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California Addresses by President Roosevelt.
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California Addresses by President Roosevelt.

By Roosevelt, Theodore

San Francisco: The California Promotion Committee, 1903. First edition of this collection of speeches delivered by President Theodore Roosevelt throughout California. Octavo, original half cloth with paper title label to the front panel, illustrated with engravings including tissue-guarded frontispiece portrait of Roosevelt. In near fine condition. A notable orator, Theodore Roosevelt was known for his distinctive and resounding low timbre. He was one of the first Presidents whose voice was recorded for posterity and several of his recorded speeches survive. His California Addresses include Remarks on Raymond, Modesto, and Truckee, an Address at the Laying of the Cornerstone of the Y.M.C.A. of Vallejo, and an Address to the Service Men of the Spanish War.

$350.00

Kubrick.
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Kubrick.

By Herr, Michael

New York: Grove Books, 2000. First edition of this biography on the legendary director Stanley Kubrick. Octavo, original half cloth. Signed by Michael Herr on the title page. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Charles Rue Woods. Uncommon signed. The revolutionary artistry of Stanley Kubrick's films transformed the landscape of modern cinema. From the apocalyptic satire of Dr. Strangelove, to the epic vision of 2001: A Space Odyssey, to the dystopian nightmare of A Clockwork Orange, Kubrick produced a wide-ranging body of work cherished by film lovers the world over. But because of the moral complexity of his movies--and his meticulous style of filmmaking and legendary personal eccentricities--he was often misunderstood by colleagues and critics. This misunderstanding continued even after his death, in the critical controversy surrounding his final film Eyes Wide Shut. In Kubrick, author and screenwriter Michael Herr gives a personal look at the allegedly reclusive, compulsively brilliant director. He also recounts the evolution of their unique friendship, from their first meeting at a screening for The Shining in 1980, to their collaboration on the screenplay for Full Metal Jacket, through years of marathon phone conversations on topics ranging from film and technology to philosophy and literature--the last of which occurred just days before the director's death. Filled with personal insights and previously untold anecdotes, Michael Herr's Kubrick is a probing view into the director's inner life, capturing the creative passion and powerful intellect of one of the greatest filmmakers of all time.

$850.00

Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story.
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Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story.

By Reagan, Ronald

New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1965. First edition of Reagan's biography covering his years in Hollywood. Octavo, original black cloth, illustrated. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper in a contemporary hand, "To Harry With every good wish Ronald Reagan." Reagan has also corrected in his hand the word "Honey" opposite the title page to "Nancy." Near fine in a very good jacket. Jacket design Ned Glattauer. "Where's the rest of me" is Reagan’s famous line from the hit movie "King's Row". The release of his autobiography coincided with his run for the California governorship.

$2250.00

In the Track of Speed.
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In the Track of Speed.

By Moss, Stirling

New York: G. Putnam's Sons, 1957. First edition of this early work by the legendary driver. Octavo, original cloth, illustrated. Signed by Stirling Moss on the title page. Near fine in a very good dust jacket. Stirling Moss is a former Formula One racing driver. An inductee into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame, he won 212 of the 529 races he entered across several categories of competition and has been described as "the greatest driver never to win the World Championship". In a seven-year span between 1955 and 1961 Moss finished as championship runner-up four times and third the other three.

$350.00

All Things Possible: Setbacks and Success in Politics and Life.
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All Things Possible: Setbacks and Success in Politics and Life.

By Cuomo, Andrew M

New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 2014. First edition of the memoir by the fifty sixth governor of New York. Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated. Signed and dated by the author in the year of publication, "Andrew Cuomo 10/15/2014." Fine in a fine dust jacket. With photographs of the signing laid in.

$125.00

The Downing Street Years.
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The Downing Street Years.

By Thatcher, Margaret [Mikhail Gorbachev]

London: HarperCollins, 1993. First edition of Thatcher's autobiography. Octavo, original cloth, illustrated. Signed by Margaret Thatcher and Mikhail Gorbachev on the title page. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Margaret Thatcher became Britain's first woman Prime Minister in 1979, a post she held for eleven and a half years. She was leader of the Conservative Party for fifteen years, from 1975 to 1990. She was the only British Prime Minister of the twentieth century to win three consecutive general elections. Her partnership with President Ronald Reagan was the driving force of a conservative revolution that transformed the political landscape of the West, achieved a crushing defeat of Communism, and so brought liberty and prosperity within the grasp of millions who had never known them.

$2000.00

All But My Life: Face To Face With Ken W. Purdy.
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All But My Life: Face To Face With Ken W. Purdy.

By Moss, Stirling with Ken W. Purdy

London: William Kember, 1963. First edition of the racing legend's autobiography. Octavo, original cloth, illustrated. Lengthily signed by the author on the front free endpaper, "If you have time, try to understand why I am, as I am. Stirling." Near fine in a near fine dust jacket with light rubbing. Sir Stirling Moss was a British former Formula One racing driver. An inductee into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame, he won 212 of the 529 races he entered across several categories of competition and has been described as "the greatest driver never to win the World Championship". In a seven-year span between 1955 and 1961 Moss finished as championship runner-up four times and third the other three.

$650.00

More Leaves from the Journal of a Life in the Highlands.
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More Leaves from the Journal of a Life in the Highlands.

By Victoria, Queen

London: Smith, Elder, & Co, 1884. Early printing of this collection of excerpts from Queen Victoria's journals from Balmoral. Octavo, original green cloth with gilt titles and decorations to the spine and front panel, patterned endpapers, illustrated with engravings. Presentation copy, inscribed by Queen Victoria on the front free endpaper, "To Amy Lambart from VRI Windsor Castle May 22, 1884." The recipient, Amy Lambart was Maid of Honour to the Queen from 1877 to 1884. In near fine condition with light rubbing to the crown and foot of the spine. Rare and desirable with noted provenance. Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. From 1 May 1876, she had the additional title of Empress of India. Her reign of 63 years and seven months is known as the Victorian era. It was a period of industrial, cultural, political, scientific, and military change within the United Kingdom, and was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire. She was the last British monarch of the House of Hanover. Victoria wrote an average of 2,500 words a day during her adult life. From July 1832 until just before her death, she kept a detailed journal, which eventually encompassed 122 volumes. After Victoria's death, her youngest daughter, Princess Beatrice, was appointed her literary executor. Beatrice transcribed and edited the diaries covering Victoria's accession onwards, and burned the originals in the process. After the death of Prince Albert and the beginning of her long period of mourning, Victoria withdrew from public view. But she did not wholly vanish from public life, for she reappeared as an author through her published accounts of the world around Balmoral, her Scottish retreat and the backdrop for her great friendship with John Brown. Acquired by Prince Albert in 1852, the Balmoral Estate became the Royal couple's favorite summer home. Queen Victoria had a pyramid-shaped cairn erected in memory of the Prince on top of Craig Lurachain in 1862, one year after his death in 1861.

$1500.00

Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?
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Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?

By King Jr., Martin Luther

New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1967. First edition of King's "last grand expression of his vision" (Cornel West). Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated with eight pages of black-and-white photogravures. Presentation copy, inscribed by Martin Luther King, Jr. on the front free endpaper, "To Wilfred Cohen, In appreciation for your great support. Martin Luther King Jr." Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Ronald Clyne. Jacket photograph of Martin Luther King, Jr. by Bob Fitch. Where Do We Go from Here is Dr. King's analysis of the state of American race relations and the movement after a decade of U.S. civil rights struggles. ''With Selma and the Voting Rights Act one phase of development in the civil rights revolution came to an end,'' he observed (King, 3). King believed that the next phase in the movement would bring its own challenges, as African Americans continued to make demands for better jobs, higher wages, decent housing, an education equal to that of whites, and a guarantee that the rights won in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 would be enforced by the federal government.

$16000.00

Portrait of Myself.
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Portrait of Myself.

By Bourke-White, Margaret

New York: Simon and Schuster, 1963. First edition of American photographer Margaret Bourke-White's later autobiography. Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated. Signed by Margaret Bourke-White on the front free endpaper. Near fine in a very good dust jacket. Jacket photograph by Margaret Bourke-White. Jacket photograph of the author by Alfred Eisenstardt. Jacket design by Ken Brarer. American photographer and documentary photographer Margaret Bourke-White became the first American female war photojournalist in 1930 when she was the first foreign photographer permitted to take pictures of Soviet industry under the Soviet's five-year plan. Bourke-White's photograph of the construction of the Fort Peck Dam graced the cover of the first issue of Life Magazine dated November 23, 1936 which became the 1930s' representative in the United States Postal Service's Celebrate the Century series of commemorative postage stamps.

$125.00

A History of the English-Speaking Peoples.
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A History of the English-Speaking Peoples.

By Churchill, Winston S

London: Cassell and Company, 1956-1958. First British editions of each of the four volumes of this set. Octavo, 4 volumes, finely bound in three quarters morocco, gilt titles to the spine, raised bands, gilt ruled to the front and rear panels, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt. In very good condition. "Churchill’s last great work was published nearly 20 years after he penned its first draft in the late 1930s, just after wrapping up [the biography of] Marlborough. This enabled him to utilize the literary team he had assembled for the biography, to which he added dozens of outlines he had solicited from scholars In its final form the original single volume evolved to four, each of which was published simultaneously in Britain, the USA and Canada— a first for Churchill’s works" (Langworth, 312).

$1400.00

The Years of Lyndon Johnson: The Path To Power, Means of Ascent, Master of the Senate, Passage To Power.
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The Years of Lyndon Johnson: The Path To Power, Means of Ascent, Master of the Senate, Passage To Power.

By Caro, Robert A

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982-2012. First editions of each volume in the historian's ground-breaking biography on President Lyndon Johnson. Octavo, 4 volumes, original cloth. Each volume is signed by Robert Caro, with Means of Ascent an association copy, inscribed in the prior to publication by the author on the front free endpaper, "For Vicki and Loring- with deep affection from their friend, Robert A. Caro March 2, 1990." The recipients were close friends writers, Vicki Goldberg and Loring Eutemay. Also, laid in is a signed postcard by Caro to the same recipients. Each are fine in near fine to fine dust jackets. An exceptional set with noted provenance. "A monumental political saga . . . powerful and stirring. It's an overwhelming experience to read The Path to Power" (The New York Times). "Stands at the pinnacle of the biographical art" (Donald R. Morris, Houston Post).

$1600.00

Israel: A Personal History.
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Israel: A Personal History.

By Ben-Gurion, David

New York: Funk and Wagnalls Inc, 1971. Signed limited first edition, one of 2000 copies. Signed beneath the photographic frontispiece by David Ben-Gurion. Thick quarto, original full dark blue morocco, watered silk endpapers, top edge gilt. Fine in a fine slipcase. David Ben-Gurion's life has been so completely identified with Jewish history that "Israel: A Personal History" amounts to an autobiography. With this book, Ben-Gurion joins the small company of great historical figures who have left for posterity a personal record of the events in which they were prime movers.

$2000.00

The Lost Childhood and Other Essays.
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The Lost Childhood and Other Essays.

By Greene, Graham

London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1951. First edition of this collection of essays by Graham Greene, two of its four parts, Personal Prologue and Personal Postscript, comprise seven invaluable pieces of autobiography. Octavo, original cloth. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket.

$75.00

A River Runs Through It and Other Stories.
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A River Runs Through It and Other Stories.

By Maclean, Norman

Chicago: The University of Chicago, 1976. Early printing of Maclean's first book. Octavo, original cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, "University of Chicago June 14, 1979. To Jane and Hubert Will May wisdom and love always attend you, as they always have. Norman." Additionally signed by Robert Redford on the front free endpaper, "Times are better now with the advent of this book Best Robert Redford 10/4/92." The recipient Hubert Will was an alumnus of the University of Chicago and appointed by President John F. Kennedy to be a federal judge in the district for the Northern District of Illinois. Him and his wife were close friends of Maclean. Fine in a very good dust jacket. Rare and desirable signed by both Maclean and Redford. "[Maclean] would go to his grave secure in the knowledge that anyone who'd fished with a fly in the Rockies and read his novella on the how and why of it believed it to be the best such manual on the art ever written--a remarkable feat for a piece of prose that also stands as a masterwork in the art of tragic writing" (Philip Connors, The Nation). Adapted to the immensely successful film, directed by Robert Redford, starring Brad Pitt, Craig Sheffer and Tom Skerritt. It went on to win an Academy Award for Best Cinematography.

$2800.00

An American Life.
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An American Life.

By Reagan, Ronald [George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev]

New York: Simon & Schuster, 1990. First edition of the 40th President of the United States' memoir. Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the half-title page on the occasion of Reagan's 80th birthday, "Thank you Madeleine and Allen Paulson and Best Regards. Ronald Reagan Feb. 6- 1991" and additionally signed by George H.W. Bush, Vice President in the Reagan Administration and later President and Mikhail Gorbachev, Russian counterpart to Reagan. The recipient Allen Paulson was a business tycoon, founder of Gulfstream Aerospace, a successful thoroughbred breeder, and along with his wife Madeleine purchased The Del Mar Country Club in Rancho Santa Fe, California and friends of the Reagan's. "When it came to communism, socialism and other systems that denied people their basic human rights, President Reagan was tough as nails. A devoted anti-communist, he was not afraid to say what needed to be said or do what needed to be done to bring freedom to people who were living under repressive regimes. In that regard, of all the foreign policy achievements of the Reagan Presidency, none is more important, or had more lasting impact on the world, than the fundamental change in U.S.-Soviet relations. It was not due to luck or accident. Speaking of U.S.-Soviet relations and his steadfast determination to reduce arms, President Reagan would often say: "We don't mistrust each other because we're armed; we're armed because we mistrust each other." He believed that if the mistrust was eliminated, then so, too, could the dangerous, destabilizing weapons. President Reagan was confident that if he could just get his Soviet counterpart in a room and tell him face-to-face that America had no hostile intent, the mistrust would begin to evaporate. Instinctively he knew that could not be accomplished through the traditional diplomacy of a bureaucratic State Department. So, to the horror of some long-time career government employees, he did what no President had ever done. While recovering from the assassination attempt in 1981, he handwrote a letter to Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev in reply to Brezhnev's rather belligerent letter sent less than six weeks after President Reagan's assumption of office. In his reply, President Reagan sought to find common ground and to establish a better tone to relations between the White House and the Kremlin. But as things turned out, the President would have to be patient. Brezhnev died in November 1982, and was replaced by Yuri Andropov. Less than 2 years later, Andropov died, and was succeeded by Constantin Chernenko. Incredibly, Chernenko died just 13 months later. To replace him, the Soviet high command chose a younger leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. It was Gorbachev with whom President Reagan would finally have that long-sought opportunity to begin to form a new relationship, one that would lead to a lessening of tensions between Washington and Moscow, and eventually to meaningful arms reduction. The first of their five meetings was on "neutral turf." It took place in Geneva, Switzerland in November 1985. In a small plain boat house just down a stone path from Fleur D'Eau, the grand chateau where their formal sessions took place, President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev sat down in two comfortable chairs in front of a roaring fireplace, and with only interpreters present, began to forge a relationship that would not only improve U.S.-Soviet relations, but would turn out to be the beginning of the end of Soviet domination of Eastern Europe and ultimately, of the Soviet Union itself. Almost a year later, the two leaders got together again, this time in Reykjavik, Iceland. In a Summit meeting not long in the making, they met at Hofdi House, a picturesque waterfront structure that was once the French consulate. There they came tantalizingly close to an agreement to eliminate all medium-range missiles based in Europe. But at the last minute, Gorbachev insisted that the United States abandon plans for a space-based missile defense system. Despite President Reagan's offer to share the system's technology with the Soviet Union so that both countries could be protected, Gorbachev dug in his heels and would not budge. The last thing Ronald Reagan would ever do would be to risk America's safety for the sake of an agreement. The Summit was over. The anger and sadness was etched in President Reagan's face as he emerged from Hofdi House. There was chatter that this was the end of the Reagan-Gorbachev relationship, and that there would be no more Summits. But President Reagan knew better. Partly because of his natural optimism, and partly because he believed that Gorbachev shared his desire to make the world safer, he was certain that eventually talks would resume. The President directed his team to keep the dialogue going and to see whether the progress made in Reykjavik could be the basis for successful negotiations going forward. That's exactly what happened.It is a noteworthy measure of the confidence President Reagan had in the strength of his relationship with Gorbachev that just 8 months after Reykjavik, he boldly called on him to tear down the Berlin Wall. Just as he expected, in December, 1987, President and Mrs. Reagan welcomed the Gorbachevs to Washington for the third Summit. This time, the mood was upbeat and even celebratory. In a glittering East Room ceremony on December 8th, the two leaders signed the historic INF Treaty, eliminating all nuclear-armed ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges between 500 and 5,000 kilometers. For the first time ever, the amount of nuclear arms was actually being reduced rather than merely limited. In the Spring of 1988 the Reagans traveled to Moscow for Summit #4. From a historical perspective, the highlight of that trip was the Kremlin ceremony at which President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev signed the now-ratified INF Treaty, but the Reagans also found time to enjoy some cultural treats including the Bolshoi Ballet and a visit to a monastery. The final Summit during the Reagan Presidency was in December, 1988. In what some called a "handing off" of the official relationship, President Reagan and President-elect (Vice President) George Bush traveled to New York to meet with Gorbachev. The unlikely pairing of a devoted anti-Communist advocate of capitalism with a dyed-in-the-wool Marxist resulted not only in the most significant arms reduction treaty in history, but in a permanent change in U.S.-Soviet relations. Neither country, nor the world, would ever be the same again" (Reagan Foundation). Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Robert Anthony, Inc. Rare and desirable signed by Reagan, Bush and Gorbachev. "Reagan's charm, as displayed throughout this book, is incontestable; so is his grace under pressure" (San Francisco Chronicle).

$8800.00

The World Crisis 1911-1914.
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The World Crisis 1911-1914.

By Churchill, Winston S

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1928. True first edition of the first volume of Churchill's The World Crisis. Octavo, original cloth, illustrated with numerous maps (many folding), charts, facsimiles, photographs. Signed by Churchill on the front free endpaper, "Inscribed by Winston S. Churchill 20 Nov 1928." In fine condition. Churchill's American biographer William Manchester purported The World Crisis to be Churchill's masterpiece. The work was published over a period of eight years, resulting in a final six-volume, 3,261-page account of the Great War, beginning with its origins in 1911 and ending with its repercussions in the 1920s. Magnificently written, it is enhanced by the presence of the author at the highest councils of war and in the trenches as a battalion commander. In agreement with Manchester, British historian Robert Rhodes James wrote of the work: For all its pitfalls as history, The World Crisis must surely stand as Churchill’s masterpiece. As first lord of the admiralty and minister for war and air, Churchill stood resolute at the center of international affairs. In this classic account, he dramatically details how the tides of despair and triumph flowed and ebbed as the political and military leaders of the time navigated the dangerous currents of world conflict. Churchill vividly recounts the major campaigns that shaped the war: the furious attacks of the Marne, the naval maneuvers off Jutland, Verdun's "soul-stirring frenzy," and the surprising victory of Chemins des Dames. Here, too, he re-creates the dawn of modern warfare: the buzz of airplanes overhead, trench combat, artillery thunder, and the threat of chemical warfare. In Churchill's inimitable voice we hear how "the war to end all wars" instead gave birth to every war that would follow. "The World Crisis is at once an outstandingly readable history of the First World War -- the seminal drama of modern times -- and an eyewitness account, especially of its opening years. Whether as a statesman or an author, Churchill was a giant; and The World Crisis towers over most other books about the Great War" (David Fromkin). This comprehensive account of the War is both analytical and on occasions a justification from the author for his part in the proceedings. It is claimed that Churchill suggested this work was "not history, but a contribution to history." Since its publication both biographers and historians have considered it Churchill's masterpiece, eclipsing his better-known account 'The Second World War'; T. E. Lawrence regarded the second volume, 1915, as "far and away the best war-book I've yet read."

$8000.00

Operation Overflight: The U-2 Spy Pilot Tells His Story For The First Time.
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Operation Overflight: The U-2 Spy Pilot Tells His Story For The First Time.

By Powers, Francis Gary

New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1970. First edition of this classic spy memoir. Octavo, original cloth, illustrated. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the dedication page in the year of publication, "To Ralph Gustafson Best Wishes Francis Gary Powers 6-21-70." The recipient Ralph Gustafson was a Canadian poet and author. Near fine in a very good dust jacket. Jacket design by Jay Smith. Written with Curt Gentry. Signed first editions are uncommon. In this memoir about the notorious U-2 incident, pilot Francis Gary Powers reveals the full story of what actually happened in the most sensational espionage case in Cold War history. After surviving the shoot-down of his reconnaissance plane and his capture on May 1, 1960, Powers endured sixty-one days of rigorous interrogation by the KGB, a public trial, a conviction for espionage, and the start of a ten-year sentence. After nearly two years, the U.S. government obtained his release from prison in a dramatic exchange for convicted Soviet spy Rudolph Abel. The narrative is a tremendously exciting suspense story about a man who was labeled a traitor by many of his countrymen but who emerged a Cold War hero.

$650.00

An American Life.
seller photo

An American Life.

By Reagan, Ronald [Mikhail Gorbachev]

New York: Simon and Schuster, 1990. Signed limited first edition of President Reagan's autobiography, number 611 of 2000 copies signed by Reagan. Octavo, bound in elaborately gilt-decorated morocco, all edges gilt. Additionally signed by Mikhail Gorbachev, Russian counterpart to Reagan. "When it came to communism, socialism and other systems that denied people their basic human rights, President Reagan was tough as nails. A devoted anti-communist, he was not afraid to say what needed to be said or do what needed to be done to bring freedom to people who were living under repressive regimes. In that regard, of all the foreign policy achievements of the Reagan Presidency, none is more important, or had more lasting impact on the world, than the fundamental change in U.S.-Soviet relations. It was not due to luck or accident. Speaking of U.S.-Soviet relations and his steadfast determination to reduce arms, President Reagan would often say: "We don't mistrust each other because we're armed; we're armed because we mistrust each other." He believed that if the mistrust was eliminated, then so, too, could the dangerous, destabilizing weapons. President Reagan was confident that if he could just get his Soviet counterpart in a room and tell him face-to-face that America had no hostile intent, the mistrust would begin to evaporate. Instinctively he knew that could not be accomplished through the traditional diplomacy of a bureaucratic State Department. So, to the horror of some long-time career government employees, he did what no President had ever done. While recovering from the assassination attempt in 1981, he handwrote a letter to Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev in reply to Brezhnev's rather belligerent letter sent less than six weeks after President Reagan's assumption of office. In his reply, President Reagan sought to find common ground and to establish a better tone to relations between the White House and the Kremlin. But as things turned out, the President would have to be patient. Brezhnev died in November 1982, and was replaced by Yuri Andropov. Less than 2 years later, Andropov died, and was succeeded by Constantin Chernenko. Incredibly, Chernenko died just 13 months later. To replace him, the Soviet high command chose a younger leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. It was Gorbachev with whom President Reagan would finally have that long-sought opportunity to begin to form a new relationship, one that would lead to a lessening of tensions between Washington and Moscow, and eventually to meaningful arms reduction. The first of their five meetings was on "neutral turf." It took place in Geneva, Switzerland in November 1985. In a small plain boat house just down a stone path from Fleur D'Eau, the grand chateau where their formal sessions took place, President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev sat down in two comfortable chairs in front of a roaring fireplace, and with only interpreters present, began to forge a relationship that would not only improve U.S.-Soviet relations, but would turn out to be the beginning of the end of Soviet domination of Eastern Europe and ultimately, of the Soviet Union itself. Almost a year later, the two leaders got together again, this time in Reykjavik, Iceland. In a Summit meeting not long in the making, they met at Hofdi House, a picturesque waterfront structure that was once the French consulate. There they came tantalizingly close to an agreement to eliminate all medium-range missiles based in Europe. But at the last minute, Gorbachev insisted that the United States abandon plans for a space-based missile defense system. Despite President Reagan's offer to share the system's technology with the Soviet Union so that both countries could be protected, Gorbachev dug in his heels and would not budge. The last thing Ronald Reagan would ever do would be to risk America's safety for the sake of an agreement. The Summit was over. The anger and sadness was etched in President Reagan's face as he emerged from Hofdi House. There was chatter that this was the end of the Reagan-Gorbachev relationship, and that there would be no more Summits. But President Reagan knew better. Partly because of his natural optimism, and partly because he believed that Gorbachev shared his desire to make the world safer, he was certain that eventually talks would resume. The President directed his team to keep the dialogue going and to see whether the progress made in Reykjavik could be the basis for successful negotiations going forward. That's exactly what happened.It is a noteworthy measure of the confidence President Reagan had in the strength of his relationship with Gorbachev that just 8 months after Reykjavik, he boldly called on him to tear down the Berlin Wall. Just as he expected, in December, 1987, President and Mrs. Reagan welcomed the Gorbachevs to Washington for the third Summit. This time, the mood was upbeat and even celebratory. In a glittering East Room ceremony on December 8th, the two leaders signed the historic INF Treaty, eliminating all nuclear-armed ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges between 500 and 5,000 kilometers. For the first time ever, the amount of nuclear arms was actually being reduced rather than merely limited. In the Spring of 1988 the Reagans traveled to Moscow for Summit #4. From a historical perspective, the highlight of that trip was the Kremlin ceremony at which President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev signed the now-ratified INF Treaty, but the Reagans also found time to enjoy some cultural treats including the Bolshoi Ballet and a visit to a monastery. The final Summit during the Reagan Presidency was in December, 1988. In what some called a "handing off" of the official relationship, President Reagan and President-elect (Vice President) George Bush traveled to New York to meet with Gorbachev. The unlikely pairing of a devoted anti-Communist advocate of capitalism with a dyed-in-the-wool Marxist resulted not only in the most significant arms reduction treaty in history, but in a permanent change in U.S.-Soviet relations. Neither country, nor the world, would ever be the same again" (Reagan Foundation). In fine condition. "Reagan's charm, as displayed throughout this book, is incontestable; so is his grace under pressure" (San Francisco Chronicle).

$4800.00

Catch Me If You Can.
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Catch Me If You Can.

By Abagnale, Frank W. with Stan Redding

New York: Grosset & Dunlop, 1980. First edition of the bestselling true story of the world's most sought-after con man, basis for the Steven Spielberg film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks. Octavo, original black cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper in the year of publication, "To Sam with love, Frank W. Abagnale 6/10/80" and additionally signed by Steven Spielberg. Near fine in a near fine price-clipped dust jacket. When this true-crime story first appeared in 1980, it made the New York Times bestseller list within weeks. Two decades later, it's being rereleased in conjunction with a film version produced by DreamWorks. In the space of five years, Frank Abagnale passed $2.5 million in fraudulent checks in every state and 26 foreign countries. He did it by pioneering implausible and brazen scams, such as impersonating a Pan Am pilot (puddle jumping around the world in the cockpit, even taking over the controls). He also played the role of a pediatrician and faked his way into the position of temporary resident supervisor at a hospital in Georgia. Posing as a lawyer, he conned his way into a position in a state attorney general's office, and he taught a semester of college-level sociology with a purloined degree from Columbia University. The kicker is, he was actually a teenage high school dropout. Now an authority on counterfeiting and secure documents, Abagnale tells of his years of impersonations, swindles, and felonies with humor and the kind of confidence that enabled him to pull off his poseur performances. "Modesty is not one of my virtues. At the time, virtue was not one of my virtues," he writes. In fact, he did it all for his overactive libido--he needed money and status to woo the girls. He also loved a challenge and the ego boost that came with playing important men. What's not disclosed in this highly engaging tale is that Abagnale was released from prison after five years on the condition that he help the government write fraud-prevention programs. So, if you're planning to pick up some tips from this highly detailed manifesto on paperhanging, be warned: this master has already foiled you. It was the basis for the 2002 film directed and produced by Steven Spielberg from a screenplay by Jeff Nathanson, starring Leonard DiCaprio and Tom Hanks, with the music done by John Williams.

$1500.00

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