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World Literature

From The Little Prince to Doctor Zhivago, from The Little Prince to Quo Vadis, we can help you find the world literature books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.co.uk, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.


Top Sellers in World Literature

    The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupery

    The Little Prince, published in 1943, is French aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's most famous novella. Saint-Exupéry wrote it while living in the United States. It has been translated into more than 180 languages and sold more than 80 million copies making it one of the best selling books ever. An earlier memoir by the author recounts his aviation experiences in the Saharan desert. He is thought to have drawn on these same experiences for use as plot elements in The Little Prince.


    Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

    Anna Karenina (sometimes Anglicised as Anna Karenin) is a novel by the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, published in serial installments from 1873 to 1877 in the periodical The Russian Messenger. Tolstoy clashed with its editor Mikhail Katkov over issues that arose in the final installment; therefore, the novel's first complete appearance was in book form.


    Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

    Madame Bovary is Gustave Flaubert's first novel and considered his masterpiece. The story focuses on a doctor's wife, Emma Bovary, who has adulterous affairs and lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life. Though the basic plot is rather simple, even archetypal, the novel's true art lies in its details and hidden patterns.


    Les Miserables by Victor Hugo

    Considered one of the greatest novels of the 19th century, Les Miserables (translated variously from French as The Miserable Ones, The Poor Ones, The Wretched Poor, The Victims) is a French historical novel by Victor Hugo. The story follows the struggles of ex-convict Jean Valjean from 1815 through the 1832 Rebellion in Paris. Les Miserables' beloved story of redemption encourages compassion and hope in the face of adversity and injustice.    The epic novel is divided in five volumes, each of which is divided into several books and subdivided into chapters, totaling 48 books and 365 chapters. Les Miserables, as a whole, is one the longest novels ever written with about 1,500 pages in unabridged English editions and 1,900 pages in French. Les Misérables is known to many through its numerous stage and screen adaptations, such as the stage musical of the same name, sometimes abbreviated "Les Mis".


    The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri

    Dante Alighieri was born in 1265. Considered Italy's greatest poet, this scion of a Florentine family mastered in the art of lyric poetry at an early age. His first major work is La Vita Nuova (1292) which is a tribute to Beatrice Portinari, the great love of his life. Married to Gemma Donatic, Dante's political activism resulted in his being exiled from Florence to eventually settle in Ravenna. It is believed that The Divine Comedy —comprised of three canticles, The Inferno, The Purgatorio , and The Paradiso —was written between 1308 and 1320. Dante Alighieri died in 1321.


    Heidi by Johanna Spyri

    Heidi is a classic children's book first published in 1881 in Germany by Swiss author Johanna Spyri in two parts: Heidi: Her Years of Wandering and Learning , and Heidi: How She Used What She Learned. Subtitled: "Geschichten für Kinder wie auch für Solche, Welche Kinder lieb haben von Johanna Spyri” Stories for children as well as those that love children by Johanna Spyri). It is one of the best-selling books ever written, and one of the best-known pieces of Swiss literature. Heidi tells the story of the namesake orphan brought to live with her grandfather in the Swiss Alps. Her cheery attitude wins the heart of her grumpy grandfather, the friendship of a goatherd Peter and his family, and the friendship of Clara, an city-dwelling invalid who later regains her mobility after visiting Heidi in the mountains. Two sequels, Heidi Grows Up and Heidi's Children, were not written by Spyri, but by her English translator, Charles Tritten. 


    One Hundred Years Of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    One Hundred Years of Solitude is a novel by Nobel Prize-winning Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez. It was first published in Spanish in 1967. The book was an instant success worldwide and was translated into over 27 languages. Lauded critically, the book contributed to the Latin American "boom" in literature and the development of the postmodernism literary style. It was also an immense commercial success, becoming the best-selling book in Spanish in modern history, after Don Quixote.


    The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov

    The Master and Margarita is a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, woven around the premise of a visit by the Devil to the fervently atheistic Soviet Union. Many critics consider the book to be one of the greatest novels of the 20th century, as well as one of the foremost Soviet satires, directed against a social order seen as suffocatingly bureaucratic.


    The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann

    Thomas Mann was born in 1875 in Germany. He was only twenty-five when his first novel, Buddenbrooks , was published. In 1924 The Magic Mountain was published, and, five years later, Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Following the rise of the Nazis to power, he left Germany for good in 1933 to live in Switzerland and then in California, where he wrote Doctor Faustus (first published in the United States in 1948). Thomas Mann died in 1955.


    The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne

    The Mysterious Island is a novel by Jules Verne, published in 1874. The original edition, published by Hetzel, contains a number of illustrations by Jules Férat. The novel is a sequel to Verne's famous Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and In Search of the Castaways, though thematically it is vastly different from those books.


    Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev

    Turgenev?s timeless tale of generational collision, in a sparkling new translation When Arkady Petrovich returns home from college, his father finds his eager, naïve son changed almost beyond recognition, for the impressionable Arkady has fallen under the powerful influence of the friend he has brought home with him. A self-proclaimed nihilist, the ardent young Bazarov shocks Arkady?s father with his criticisms of the landowning way of life and his determination to overthrow the traditional values of contemporary society. Vividly capturing the hopes and fears, regrets and delusions of a changing Russia around the middle of the nineteenth century, Fathers and Sons is Ivan Turgenev?s masterpiece.


    The Plague by Albert Camus

    Albert Camus' parable, The Plague , tells the tale of a town beset by a horrible disease carried in from rats in the sewer, and the lessons the main characters learn as they face humanity in the destruction of the plague.


    The Trial by Franz Kafka

    It is the fate and perhaps the greatness of that work that it offers everything and confirms nothing' Albert CamusThe terrifying tale of Joseph K, a respectable functionary in a bank, who is suddenly arrested and must defend his innocence against a charge about which he can get no information. A nightmare vision of the excesses of modern bureaucracy wedded to the mad agendas of twentieth-century totalitarian regimes.


    Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

    This book is a fable, told in simple language, of an Andalusian shepherd boy who forsakes his comfortable, predictable life and follows his dream. "I don’t live in either my past or my future. I’m interested only in the present. If you can concentrate always on the present, you’ll be a happy man. Life will be a party for you, a grand festival, because life is the moment we’re living now."


    Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand

    The legendary romance about a quick-witted swashbuckler whose nose is as big as his heart Set during the reign of Louis XIII, Cyrano de Bergerac is a play about one of the most estimable characters in literature. Desperately in love with the beautiful Roxane but convinced she will never look past his titanic proboscis, Cyrano helps the tongue-tied Christian pen exquisite verse with which to woo her. Presented in an elegant new translation, this comic adventure continues to be popular for its dramatic power and, above all, its magnetic hero. * Includes an introduction, chronology, explanatory notes, and historical note  


    The Unbearable Lightness Of Being by Milan Kundera

    The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1984), by Milan Kundera, is a philosophic novel about a man and his two women and their lives in the Prague Spring of the Czechoslovak Communist period in 1968. Although written in 1982, the novel was not published until two years later, in France; the Czech: Nesnesitelná lehkost bytí and French: l'Insoutenable légèreté de l'être titles are the more common worldwide.


    Swann's Way by Marcel Proust

    Since the original prewar translation there has been no completely new rendering of the French original into English. This translation brings to the fore a more sharply engaged, comic and lucid Proust. IN SEARCH OF LOST TIME is one of the greatest,most entertaining reading experiences in any language. As the great story unfolds from its magical opening scenes to its devastating end, it is the Penguin Proust that makes Proust accessible to a new generation. Each volume is translated by a different, superb translator working under the general editorship of Professor Christopher Prendergast, University of Cambridge.


    The Prince by Niccolo MacHiavelli

    The Prince is a political treatise by the Italian public servant and political theorist Niccolò Machiavelli. Originally called De Principatibus (About Principalities), it was originally written in 1513, but not published until 1532, five years after Machiavelli's death. The Prince was one of the first works of modern philosophy, in which pragmatic ends, as opposed to teleological concepts, are the purpose.


    Zorba the Greek by Nikos Kazantzakis

    Zorba the Greek is a novel written by the Greek author Nikos Kazantzakis, first published in 1946. It is the tale of a young Greek intellectual who ventures to escape his bookish life with the aid of the boisterous and mysterious Alexis Zorbas. The novel was adapted into a successful 1964 film of the same name as well as a 1968 musical, Zorba.


    Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

    Hesse's famous and influential novel, Siddartha , is perhaps the most important and compelling moral allegory our troubled century has produced. Integrating Eastern and Western spiritual traditions with psychoanalysis and philosophy, this strangely simple tale, written with a deep and moving empathy for humanity, has touched the lives of millions since its original publication in 1922. Set in India, Siddhartha is the story of a young Brahmin's search for ultimate reality after meeting with the Buddha. His quest takes him from a life of decadence to asceticism, through the illusory joys of sensual love with a beautiful courtesan, and of wealth and fame, to the painful struggles with his son and the ultimate wisdom of renunciation. This new translation by award-winning translator Joachim Neugroschel includes an introduction by Hesse biographer Ralph Freedman.


    Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse



    The Flowers Of Evil by Charles Baudelaire



    Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak

    Doctor Zhivago is a 20th century novel by Boris Pasternak, first published in 1957. The novel is named after its protagonist, Yuri Zhivago, a medical doctor and poet. It tells the story of a man torn between two women, set primarily against the backdrop of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the subsequent Russian Civil War of 1918–1920. More deeply, the novel discusses the plight of a man as the life that he has always known is dramatically torn apart by forces beyond his control.


World Literature Books & Ephemera


    The Little Prince by Saint-Exupery, Antoine De

    The Little Prince, published in 1943, is French aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's most famous novella. Saint-Exupéry wrote it while living in the United States. It has been translated into more than 180 languages and sold more than 80 million copies making it one of the best selling books ever. An earlier memoir by the author recounts his aviation experiences in the Saharan desert. He is thought to have drawn on these same experiences for use as plot elements in The Little Prince.


    The Trial by Kafka, Franz

    It is the fate and perhaps the greatness of that work that it offers everything and confirms nothing' Albert CamusThe terrifying tale of Joseph K, a respectable functionary in a bank, who is suddenly arrested and must defend his innocence against a charge about which he can get no information. A nightmare vision of the excesses of modern bureaucracy wedded to the mad agendas of twentieth-century totalitarian regimes.


    The Plague by Camus, Albert

    Albert Camus' parable, The Plague , tells the tale of a town beset by a horrible disease carried in from rats in the sewer, and the lessons the main characters learn as they face humanity in the destruction of the plague.


    One Hundred Years Of Solitude by Marquez, Gabriel Garcia

    One Hundred Years of Solitude is a novel by Nobel Prize-winning Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez. It was first published in Spanish in 1967. The book was an instant success worldwide and was translated into over 27 languages. Lauded critically, the book contributed to the Latin American "boom" in literature and the development of the postmodernism literary style. It was also an immense commercial success, becoming the best-selling book in Spanish in modern history, after Don Quixote.


    The Unbearable Lightness Of Being by Kundera, Milan

    The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1984), by Milan Kundera, is a philosophic novel about a man and his two women and their lives in the Prague Spring of the Czechoslovak Communist period in 1968. Although written in 1982, the novel was not published until two years later, in France; the Czech: Nesnesitelná lehkost bytí and French: l'Insoutenable légèreté de l'être titles are the more common worldwide.


    Mr Palomar by Calvino, Italo

    Mr. Palomar, whose name purposely evokes that of the famous telescope, is a seeker after knowledge, a visionary in a world sublime and ridiculous. Whether contemplating a cheese, a woman’s breasts, or a gorilla’s behavior, he brings us a vision of a world familiar by consensus, fragmented by the burden of individual perception. Translated by William Weaver. A Helen and Kurt Wolff Book


    Wind, Sand and Stars by Saint-Exupery, Antoine De

    Recipient of the Grand Prix of the Académie Française, Wind, Sand and Stars captures the grandeur, danger, and isolation of flight. Its exciting account of air adventure, combined with lyrical prose and the spirit of a philosopher, makes it one of the most popular works ever written about flying. Translated by Lewis Galantière.


    Euripides by Euripides

    Includes bibliographical references and index. Text in Greek; introduction, notes, and commentary in English.


    The Castle by Kafka, Franz

    The Castle (original title: "Das Schloß") is the story of K., the unwanted Land Surveyor who is never to be admitted to the Castle nor accepted in the village, and yet cannot go home. As he encounters dualities of certainty and doubt, hope and fear, and reason and nonsense, K.'s struggles in the absurd, labyrinthine world where he finds himself seem to reveal an inexplicable truth about the nature of existence. Kafka began The Castle in 1922 and it was never finished, yet this, the last of his three great novels, draws fascinating conclusions that make it feel strangely complete.


    The Divine Comedy by Alighieri, Dante

    Dante Alighieri was born in 1265. Considered Italy's greatest poet, this scion of a Florentine family mastered in the art of lyric poetry at an early age. His first major work is La Vita Nuova (1292) which is a tribute to Beatrice Portinari, the great love of his life. Married to Gemma Donatic, Dante's political activism resulted in his being exiled from Florence to eventually settle in Ravenna. It is believed that The Divine Comedy —comprised of three canticles, The Inferno, The Purgatorio , and The Paradiso —was written between 1308 and 1320. Dante Alighieri died in 1321.


    The Magic Mountain by Mann, Thomas

    Thomas Mann was born in 1875 in Germany. He was only twenty-five when his first novel, Buddenbrooks , was published. In 1924 The Magic Mountain was published, and, five years later, Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Following the rise of the Nazis to power, he left Germany for good in 1933 to live in Switzerland and then in California, where he wrote Doctor Faustus (first published in the United States in 1948). Thomas Mann died in 1955.


    The Neverending Story by Ende, Michael

    The Neverending Story is a German fantasy novel by Michael Ende, first published in 1979 under the title Die unendliche Geschichte. The standard English translation, by Ralph Manheim, was first published in 1983. The novel was later adapted into several films. The majority of the story takes place in the parallel world of Fantastica (Phantásien in the original German version; referred to as Fantasia in the films), a world being destroyed by the Nothing, which represents and constitutes people's lack of imagination in the real world. The first protagonist is a young warrior, who is asked by the sick Empress to set off and find the cure for their world. The other protagonist is a boy from the real world, a reader of the novel with the same title, for whom the story gradually becomes more and more realistic. -


    The Master and Margarita by Bulgakov, Mikhail

    The Master and Margarita is a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, woven around the premise of a visit by the Devil to the fervently atheistic Soviet Union. Many critics consider the book to be one of the greatest novels of the 20th century, as well as one of the foremost Soviet satires, directed against a social order seen as suffocatingly bureaucratic.


    My Name Is Red by Pamuk, Orhan

    My Name Is Red (Benim Adım Kırmızı) is a Turkish novel by Nobel laureate author Orhan Pamuk. It won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in 2003, as well as the French Prix du meilleur livre étranger and Italian Premio Grinzane Cavour awards in 2002. The novel and its English translation established Pamuk's international reputation and contributed to his winning of the Nobel prize.


    Hopscotch by Cortazar, Julio

    JULIO CORTAZAR was born in 1914 in Belgium to Argentinean parents, grew up in Buenos Aires, and moved to Paris in 1951. An acclaimed and influential novelist, short-story writer, poet, playwright, and essayist, he was also a human rights advocate and amateur jazz musician. He died in Paris in 1984.


    Madame Bovary by Flaubert, Gustave

    Madame Bovary is Gustave Flaubert's first novel and considered his masterpiece. The story focuses on a doctor's wife, Emma Bovary, who has adulterous affairs and lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life. Though the basic plot is rather simple, even archetypal, the novel's true art lies in its details and hidden patterns.


    Austerlitz by Sebald, W G

    W. G. Sebald taught at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, for thirty years, becoming Professor of European Literature in 1987, and from 1989 to 1994 was the first Director of the British Centre for Literary Translation. His three previous books won several international awards, including the L.A. Times Book Award for fiction, the Berlin Literature Prize and the Literatur Nord Prize. W. G. Sebald was killed in a car accident at age 57 in December 2001.


    Demian by Hesse, Hermann

    Demian: The Story of Emil Sinclair's Youth is a bildungsroman by Hermann Hesse, first published in 1919; a prologue was added in 1960. Demian was first published under the pseudonym "Emil Sinclair", the name of the narrator of the story, but Hesse was later revealed to be the author. The novel was written in just three weeks.


    The Time Of the Hero by Vargas Llosa, Mario



    The Works Of Aristotle - Volume II by Aristotle



    Quo Vadis by Sienkiewicz, Henryk



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