Southern Fiction

From To Kill a Mockingbird to The Boo, from Shiloh to A Faulkner Miscellany, we can help you find the southern fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.co.uk, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Top Sellers in Southern Fiction

To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird

by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was instantly successful and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on the author's observations of her family and neighbors, as well as on an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936, when she was 10 years old. The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with serious issues of rape and racial inequality.
Midnight In the Garden Of Good and Evil

Midnight In the Garden Of Good and Evil

by John Berendt

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil is a work by John Berendt. The book was Berendt's first, and became a The New York Times bestseller for 216 weeks following its debut. The book was subsequently made into a 1997 movie directed by Clint Eastwood based loosely on Berendt's story.
The Prince Of Tides

The Prince Of Tides

by Pat Conroy

In his most brilliant and powerful novel, Pat Conroy tells the story of Tom Wingo, his twin sister, Savannah, and the dark and violent past of the family into which they were born. Set in New York City and the lowcountry of South Carolina, the novel opens when Tom, a high school football coach whose marriage and career are crumbling, flies from South Carolina to New York after learning of his twin sister's suicide attempt. Savannah is one of the most gifted poets of her generation, and both the cadenced... Read more
The Yearling

The Yearling

by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

The Yearling is a 1938 novel written by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. It won the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1939. Rawlings's editor was Maxwell Perkins, who also worked with F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, and other literary luminaries. She had submitted several projects to Perkins for his review, and he rejected them all. He instructed her to write about what she knew from her own life, and the result of her taking his advice was The Yearling.
Deliverance

Deliverance

by James Dickey

The setting is the Georgia wilderness, where the states most remote white-water river awaits. In the thundering froth of that river, in its echoing stone canyons, four men on a canoe trip discover a freedom and exhilaration beyond compare. And then, in a moment of horror, the adventure turns into a struggle for survival as one man becomes a human hunter who is offered his own harrowing deliverance.From the Trade Paperback edition.
A Christmas Memory

A Christmas Memory

by Truman Capote

"A Christmas Memory" is a short story by Truman Capote. Originally published in Mademoiselle magazine in December 1956, it was reprinted in The Selected Writings of Truman Capote in 1963. It was issued in a stand-alone hardcover edition by Random House in 1966, and it has been published in many editions and anthologies since. The largely autobiographical story, which takes place in the 1930s, describes the lives of seven-year-old Buddy and his elderly cousin Sook, who is Buddy's best friend.
Cross Creek

Cross Creek

by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings


Originally published in 1942, Cross Creek has become a classic in modern American literature. For the millions of readers raised on The Yearling, here is the story of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings's experiences in the remote Florida hamlet of Cross Creek, where she lived for thirteen years. From the daily labors of managing a seventy-two-acre orange grove to bouts with runaway pigs and a succession of unruly farmhands, Rawlings describes her life at the Creek with humor and spirit. Her tireless determination... Read more
God's Little Acre

God's Little Acre

by Erskine Caldwell

God's Little Acre by author Erskine
Caldwell tells the story of a rural, proletariat family in South
Carolina whose lives seemingly revolve around the pursuit of sex and
money. A commentary on the plight of the working class sans union
protection in the 1930s, the novel also explores themes on land and
resource conservation. Due to the sexual imagery, Caldwell was sued
for the dissemination of pornography, but ultimately prevailed in
court. The case and decision is considered significant in the... Read more
Uncle Remus

Uncle Remus

by Joel Chandler Harris

The dialect, lore, and flavor of black life in the nineteenth-century South is portrayed as it appeared to Georgia-born Joel Chandler Harris in Uncle Remus’s "Legends of the Old Plantation."
The Great Santini

The Great Santini

by Pat Conroy

The Great Santini is a novel written by Pat Conroy and published in 1976.Marine Col. Bull Meecham commands his home like a soldiers’ barracks. Cold and controlling, but also loving, Bull has complicated relationships with each member of his family—in particular, his eldest son, Ben. A born athlete who desperately seeks his father’s approval, Ben is determined to break out from the colonel’s shadow. With guidance from teachers at his new school, he strives to find the courage to stand up to... Read more
A Confederacy Of Dunces

A Confederacy Of Dunces

by John Kennedy Toole

A Confederacy of Dunces is a picaresque novel written by John Kennedy Toole, published in 1980, 11 years after the author's suicide. The book was published through the efforts of writer Walker Percy (who also contributed a revealing foreword) and Toole's mother Thelma Toole, quickly becoming a cult classic, and later a mainstream success. Toole posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1981. It is an important part of the 'modern canon' of Southern literature.
Cold Mountain

Cold Mountain

by Charles Frazier

Charles Frazier, born in 1950, is an award-winning American historical novelist. His debut novel, Cold Mountain won the National Book Award in 1997. Utilizing the historical content of the Civil War, his novel explores social class transformation and change wrought from national upheaval. The story details the very different lives of three people. Inman, a wounded confederate soldier repelled by the violence and madness of the civil war, deserts from the military hospital and decides to walk back home to... Read more
Of Time and The River

Of Time and The River

by Thomas Wolfe


The sequel to Thomas Wolfe's remarkable first novel, Look Homeward, Angel, Of Time and the River is one of the great classics of American literature. The book chronicles the maturing of Wolfe's autobiographical character, Eugene Gant, in his desperate search for fulfillment, making his way from small-town North Carolina to the wider world of Harvard University, New York City, and Europe. In a massive, ambitious, and boldly passionate novel, Wolfe examines the passing of time and the nature of the... Read more
Lamb In His Bosom

Lamb In His Bosom

by Caroline Miller

Lamb in His Bosom is a 1933 novel by Caroline Miller. It won the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1934. It also won the Prix Femina in 1934 and became an immediate best-seller. Many names and historical parts of this book were contributed by William Avery McIntosh, of Mt. Pleasant, Wayne County, Georgia. His only child, a daughter, is still living in Northeast Georgia.
The Lords Of Discipline

The Lords Of Discipline

by Pat Conroy

Pat Conroy is the bestselling author of The Water is Wide, The Great Santini, The Lords of Discipline, The Prince of Tides, Beach Music, and My Losing Season. He lives in Fripp Island, South Carolina.From the Trade Paperback edition.
You Can't Go Home Again

You Can't Go Home Again

by Thomas Wolfe

Thomas Wolfe's You Can't Go Home Again tells the poignant story of a successful novelist, ostracized by family and friends, who subsequently embarks on a world-wide search for his own identity and personal renewal.
Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O'Connor

by Flannery O'Connor

Eneas Africanus

Eneas Africanus

by Harry Stillwell Edwards

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The Confessions Of Nat Turner

by William Styron

The Confessions of Nat Turner is the title of two books: The Confessions of Nat Turner, the Leader of the Late Insurrections in Southampton, Va. , an 1831 book written after Nat Turner's trial by his lawyer, Thomas Ruffin Gray The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967), a 1967 novel by William Styron
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Gone With the Wind

by Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell only published one complete novel, but it was quite the book - Gone With the Wind earned her the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and National Book Award for 1936. The epic romance tale set in and around Atlanta, Georgia during the American Civil War has remained a bestseller, even before the equally popular film starring Clark Gable and Vivian Leigh was made in 1939.
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All the King's Men

by Robert Penn Warren

All the King's Men is a novel by Robert Penn Warren, first published in 1946. The novel's title is drawn from the nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty. In 1947 Warren won the Pulitzer Prize for All the King's Men. It was adapted for film in 1949 and 2006; the 1949 version won the Academy Award for Best Picture.
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A Death In the Family

by James Agee

A Death in the Family is an autobiographical novel by author James Agee, set in Knoxville, Tennessee. He began writing it in 1948, but it was not quite complete when he died in 1955. It was edited and released posthumously in 1957 by editor David McDowell. Agee's widow and children were left with little money after Agee's death and McDowell wanted to help them by publishing the work. Agee won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1958 for the novel.
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Sanctuary

by William Faulkner

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The Boo

by Pat Conroy

Southern Fiction Books & Ephemera

Shiloh

Shiloh

by Foote, Shelby

Shelby Foote was born on November 7, 1916 in Greenville, Mississippi, and attended school there until he entered the University of North Carolina. During World War II he served as a captain of field artillery but never saw combat. After World War II he worked briefly for the Associated Press in their New York bureau. In 1953 he moved to Memphis, where he lived for the remainder of his life.Foote was the author of six novels: Tournament, Follow Me Down, Love in a Dry Season, Shiloh, Jordan County, and... Read more
Love In a Dry Season

Love In a Dry Season

by Foote, Shelby

Shelby Foote was born on November 7, 1916 in Greenville, Mississippi, and attended school there until he entered the University of North Carolina. During World War II he served as a captain of field artillery but never saw combat. After World War II he worked briefly for the Associated Press in their New York bureau. In 1953 he moved to Memphis, where he lived for the remainder of his life.Foote was the author of six novels: Tournament, Follow Me Down, Love in a Dry Season, Shiloh, Jordan County, and... Read more
A World Made Of Fire

A World Made Of Fire

by Childress, Mark

Tender

Tender

by Childress, Mark

Fay

Fay

by Brown, Larry

Feather Crowns

Feather Crowns

by Mason, Bobbie Ann

A Plantation Christmas

A Plantation Christmas

by Peterkin, Julia

Violence

Violence

by Bausch, Richard

Any Cold Jordan

Any Cold Jordan

by Bottoms, David

A Faulkner Miscellany

A Faulkner Miscellany

by Meriwether, James B