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CARD INSCRIBED AND SIGNED BY AMERICAN HUMORIST FRANK SULLIVAN CREATOR OF \
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CARD INSCRIBED AND SIGNED BY AMERICAN HUMORIST FRANK SULLIVAN CREATOR OF "MR. ARBUTHNOT THE CLICHE EXPERT".

By Sullivan, Frank. (1892-1976). American humorist, best remembered for creating the character "Mr. Arbuthnot the Cliche Expert"

Circa [11930s]., [11930s].. Very good.. - A 2 inch high by 3 inch wide card is inscribed in ink "Dear Miss Bowen / with pleasure" and signed "Frank Sullivan". The card is very lightly foxed. Very good. American humorist Frank Sullivan [1892-1976], born in Saratoga Springs, N. Y., worked for The Saratogian newspaper until he was drafted in 1917. After his discharge he moved to New York City and worked as a reporter and feature writer. He is best remembered as the creator of "Mr. Arbuthnot the Cliche Expert'. In one story, asked what he did for exercise, Mr. Arbuthnot replied: "I keep the wolf from the door, let the cat out of the bag, take the bull by the horns, count my chickens before they are hatched and see that the horse isn't put behind the cart or stolen before I lock the barn door."

$10.00

AUTOGRAPH: Close of a letter with sentiments SIGNED by the muckraking investigative journalist SAMUEL HOPKINS ADAMS who also penned several scandalous novels.

By Adams, Samuel Hopkins (1871-1958). Muckraking investigative journalist and author of then scandalous novels.

Hibernia, Florida, February 3, 1927., 1927.. Very good. - Samuel Hopkins Adams signature on a 1-1/4 inch high by 5 inch wide piece of paper clipped from the bottom of a letter. "Yours very truly / Samuel Hopkins Adams / Hibernia, Fla. Feb. 3d 1927". Three-quarters of the paper is darkened. There are remnants of mounting tape and a penciled note on the verso. Very good. The American writer and muckraking investigative journalist Samuel Hopkins Adams (1871-1958) started his career with the New York Sun. Moving on, his subsequent articles for McClure's magazine exposing the conditions of public health in the U.S. earned him a reputation as a muckraker. He worked with Lincoln Steffens, Ida Tarbell, and Ray Stannard Baker on McClure's editorial staff. Collier's hired him to prepare a series of 11 articles on patent medicine which were published as "The Great American Fraud". Although his articles led to the passing of the "Pure Food and Drug Act" in 1906, the Supreme Court later ruled that the prohibition of falsifications referred only to the ingredients in the medicine. Adams pursued the subject, wrote another series of articles and, in 1914, wrote "The Clarion", an article criticizing newspapers for printing advertisements for such medicines. Starting in the 1920's, Adams wrote several risque novels about young women "flappers" under the pseudonym of Warner Fabian. Bestsellers with Jazz Age youth, these novels freely explored the sexual urges of young women with shocking frankness. Many of these novels were subsequently made into movies. Colleen Moore starred in "Flaming Youth", Mary Astor in "Sailors' Wives", and Clara Bow in "The Wild Party".

$25.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED by the American magazine publisher GEORGE T. DELACORTE, JR. donating money to the \
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by the American magazine publisher GEORGE T. DELACORTE, JR. donating money to the "Dance Foundaton" with an additional AUTOGRAPH NOTE in his hand.

By Delacorte, George T. Jr. (1894-1991). NYC-born American magazine publisher and philanthropist.

New York, October 15, 1973., 1973.. Very good. - Over 45 words typed on his 10-5/8 inch high by 7-3/8 inch wide ivory white personal stationery. Enclosing a check as a donation to the "Dance Foundation", Delacorte playfully writes to his friend Jean Dalrymple that "I don't dance, Valerie doesn't dance, and I do not believe that I have been to the ballet for years." Signed "George" in blue ink. Delacorte has additionally penned an 18-word autograph note in blue ink as a postscript, "There will be a bronze plaque in City Center with your name on it. Talk to Elaine Felt". Folded for mailing with a crease to the bottom left corner and staple holes to the top left corner. Very good. The American magazine publisher George T. Delacorte, Jr. (1894-1991) founded the Dell Publishing Company in 1921 to entertain those who sought more than the "genteel" publications of the time. Dell became one of the largest publishers of books, magazines & comic books of the period. As a philanthropist, Delacorte donated money to his alma mater, Columbia University, establishing the Delacorte Professorship in the Humanities and the Center for Magazine Journalism. He donated funds to establish the Delacorte Theater in Central Park and financed the George Delacorte Musical Clock in the park as well as several sculptures and the fountain in City Hall Plaza.The recipient, Jean Dalrymple (1902-1998) was the dynamic producer and director of theater and light-opera at Manhattan's City Center. Dalrymple began her career in Vaudeville, appearing with James Cagney and Carey Grant in the early 1930s. She was a founding member of the American Theatre Wing, the theatre service organization. She worked over the years as a personal manager for the likes of Leopold Stokowski, Mary Martin, Jos Iturbi, Andre Kostalanetz, Nathan Milstein, and Lily Pons. She began her work at City Center with its founding in 1943, serving as a board member, producer, and publicist. Her productions there from the 1940s through the 1960s were a revitalizing influence on the whole New York theatre scene. In 1951, Jean Dalrymple married Major-General Philip deWitt Ginder, commander of the Thunderbirds in Korea. She was a friend to Presidents and entertainment personalities throughout the world.

$25.00

A SLIP OF PAPER SIGNED BY MARK SULLIVAN, A LEADING AMERICAN POLITICAL REPORTER AND COLUMNIST OF HIS DAY.
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A SLIP OF PAPER SIGNED BY MARK SULLIVAN, A LEADING AMERICAN POLITICAL REPORTER AND COLUMNIST OF HIS DAY.

By Sullivan, Mark. (1874-1952). An American author and journalist, he was the leading political reporter and columnist of his day.

Circa [1930's]., [1930's].. Good. - A slip of blue paper, approximately 1-3/4 inches high by 4 inches wide, is signed "Mark Sullivan",The top & bottom edges of the paper are uneven & the margins are darkened. Notes in another hand are penciled on the verso. Good. Mark Sullivan [1874-1952] was among the most widely respected journalists of his day. One of the original muckrakers, he became America's leading political reporter and columnist for nearly fifty years. A committed Republican, he had unequaled access to his party's leaders, including Presidents Roosevelt, Taft and Harding. Between 1926 and 1935 Sullivan wrote a major work of popular history, "Our Times", a six volume work covering the period 1900-1925 when, as he saw it, America emerged onto the world stage, triumphing in the Great War and then retreating into the materialism and self-absorption of the Twenties. Probably no other nonfiction series ever sold so well and was so widely read and acclaimed or had such a lasting reputation for excellence. [Information from Dan Rather, American Heritage, May/June 1996. Rather condensed Sullivan's "Our Times" into a new one-volume edition].

$25.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED by RUSSELL BAKER, to Jean Dalrymple, probably referring to one of his columns.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by RUSSELL BAKER, to Jean Dalrymple, probably referring to one of his columns.

By Baker, Russell (b.1925). American satirical writer, New York Times Columnist and Pulitzer Prize Winning author for "Growing Up".

New York, May 17, 1978., 1978.. Fine. - Over 50 words typed on his 8-1/2 inch high by 5-3/8 inch wide "The New York Times" stationery. Russell Baker thanks Jean Dalrymple for "letting me know that you liked THINGS THAT GO BUMP IN THE NIGHT. The sound you hear now is the grinding of the wheels in my head trying to figure out how you frightened that burglar." Signed "Russell Baker". Folded for mailing with minor soiling along the right edge. Near fine. The American satirical writer Russell Baker (b.1925) worked as a columnist for The New York Times from 1962 to 1998 and hosted Masterpiece Theatre from 1992 to 2004. He covered the White House, the US Congress and the US Department of State for the New York Times and wrote the nationally syndicated Observer column for the paper. The author of 17 books, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary for his Observer Columns in 1979. He was again a recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in 1982 for his autobiography "Growing Up".The recipient, Jean Dalrymple (1902-1998) was the dynamic producer and director of theater and light-opera at Manhattan's City Center. Dalrymple began her career in Vaudeville, appearing with James Cagney and Carey Grant in the early 1930s. She was a founding member of the American Theatre Wing, the theatre service organization. She worked over the years as a personal manager for the likes of Leopold Stokowski, Mary Martin, Jos Iturbi, Andre Kostalanetz, Nathan Milstein, and Lily Pons. She began her work at City Center with its founding in 1943, serving as a board member, producer, and publicist. Her productions there from the 1940s through the 1960s were a revitalizing influence on the whole New York theatre scene. In 1951, Jean Dalrymple married Major-General Philip deWitt Ginder, commander of the Thunderbirds in Korea. She was a friend to Presidents and entertainment personalities throughout the world.

$25.00

CUT SIGNATURE OF IRISH AMERICAN JOURNALIST AND FOUNDER OF THE IRISH WORLD NEWSPAPER PATRICK FORD.
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CUT SIGNATURE OF IRISH AMERICAN JOURNALIST AND FOUNDER OF THE IRISH WORLD NEWSPAPER PATRICK FORD.

By Ford, Patrick. (1837-1913). Irish American journalist, founder of the Irish World newspaper and Georgist land reformer.

Circa [1900]., [1900].. Fine. - A scrap of paper mounted on a 2-1/4 inch high by 3 inch wide card is signed in black ink "Patrick Ford". Fine. Patrick Ford [1837-1913] was an Irish American journalist. Born in Galway, Ireland, he emigrated with his parents to Boston in 1845, never returning to Ireland. After working as a printer's devil for two years, he started writing in 1851 and by 1861 was editor and publisher of the Boston Tribune. During the American Civil War he served in the Union forces, seeing action in northern Virginia and fighting at Fredericksburg. After the war he spent four years in Charleston editing the Southern Carolina Leader, published to support newly freed slaves. He settled in New York in 1870 and founded the Irish World, which became the principal newspaper of Irish America. Ford was pro-union, an abolitionist and a Georgist land reformer.

$45.00

A STRONGLY EVOCATIVE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH OF THE LEGENDARY BROADCAST JOURNALIST EDWARD R. MURROW.
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A STRONGLY EVOCATIVE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH OF THE LEGENDARY BROADCAST JOURNALIST EDWARD R. MURROW.

By (Murrow, Edward R. [1908-1965]). Harris, Martin.

[circa 1940's]., [circa 1940's].. Very good. - A 12-3/8 inch high by 8-1/4 inch wide black & white photograph of Edward R. Murrow on 14 inch high by 11 inch wide photo paper. The portrait depicts the legendary broadcast journalist Edward R. Murrow with his patterned tie loose, sleeves rolled up and the collar of his white shirt unbuttoned. Seated sideways, leaning attentively toward the camera, the pose emphasizes the dark suspenders holding up tweed pants. Depicted from the hips up, Murrow's right arm rests on the arm of the chair. His creased brow emphasizes his serious nature. This is one of a very few prints of a photograph by Martin Harris pulled from the original negative in the 1990's and offered for sale at a special fund-raising event. An auction sticker, with the number "96", is mounted on the verso. Near fine. <p>The American broadcast journalist Edward R. Murrow (1908-1965) was a war correspondent throughout the Second World War. He achieved fame for his series of live CBS radio broadcasts from Europe.<p>The photographer Martin Harris (1908-1971) worked for "Stars and Stripes" during the second World War. He later worked for "Look", "Life", "Colliers", and "The Saturday Evening Post" among other periodicals. Two of his photographs were selected as covers for "Life" magazine during his time with that periodical.

$250.00

TYPED LETTER TO JAMES B. POND SIGNED BY MARTIN EGAN, AMERICAN WAR CORRESPONDENT AND LONGTIME STAFF MEMBER OF J. P. MORGAN & CO.
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TYPED LETTER TO JAMES B. POND SIGNED BY MARTIN EGAN, AMERICAN WAR CORRESPONDENT AND LONGTIME STAFF MEMBER OF J. P. MORGAN & CO.

By Egan, Martin. (1872-1938). American war correspondent and journalist. From 1914 a staff member of J. P. Morgan & Company.

New York: November 2, 1933., 1933.. Very good. - 67 words typed on an 11-inch high by 8-1/2 inch wide cream-colored sheet of note paper with J. P. Morgan's Wall Street address printed at top left. Signed "Martin Egan". There is a small very light stain at top right. Folded 3 times for mailing. Near fine. Egan writes to James B. Pond of the Pond Lecture Bureau regretting that he and his wife are unable to accept Pond's invitation to attend actress Dorothy Sands' show.Martin Egan [1872-1938] was an American journalist who wrote for newspapers and magazines in America and Canada and for the Associated Press in New York, London, Tokyo, Peking and Manila. He was a correspondent during the Spanish-American War, the Philippine Insurrection, the Boxer Uprising and the Russo-Japanese War. He edited the Manila Times from 1908 to 1913. He was personal assistant to H. P. Davison, Chairman of the American Red Cross War Council in 1917 and an aide to General Pershing in 1918. For the last twenty-five years of his life he was on the staff of banking house J. P. Morgan and Company.

$75.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY JOSEPH J. EARLY, PUBLISHER OF THE BROOKLYN TIMES UNION, SENDING HIS AUTOGRAPH TO A FUTURE CONGRESSMAN.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY JOSEPH J. EARLY, PUBLISHER OF THE BROOKLYN TIMES UNION, SENDING HIS AUTOGRAPH TO A FUTURE CONGRESSMAN.

By Early, Joseph J. (d. 1949). Publisher of the Brooklyn Times Union (1924-27).

Brooklyn, NY: December 10, 1936., 1936.. Good. - Typed letter filling most of an 11 inch high by 8-1/2 inch wide cream-colored sheet of Brooklyn Times Union letterhead. Signed "Joseph J. Early". The edges & corners of the letter are lightly creased & its bottom edge is darkened. There are a few short tears to the edges & a small piece out at bottom right. Folded twice for mailing. Good. Early sends a warm letter and his autograph to future congressman Seymour Halpern, then a young autograph collector. Halpern is the son of an old friend of Early: "Be sure to give my kindest regards to your good Father. He is a gem. He was one of my valued and old friends at Albany and while we see each other seldom, I value him highly and you are a lucky chap to be his son". Early also encourages Halpern in his pursuit of a career.Joseph J. Early served as president of the Legislative Correspondents Association in Albany in 1912. He was the president and publisher of The Brooklyn Times Union from 1924 to 1927. He later served as legislative representative for the New York State Publishers Association and the Associated Dailies of New York State. He died in 1949.The Queens, New York Republican Congressman Seymour Halpern (1913-1997) started his political career as a campaign aide to New York's powerful mayor Fiorella La Guardia and first served in New York's State Senate for 14 years before seeking a seat in the U.S. Congress. In Albany Halpern sponsored 279 bills that became law, including measures on schools, housing, civil rights, nutrition and mental health. A Liberal, he was something of an anomaly as the lone Republican representative from New York City, and generally garnered support from Labor Unions and endorsement from the Liberal Party. Yet he never even considered switching parties as he considered membership in the Republican Party a family tradition and commitment. While he found ample time for his private pursuits, including painting and collecting autographs, he took his legislative duties very seriously. Of these, he was proudest of his co-sponsorship of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and of the original 1965 Medicare legislation.

$10.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY AMERICAN RADIO JOURNALIST AND ASSOCIATE EDITOR OF COLLIER\'S MAGAZINE JOHN B. KENNEDY, SOLICITING A LECTURE PLATFORM.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY AMERICAN RADIO JOURNALIST AND ASSOCIATE EDITOR OF COLLIER'S MAGAZINE JOHN B. KENNEDY, SOLICITING A LECTURE PLATFORM.

By Kennedy, John B. (1894-1961). American radio journalist and Associate Editor of Collier's magazine.

New York: August 30, 1926., 1926.. Very good. - 112 words typed on a cream-colored 10-7/8 inch high by 8-3/8 inch wide sheet of Collier's letterhead. Signed "John B. Kennedy". There is some very light soiling & creasing to the letter with a small tear & 2 pinholes to the top edge. Folded 3 times for mailing. Very good. Kennedy writes to James B. Pond of the Pond Lecture Bureau in New York City that he does not pretend to be a lecturer "though I have done a good deal of this sort of work. I wonder whether you can see anything in it for both of us....I like to talk on literary subjects, but it is not much trouble for me to prepare something interesting on almost any topic that is covered by a popular magazine."John B. Kennedy [1894-1961] was an American radio correspondent, journalist and film narrator. He was an Associate Editor of Collier's magazine.

$10.00

PORTRAIT OF JAMES LOUIS GARVIN, EDITOR OF THE BRITISH NEWSPAPER THE OBSERVER, INSCRIBED AND SIGNED BY HIM.
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PORTRAIT OF JAMES LOUIS GARVIN, EDITOR OF THE BRITISH NEWSPAPER THE OBSERVER, INSCRIBED AND SIGNED BY HIM.

By Garvin, James Louis. (1868-1947). British journalist, editor and author. Editor of The Observer from 1908 to 1942.

Beaconsfield, Bucks., U.K.: 26 March, 1930., 1930.. Fine. - A 4-3/8 inch high by 3-1/4 inch wide black-and-white photographic portrait clipped from a magazine is mounted on an approximately 6 inch high by 4 inch wide cream-colored card. Inscribed and signed on the mount in black ink above and below the photo: "To Seymour Halpern / J. L. Garvin / 26 March 1930 / Gregories / Beaconsfield". Fine. A head-and shoulders portrait of Garvin seated at a desk with his arms folded over a pile of papers. The photo is inscribed to future Congressman Seymour Halpern, then a young autograph collector.James Louis Garvin [1868-1947] was a British journalist, editor and author. Garvin, who had always wanted to be an editor, was given a job as a proof reader and occasional contributor at the Newcastle Evening Chronicle. In 1908, after years of honing his skills as a journalist at various newspapers and moving to London, he accepted the editorship of the British Sunday newspaper The Observer. He revolutionized Sunday journalism and returned the paper, which was facing financial troubles at the time, to profitability. In 1921, Garvin moved to Beaconsfield, continuing to edit The Observer and starting work on a biography of his hero Joseph Chamberlain. After Churchill, an old friend, became Prime Minister in 1940, Garvin offered him unstinting support. This led to disagreements with the proprietors, the Astor family, who asked him to resign. He continued writing weekly columns, first for the Sunday Express and then the Daily Telegraph until shortly before his death in 1947.The Queens, New York Republican Congressman Seymour Halpern (1913-1997) started his political career as a campaign aide to New York's powerful mayor Fiorella La Guardia and first served in New York's State Senate for 14 years before seeking a seat in the U.S. Congress. In Albany Halpern sponsored 279 bills that became law, including measures on schools, housing, civil rights, nutrition and mental health. A Liberal, he was something of an anomaly as the lone Republican representative from New York City, and generally garnered support from Labor Unions and endorsement from the Liberal Party. Yet he never even considered switching parties as he considered membership in the Republican Party a family tradition and commitment. While he found ample time for his private pursuits, including painting and collecting autographs, he took his legislative duties very seriously. Of these, he was proudest of his co-sponsorship of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and of the original 1965 Medicare legislation.

$75.00

TYPED LETTER TO EDUCATOR HAROLD RUGG SIGNED BY JEWISH AMERICAN JOURNALIST LOUIS FISCHER.
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TYPED LETTER TO EDUCATOR HAROLD RUGG SIGNED BY JEWISH AMERICAN JOURNALIST LOUIS FISCHER.

By Fischer, Louis. (1896-1970). Jewish American journalist and author who worked for The Nation.

New York: October 4, 1950., 1950.. Very good. - 65 words typed on a 9-3/8 inch high by 6 inch wide sheet of Hotel Duane letterhead. Signed "Louis Fischer". Together with an unsigned carbon copy of Rugg's reply. The top left corner of Fischer's letter is lightly creased with 2 pinholes where it has been stapled to Rugg's reply. Very good. Fischer replies to an invitation from Rugg to speak at one of Rugg's luncheon forums at Teachers College of Columbia University. He also writes "Your praise of my Gandhi book is very heartening. This is the real recompense for the work and heart one puts into such a task". Fischer's "The Life of Mahatma Gandhi" on which the Academy Award-winning film was based was published in 1950. Rugg replies confirming the date Fischer has suggested for the talk.Louis Fischer [1896-1970] was a Jewish American journalist. Between 1917 and 1938, Fischer spent periods abroad, joining the Jewish Legion military unit based in Palestine and, while working for the New York Evening Post and The Nation, was in Berlin and Moscow. He also covered the Spanish Civil War and for a time was a member of the International Brigade. He was initially sympathetic to Communism, attracting criticism for supporting the Soviet denial of the 1932-33 famine in Ukraine. Subsequently his disillusion with Communism was reflected in his contribution to "The God That Failed" [1949]. In 1938 he settled in New York City and continued working for The Nation. Among his published works were an autobiography "Men in Politics" and books on the Soviet Union, Stalin, Lenin and the Spanish Civil War.Harold Rugg [1886-1960] was a professor of education at Teachers College of Columbia University. A civil engineer, he became interested in how students learn and pursued a doctorate in education. He was responsible for producing the first series of school textbooks from 1929 until the 1940s.

$75.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER ON PICTORIAL LETTERHEAD SIGNED BY CO-FOUNDER OF THE NEW YORK TIMES HENRY JARVIS RAYMOND.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER ON PICTORIAL LETTERHEAD SIGNED BY CO-FOUNDER OF THE NEW YORK TIMES HENRY JARVIS RAYMOND.

By Raymond, Henry Jarvis. (1820-1869). Journalist and politician who was a co-founder of the New York Times.

New York: January 15, 1859., 1859.. Very good. - 34 words penned in black ink on a cream sheet of 9-3/4 inch high by 7-5/8 inch wide sheet of Times Office letterhead with a handsome engraving of the Times building at top left. Signed "W. J. Raymond". The bottom edge of the letter is slightly darkened with some light creasing. Once mounted into an album with paper remnants adhering to the corners of an integral attached blank leaf. A couple of small chips are torn from the corners of the blank. Folded 3 times for mailing. Very good. <p>Raymond writes agreeing to an exchange with another publication: "We shall be very happy to send you our semi-weekly Edition in Exchange for the W. & R. We would send the Daily but for the fact that our Exchange list is already inconveniently large."<p>Henry Jarvis Raymond [1820-1869] was an American journalist and politician and co-founder of the New York Times. Between 1841 and 1851 he worked as a journalist and associate editor for various newspapers, including Horace Greeley's New York Tribune and James Watson Webb's Courier and Enquirer. In 1851 Raymond convinced George Jones, who had also worked at the Tribune, to become his partner and publish a new paper that would report the news in a neutral manner. They co-founded the New York Times and Raymond edited the paper until his death. Raymond was a member of the New York State Assembly in 1850 and 1851 and was elected Speaker in 1851. A member of the Whig party's northern radical anti-slavery wing, he was nominated for Lieutenant Governor of New York in 1854 over Horace Greeley. He was elected and served from 1855 to 1856. Raymond has sometimes been called "the godfather of the Republican Party". He played a prominent role in the party's formation and drafted the Address to the People adopted by the Republican organizing convention in 1856.

$250.00

TYPED LETTER TO CITY CENTER PRODUCER JEAN DALRYMPLE SIGNED BY NEW YORK POST PUBLISHER DOROTHY SCHIFF, NEW YORK'S FIRST FEMALE NEWSPAPER PUBLISHER.
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TYPED LETTER TO CITY CENTER PRODUCER JEAN DALRYMPLE SIGNED BY NEW YORK POST PUBLISHER DOROTHY SCHIFF, NEW YORK'S FIRST FEMALE NEWSPAPER PUBLISHER.

By Schiff, Dorothy. (1903-1989). Publisher of the New York Post, New York's first female newspaper publisher.

New York: May 19, 1969., 1969.. Very good. - 26 words typed on a sheet of 9-1/2 inch high by 6-inch wide cream-colored sheet of New York Post letterhead with the address and "Office of the President " printed at the top. Signed "Dorothy Schiff". The corners of the letter are lightly creased. Folded twice for mailing. Very good. <p>Schiff writes to Jean Dalrymple thanking her for sending a copy of her new book "Careers and Opportunities in the Theatre" and hoping it becomes a best seller.<p>Dorothy Schiff [1903-1989] was an owner and then the leftist publisher of the New York Post for nearly forty years. She was a granddaughter of financier Jacob Schiff. She was interested in social services and reform and was involved in several welfare groups. Schiff sold the Post to Rupert Murdoch in 1976. It was believed she was pessimistic about the future of New York afternoon papers, and she was also concerned about the effect of owning the paper on the value of her estate.

$150.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO LEEDS MERCURY EDITOR THOMAS WEMYSS REID SIGNED BY SCOTTISH JOURNALIST JAMES MACDONELL.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO LEEDS MERCURY EDITOR THOMAS WEMYSS REID SIGNED BY SCOTTISH JOURNALIST JAMES MACDONELL.

By Macdonell, James. (1841-1879). Scottish journalist, author of posthumously published "France Since the First Empire".

[London]: November 16, 1874., 1874.. Very good. - Letter penned in black ink & filling both sides of a sheet of black-bordered, 7 inch high by 4-3/8 inch wide cream paper. Signed "James Macdonell". Folded twice for mailing. Very good. <p>Macdonell writes to Thomas Wemyss Reid, editor of the Leeds Mercury. He apologizes at length for not having answered a note from Reid which arrived while Macdonell was away in the Highlands. He goes on to describe his current busy life as a journalist, mentioning "I am also gathering the material for a big book" [probably his book on France]. "But I have almost abandoned the hope of being able to write anything of that kind until I shall have freed myself from the shackles of my journalism."<p>Scottish journalist James Macdonell [1841-1879] began by writing for the Aberdeen Free Press in his native city and at the age of 22 became editor of the Northern Daily Express. He moved to London in 1865 to take up a staff position at the Daily Telegraph, which he held until 1875, serving as special correspondent in France in 1870 and 1871. He became a leader writer on the Times of London in 1873. His posthumous "France since the First Empire" was incomplete at his death but yielded insights into the French politics of his time.

$50.00

THE SWEDISH PRESS.
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THE SWEDISH PRESS.

By Pers, Anders Yngve.

Stockholm: The Swedish Institute, 1966., 1966.. Very good. - Octavo, softcover bound in folding pictorial wrappers. There is some minor foxing & soiling to the binding. 46 pages. Illustrated with tables & diagrams, including 1 folding table. Very good. <p>The text is translated into English from the Swedish manuscript.

$15.00

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES ON BOSTON NEWSPAPERS 1704-1780.

By Matthews, Albert.

Cambridge, MA: John Wilson and Son, 1907., 1907.. Fair. - Octavo, printed gray wraps. The spine is perished. The wraps are heavily chipped & detached. 527 pp. Minor creasing & soiling. The contents are very good and well worth rebinding. <p>Reprinted from the publications of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Volume IX.<p>Laid in is a TLS from the author to a Mr. Sargent, encouraging him to mention the publication in his column.

$20.00

CLOSE OF A LETTER SIGNED BY AMERICAN NEWSPAPER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR HERMAN RIDDER.
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CLOSE OF A LETTER SIGNED BY AMERICAN NEWSPAPER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR HERMAN RIDDER.

By Ridder, Herman. (1851-1915). American newspaper publisher and editor.

Circa [1900]., [1900].. Good. - "Yours faithfully" is typed in blue ink on a slip of paper 1-1/2 inches high by 4-1/4 inches wide. Boldly signed in black ink: "Herman Ridder". The top edge of the paper is slightly unevenly cut & there is a small, light stain at bottom left. Good. <p>Herman Ridder [1851-1915] was born in New York City of German Catholic parents. He established the Katholisches Volksblatt in 1878 and the Catholic News in 1886. In 1890 he became trustee and manager and in 1907 president of the New Yorker Staats-Zeitung, then the largest and most influential German-language newspaper in the United States. He came into conflict with the Federal authorities after the outbreak of World War I, charged with having carried on an alleged pro-German campaign in his newspapers. He died insolvent, having lost his means with the failure of the International Typesetting Machine Company at the start of the war.

$25.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY THE PUBLISHER OF THE NEW YORK JOURNAL-AMERICAN SEYMOUR BERKSON.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY THE PUBLISHER OF THE NEW YORK JOURNAL-AMERICAN SEYMOUR BERKSON.

By Berkson, Seymour. (1905-1959). Publisher of the New York Journal-American.

New York: October 11, 1957.. 1957.. Very good. - 35 words typed on a cream-colored, 10-1/2 inch high by 7-1/4 inch wide sheet of New York Journal and American letterhead with "Office of the Publisher" printed below the address. Signed "Seymour Berkson". There is a light crease to the upper left margin of the letterhead with some very light creasing to the bottom edge. Folded twice for mailing. Very good. <p>Berkson accepts an invitation from Edward Hirtenstein of the Insurist Corporation of America to attend "the cocktail party in honor of my good friend, Seymour Halpern at the 21 Club on Tuesday, October 22."<p>Seymour Berkson [1905-1959] was born and educated in Chicago, From his schooldays, he was interested in newspaper work. He advanced through the ranks from reporter to vice president and general manager of the International News Service before being named publisher of the New York Journal-American. He was active in civic affairs and in 1958 served as chairman of the newspaper committee for Brotherhood week, the national observance sponsored by the National Conference of Christians and Jews.<p>The Queens, New York Republican Congressman Seymour Halpern (1913-1997) started his political career as a campaign aide to New York's powerful mayor Fiorella La Guardia and first served in New York's State Senate for 14 years before seeking a seat in the U.S. Congress. In Albany Halpern sponsored 279 bills that became law, including measures on schools, housing, civil rights, nutrition and mental health. A Liberal, he was something of an anomaly as the lone Republican representative from New York City, and generally garnered support from Labor Unions and endorsement from the Liberal Party. Yet he never even considered switching parties as he considered membership in the Republican Party a family tradition and commitment. While he found ample time for his private pursuits, including painting and collecting autographs, he took his legislative duties very seriously. Of these, he was proudest of his co-sponsorship of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and of the original 1965 Medicare legislation.

$35.00

PORTRAIT INSCRIBED TO NEW YORK POLITICIAN SEYMOUR HALPERN AND SIGNED BY NEWSPAPER PROPRIETOR HAROLD HARMSWORTH, 1ST VISCOUNT ROTHERMERE.
seller photo

PORTRAIT INSCRIBED TO NEW YORK POLITICIAN SEYMOUR HALPERN AND SIGNED BY NEWSPAPER PROPRIETOR HAROLD HARMSWORTH, 1ST VISCOUNT ROTHERMERE.

By Harmsworth, Harold, 1st Viscount Rothermere. (1868-1940). Highly successful British newspaper proprietor and pioneer of popular journalism.

Circa [1930].. [1930].. Very good. - Sepia-toned portrait, 5-3/4 inches high by 3-3/4 inches wide, clipped from a magazine and mounted on a sheet of cream card, approximately 7 inches high by 4-1/4 inches wide. Inscribed below the photograph and signed "Rothermere". The mount is very lightly creased at top left & its bottom right corner is slightly bumped. Near fine. <p>Harmsworth is photographed at waist length, wearing a high-necked brocaded waistcoat with his left hand apparently resting on the hilt of a sword. The portrait is inscribed "To Seymour Halpern / with best wishes / Rothermere".<p>Harold Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere [1868-1940] was a highly successful newspaper proprietor, owner of Associated Newspapers Ltd. He was a pioneer of popular journalism and, together with his brother Alfred Harmsworth, developed the Daily Mail and the Daily Mirror, During the 1930s he was known to be a supporter of Nazi Germany.<p>The Queens, New York Republican Congressman Seymour Halpern (1913-1997) started his political career as a campaign aide to New York's powerful mayor Fiorella La Guardia and first served in New York's State Senate for 14 years before seeking a seat in the U.S. Congress. In Albany Halpern sponsored 279 bills that became law, including measures on schools, housing, civil rights, nutrition and mental health. A Liberal, he was something of an anomaly as the lone Republican representative from New York City, and generally garnered support from Labor Unions and endorsement from the Liberal Party. Yet he never even considered switching parties as he considered membership in the Republican Party a family tradition and commitment. While he found ample time for his private pursuits, including painting and collecting autographs, he took his legislative duties very seriously. Of these, he was proudest of his co-sponsorship of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and of the original 1965 Medicare legislation.

$75.00

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