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Middle Eastern History

From From Beirut To Jerusalem to Masada, from A History Of the Arab Peoples to The Blood Of Abraham, we can help you find the middle eastern history books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.co.uk, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.


Top Sellers in Middle Eastern History

    From Beirut To Jerusalem by Thomas L Friedman

    The New York Times Middle East correspondent profiles this troubled region, describing the everyday horrors of Beirut, the intricacies of Arab politics, Arab-Israeli relations, and American perceptions of the region.


    Peace To End All Peace by David Fromkin

    Featuring a new afterword offering an updated assessment of the region, a twentieth anniversary edition of the acclaimed study of the Middle East traces the influence of the Allies on Middle East politics during and after World War I and the legacy of the era on the shifting political unities and divisions of today.


    Leap Of Faith by Queen Noor

    rt of a man and his nation. Born into a distinguished Arab-American family, Lisa Halaby was a strongly independent young woman. After studying architecture at Princeton, her work on projects in the Middle East gave her a profound understanding both of the links between the environment and social problems, and also of the tumultuous history of the Arab nations. Then, in 1974, her life took a very different turn, when her father introduced her to the world's most eligible bachelor, King Hussein of Jordan. After a whirlwind romance, she became Noor Al Hussein, Queen of Jordan. With eloquence and honesty, Queen Noor speaks of the obstacles she faced as a young bride and of her successful struggle to create a role for herself as a humanitarian activist. She tells of her heartbreaking miscarriage and the births of her four children, along with her continuing support for King Hussein's campaign to bring peace to the Arab nations. But most of all this is a love story - an honest and engaging portrait of a truly remarkable woman and the man she married.


    The Burning Tigris by Peter Balakian

    The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response presents a narrative of the massacres of the Armenians during the 1890s and genocide in 1915 at the responsibility of the Ottoman government. Using archival documents and first-person accounts, Peter Balakian shows the history of how the Young Turks were involved in the Armenian Genocide. The book received the 2005 Raphael Lemkin Prize and was a New York Times Notable Book and New York Times and national best seller.


    Bible and Sword by Barbara W Tuchman

    Barbara W. Tuchman (1912–1989) achieved prominence as a historian with The Zimmermann Telegram and international fame with The Guns of August —a huge bestseller and winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Her other works include Bible and Sword, The Proud Tower, Stilwell and the American Experience in China (for which Tuchman was awarded a second Pulitzer Prize), Notes from China, A Distant Mirror, Practicing History, The March of Folly, and The First Salute .


    What Went Wrong? - Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response by Bernard Lewis

    For many centuries, the world of Islam was in the forefront of human achievement--the foremost military and economic power in the world, the leader in the arts and sciences of civilization. Christian Europe, a remote land beyond its northwestern frontier, was seen as an outer darkness of barbarism and unbelief from which there was nothing to learn or to fear. And then everything changed, as the previously despised West won victory after victory, first in the battlefield and the marketplace, then in almost every aspect of public and even private life. In this intriguing volume, Bernard Lewis examines the anguished reaction of the Islamic world as it tried to understand why things had changed--how they had been overtaken, overshadowed, and to an increasing extent dominated by the West. Lewis provides a fascinating portrait of a culture in turmoil. He shows how the Middle East turned its attention to understanding European weaponry and military tactics, commerce and industry, government and diplomacy, education and culture. Lewis highlights the striking differences between the Western and Middle Eastern cultures from the 18th to the 20th centuries through thought-provoking comparisons of such things as Christianity and Islam, music and the arts, the position of women, secularism and the civil society, the clock and the calendar.Hailed in The New York Times Book Review as "the doyen of Middle Eastern studies," Bernard Lewis is one of the West's foremost authorities on Islamic history and culture. In this striking volume, he offers an incisive look at the historical relationship between the Middle East and Europe.


    Six Days Of War by Michael B Oren

    Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East is a 2002 non-fiction book by American-Israeli historian Michael Oren, chronicling the events of the Six-Day War fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors. Widely praised by critics, the book won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for history and spent seven weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list.


    Power, Faith and Fantasy by Michael B Oren

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [693]-741 and index.


    Islamic Imperialism by Efraim Karsh

    From the first Arab-Islamic Empire of the mid-seventh century to the Ottomans, the last great Muslim empire, the story of the Middle East has been the story of the rise and fall of universal empires and, no less important, of imperialist dreams. So argues Efraim Karsh in this highly provocative book. Rejecting the conventional Western interpretation of Middle Eastern history as an offshoot of global power politics, Karsh contends that the region's experience is the culmination of long-existing indigenous trends, passions and patterns of behaviour, and that foremost among these is Islam's millenarian imperial tradition. The author explores the history of Islam's imperialism and the persistence of the Ottoman imperialist dream that outlasted World War I to haunt Islamic and Middle Eastern politics to the present day. September 11 can be seen as simply the latest expression of this dream, and such attacks have little to do with U.S. international behaviour or policy in the Middle East, says Karsh. The House of Islam's war for world mastery is traditional, indeed venerable, and it is a quest that is far from over.


    A Savage War Of Peace by Alistair Horne

    ALISTAIR HORNE is the author of eighteen previous books, including A Savage War of Peace: Algeria 1954—1962 , The Price of Glory: Verdun 1916 , How Far from Austerlitz?: Napoleon 1805—1815 and the official biography of British prime minister Harold Macmillan. He is a fellow at St. Anthony’s College, Oxford, and lives in Oxfordshire. He was awarded the French Legion d’Honneur in 1993 and received a knighthood in 2003 for his work on French history.  


    The Punishment Of Virtue by Sarah Chayes

    As a former star reporter for NPR, Sarah Chayes developed a devoted listenership for her on-site reports on conflicts around the world. In The Punishment of Virtue , she reveals the misguided U.S. policy in Afghanistan in the wake of the defeat of the Taliban, which has severely undermined the effort to build democracy and allowed corrupt tribal warlords back into positions of power and the Taliban to re-infiltrate the country. This is an eyeopening chronicle that highlights the often infuriating realities of a vital front in the war on terror, exposing deeper, fundamental problems with current U.S. strategy.


    From Babel To Dragomans by Bernard Lewis

    Bernard Lewis is recognized around the globe as one of the leading authorities on Islam. Hailed as "the world's foremost Islamic scholar" (Wall Street Journal), as "a towering figure among experts on the culture and religion of the Muslim world" (Baltimore Sun), and as "the doyen of Middle Eastern studies" (New York Times), Lewis is nothing less than a national treasure, a trusted voice that politicians, journalists, historians, and the general public have all turned to for insight into the Middle East. Now, this revered authority has brought together writings and lectures that he has written over four decades, featuring his reflections on Middle Eastern history and foreign affairs, the Iranian Revolution, the state of Israel, the writing of history, and much more. The essays cover such urgent and compelling topics as "What Saddam Wrought," "Deconstructing Osama and His Evil Appeal," "The Middle East, Westernized Despite Itself," "The Enemies of God," and "Can Islam be Secularized?" The collection ranges from two English originals of articles published before only in foreign languages, to previously unpublished writings, to his highly regarded essays from publications such as Foreign Affairs and The New York Review of Books. With more than fifty pieces in all, plus a new introduction to the book by Lewis, this is a valuable collection for everyone interested in the Middle East. Here then is a rich repository of wisdom on one of the key areas of the modern world--a wealth of profound reflections on Middle Eastern history, culture, politics, and current events.


    The Middle East by Bernard Lewis

    In a sweeping and vivid survey, renowned historian Bernard Lewis charts the history of the Middle East over the last 2,000 years, from the birth of Christianity through the modern era, focusing on the successive transformations that have shaped it. Elegantly sritten, scholarly yet accessible, The Middle East is the most comprehensive single volume history of the region ever written from the world's foremost authority on the Middle East.


    Lords Of the Horizons by Jason Goodwin

    The Ottoman Empire has exerted a long, strong pull on Western minds and hearts. For over six hundred years the Empire swelled and declined; rising from a dusty fiefdom in the foothills of Anatolia to a power which ruled over the Danube and the Euphrates with the richest court in Europe. But its decline was prodigious, protracted, and total. Lords of the Horizons charts the Ottoman Empire's swirling history; dramatic, detailed and alive - a journey, and a world all in one.


    A History Of the Arab Peoples by Albert Hourani

    In a bestselling work of profound and lasting importance, the late Albert Hourani told the definitive history of the Arab peoples from the seventh century, when the new religion of Islam began to spread from the Arabian peninsula westwards, to the present day. It is a masterly distillation of a lifetime of scholarship and a unique insight into a perpetually troubled region. This updated edition by Malise Ruthven adds a substantial new chapter which includes recent events such as 9/11, the US invasion of Iraq and its bloody aftermath, the fall of the Mubarak and Ben Ali regimes in Egypt and Tunisia, and the incipient civil war in Syria, bringing Hourani's magisterial history up to date. Ruthven suggests that while Hourani can hardly have been expected to predict in detail the massive upheavals that have shaken the Arab world recently he would not have been entirely surprised, given the persistence of the kin-patronage networks he describes in his book and the challenges now posed to them by a new media-aware generation of dissatisfied youth. In a new biographical preface, Malise Ruthven shows how Hourani's perspectives on Arab history were shaped by his unique background as an English-born Arab Christian with roots in the Levant.


    The Great War For Civilisation by Robert Fisk

    Best-selling author and journalist Robert Fisk, based in Beirut as Middle East Correspondent of The Independent , has lived in the Middle East for almost three decades and holds more British and international journalism awards than any other foreign correspondent. His last book, Pity the Nation , a history of the Lebanon war, was published to great critical acclaim.


    By Way Of Deception by Victor; Hoy, Claire Ostrovsky

    By way of deception: The making and unmaking of a Mossad Officer is a book written by Victor Ostrovsky and Claire Hoy about Ostrovsky's career as a katsa in the Israeli Mossad.


    The Arab Of the Desert by H R P Dickson



    Rulers Of Mecca by Gerald De Gaury



    The Great Siege by Ernle Bradford



    Pity the Nation by Robert Fisk



    What Went Wrong? Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response by Bernard Lewis



    Masada by Yigael Yadin



Middle Eastern History Books & Ephemera


    A History Of the Arab Peoples by Albert Hourani

    In a bestselling work of profound and lasting importance, the late Albert Hourani told the definitive history of the Arab peoples from the seventh century, when the new religion of Islam began to spread from the Arabian peninsula westwards, to the present day. It is a masterly distillation of a lifetime of scholarship and a unique insight into a perpetually troubled region. This updated edition by Malise Ruthven adds a substantial new chapter which includes recent events such as 9/11, the US invasion of Iraq and its bloody aftermath, the fall of the Mubarak and Ben Ali regimes in Egypt and Tunisia, and the incipient civil war in Syria, bringing Hourani's magisterial history up to date. Ruthven suggests that while Hourani can hardly have been expected to predict in detail the massive upheavals that have shaken the Arab world recently he would not have been entirely surprised, given the persistence of the kin-patronage networks he describes in his book and the challenges now posed to them by a new media-aware generation of dissatisfied youth. In a new biographical preface, Malise Ruthven shows how Hourani's perspectives on Arab history were shaped by his unique background as an English-born Arab Christian with roots in the Levant.


    From Beirut To Jerusalem by Friedman, Thomas L

    The New York Times Middle East correspondent profiles this troubled region, describing the everyday horrors of Beirut, the intricacies of Arab politics, Arab-Israeli relations, and American perceptions of the region.


    Peace To End All Peace by Fromkin, David

    Featuring a new afterword offering an updated assessment of the region, a twentieth anniversary edition of the acclaimed study of the Middle East traces the influence of the Allies on Middle East politics during and after World War I and the legacy of the era on the shifting political unities and divisions of today.


    Lords Of the Horizons by Goodwin, Jason

    The Ottoman Empire has exerted a long, strong pull on Western minds and hearts. For over six hundred years the Empire swelled and declined; rising from a dusty fiefdom in the foothills of Anatolia to a power which ruled over the Danube and the Euphrates with the richest court in Europe. But its decline was prodigious, protracted, and total. Lords of the Horizons charts the Ottoman Empire's swirling history; dramatic, detailed and alive - a journey, and a world all in one.


    What Went Wrong? - Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response by Lewis, Bernard

    For many centuries, the world of Islam was in the forefront of human achievement--the foremost military and economic power in the world, the leader in the arts and sciences of civilization. Christian Europe, a remote land beyond its northwestern frontier, was seen as an outer darkness of barbarism and unbelief from which there was nothing to learn or to fear. And then everything changed, as the previously despised West won victory after victory, first in the battlefield and the marketplace, then in almost every aspect of public and even private life. In this intriguing volume, Bernard Lewis examines the anguished reaction of the Islamic world as it tried to understand why things had changed--how they had been overtaken, overshadowed, and to an increasing extent dominated by the West. Lewis provides a fascinating portrait of a culture in turmoil. He shows how the Middle East turned its attention to understanding European weaponry and military tactics, commerce and industry, government and diplomacy, education and culture. Lewis highlights the striking differences between the Western and Middle Eastern cultures from the 18th to the 20th centuries through thought-provoking comparisons of such things as Christianity and Islam, music and the arts, the position of women, secularism and the civil society, the clock and the calendar.Hailed in The New York Times Book Review as "the doyen of Middle Eastern studies," Bernard Lewis is one of the West's foremost authorities on Islamic history and culture. In this striking volume, he offers an incisive look at the historical relationship between the Middle East and Europe.


    The Great War For Civilisation by Fisk, Robert

    Best-selling author and journalist Robert Fisk, based in Beirut as Middle East Correspondent of The Independent , has lived in the Middle East for almost three decades and holds more British and international journalism awards than any other foreign correspondent. His last book, Pity the Nation , a history of the Lebanon war, was published to great critical acclaim.


    Six Days Of War by Oren, Michael B

    Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East is a 2002 non-fiction book by American-Israeli historian Michael Oren, chronicling the events of the Six-Day War fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors. Widely praised by critics, the book won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for history and spent seven weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list.


    A History Of Islamic Societies by Lapidus, Ira M

    An accessible worldwide history of Muslim societies provides updated coverage of each country and region, in a volume that discusses their origins and evolution while offering insight into historical processes that shaped contemporary Islam and surveying its growing influence.


    Power, Faith and Fantasy by Oren, Michael B

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [693]-741 and index.


    Bible and Sword by Tuchman, Barbara W

    Barbara W. Tuchman (1912–1989) achieved prominence as a historian with The Zimmermann Telegram and international fame with The Guns of August —a huge bestseller and winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Her other works include Bible and Sword, The Proud Tower, Stilwell and the American Experience in China (for which Tuchman was awarded a second Pulitzer Prize), Notes from China, A Distant Mirror, Practicing History, The March of Folly, and The First Salute .


    Arab and Jew by Shipler, David K

    Rhidian Brook was born in Tenby, South Wales. The Testimony of Taliesin Jones received the Somerset Maugham and Betty Task Awards and was short-listed for the Welsh Novel of the Year. He is also the author of the novel Jesus and The Adman .


    Ottoman Centuries by Kinross, Lord



    The Blood Of Abraham by Carter, Jimmy



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