference and unconcern the rancorous and horrid threats of Georgia against their red brethren?"" Compares what Mahometans (Muslims) have done to Christians of Scio. Election of new president of Harvard College, John Quincy Adams, former U.S. President. From the Havre Journal is article critical of Empress Maria Louisa and her woeful appearance; her homeliness is shocking to those who formerly beheld her upon the first throne of the universe. Report from Vera Cruz of state of new revolution in Mexico. As of Dec. 13 Santa Anna was expected to have made up his mind as to his course of action. Much news from Boston market. Newspaper, worn, fair. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$23.80

Boston Courier Semi-Weekly, Thursday, November 4, 1830

By Buckingham, J.T

Boston, MA: J.T. Buckingham, Editor and Proprietor, 1830. 39 x 53 cm. Much turmoil in Europe; papers aboard ships arriving in Boston report rumor of 20,000 killed in St. Petersburg; revolution in north of Spain; city of Brussels is in confusion, women and children flying from the city; in Saxony Prince Maximilian has abdicated and in Brunswick the brother of the Duke has assumed the empty throne of the runaway King; the populace has risen in Coblentz and Frankfort-on-the-Main; but France appears quiet--the new king is striving to be popular. Report to the New York Advertiser is published on the Character of the Chippewas and their relatives the Ottawas and Pottowattomies, etc. Visit to Malden, British port below Detroit witnessed Indians greatly inebriated. However, correspondent was very impressed with Chippewa character and intelligence. Death of Duke of Bourbon, Prince of Conde. Newspaper, worn, poor. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$24.65

Farmers' Cabinet, The; Milford Advance and Wilton Journal, Milford, NH June 30, 1898

By Rotch, W.B. Editor and Publisher

Milford, NH: The Farmers' Cabinet, 1898. 38 x 56 cm. This issue of this famous old weekly southern New Hampshire paper concentrates on local news, with a drawing of Colonel J.A. Greene, the Fourth of July orator for Milford's celebration. Also there are plans for an elaborate electrical display will be used to imitate the destruction of a battleship in the Souhegan River (after the destruction of USS Maine in Havana Harbor). There will also be a tug of war, a wheelbarrow race, and more. News of the War with Spain is on page 4, speculating on raids on the Spanish homeland by the U.S. Navy after the victory in the Philippine Islands by Admiral Dewey. News from Cuba includes report of U.S. troops surrounding Santiago. Report of Strawberry Day for New Hampshire Horticultural Society, visiting George F. Beede's farm of acres of the finest berries. ""California Letter"" details the extensive lines of the Union Pacific in California, description of San Jose (San Hozay, it explains) Pacific Grove, Monterey and Santa Cruz. Distances are given from ""Frisco"". Ad for cure for constipated bowels and biliousness: Ayer's Pills and Ayer's Sarsaparilla. Article ""An Army Officer's Life"" starts with description of 63-year-old former army officer and ends with testimonial to Dr. Williams' Pink Pills for Pale People. Newspaper, good. . Catalogs: Newspapers/History.

$17.00

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