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African American Fiction book


Most valuable African American Fiction books

Curious what the most valuable and expensive african american fiction books are? Below is a small sample of some of the most expensive books that have sold on Biblio.co.uk:


Recent Arrivals in African American Fiction

African American Fiction

From Uncle Tom's Cabin to The Bluest Eye, from Waiting To Exhale to Just Plain Folks, we can help you find the african american fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.co.uk, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.


Top Sellers in African American Fiction

    Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

    In Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriett Beecher Stowe, the title character Uncle Tom is a long-suffering slave, loyal to both his faith and his master. Presented with an opportunity to escape, he instead chooses to remain in slavery to avoid embarrassing his master. After being sold to a slave trader, Tom suffers brutal treatment and is eventually beaten to death for his refusal to betray his friends — made to represent an ideal of true Christianity. Enormously popular (it was the best-selling novel of the 19th century) and influential, it’s publication in 1852 was instrumental in bringing visibility to the cruel reality of slavery. In more recent years, it has come under considerable criticism for its portrayal of meekness and subservience and the phrase “Uncle Tom” is sometimes used as an epithet for someone seen as overly subservient. 


    Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

    Their Eyes Were Watching God is a 1937 novel and the best-known work by African American writer Zora Neale Hurston. Set in central and southern Florida in the early 20th century, the novel garnered attention and controversy at the time of its publication, and has come to be regarded as a seminal work in both African American literature and women's literature. Time included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.


    Song Of Solomon by Toni Morrison

    Song of Solomon is Nobel-prize winner Toni Morrison's third novel, published in 1977 by Alfred A. Knopf . It tells the story of Macon "Milkman" Dead III, a young African-American living in an unnamed mid-western city in the mid-nineteenth century as he seeks to discover his own identity and relationship to the world he lives in and uncovers his family's history. Winner of the National Book Critics Award , it has faced numerous school bans and challenges since publication. Former U.S. President Barack Obama reportedly listed it as his favorite book.


    Beloved by Toni Morrison

    Beloved (1987) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Toni Morrison. The novel is based on the life and legal case of the slave Margaret Garner. The slavery of the American south is bared in this transfixing tale.  Sethe was born a slave, and escaped to Ohio, but the past follows where the authorities do not.  She is haunted by the memories of the beautiful place where she experienced so many terrible things, and haunted by the ghost of her baby daughter - her Beloved.


    The Color Purple by Alice Walker

    The Color Purple is an acclaimed epistolary novel by American author Alice Walker. Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, this collection of letters weaves an intricate mosaic of women joined by their love for each other, the men who abuse them, and the children they care for. In this, The Color Purple focuses on black female life in the American South during the 1930s, addressing the numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture. The novel received the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award. Because of the explicit content, particularly in terms of violence, The Color Purple has been a frequent target of censors, appearing on the American Library Association list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-1999.


    Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

    Even though Ralph Ellison's novel Invisible Man is sometimes featured on banned books lists, it remains a consistent staple on many high school reading curriculums. In the novel, Ellison laments the feeling of hopelessness and invisibility that many Black men experience in the United States, and it elegantly explores the themes of racism and bigotry in ways that are both unsettling and accessible.


    I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

    Titled after a stanza from Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poem “Sympathy,” I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is the first of a series of seven autobiographical novels by African-American poet and writer Maya Angelou. Personally deeply involved and affected by the civil rights movement, the volume explores racism and identity in her early life.   I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings was nominated for the National Book Award in 1970. However, due to its depiction of controversial subjects such as sexuality, lesbianism and rape, the use of the novel in classrooms has been frequently challenged. -


    Native Son by Richard Wright

    Richard Wright’s Native Son tells the story of 20-year-old Bigger Thomas, a black American youth living in utter poverty in Chicago's South Side during the 1930s. When Bigger unintentionally murders a white woman, he is put on trial and eventually convicted, and sentenced to the electric chair. Often recognized as a protest novel, Native Son stresses systemic racial issues, prompting the reader to feel both sympathy and empathy for Bigger. In this, the novel is one of the earliest successful attempts to explain the racial divide in America in terms of the conditions imposed on African-Americans by the dominant white society. Soon after publication, Native Son was selected by the Book of the Month Club as its first book by an African-American author. Indeed, the novel was an immediate best seller, selling 250,000 hardcover copies within three weeks of its publication. As a result of the novel’s success, Wright became the first bestselling and the wealthiest black writer of his time, establishing him as a spokesperson for African-American issues and, to many, the “father of Black American literature.” In 1941, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People awarded Wright awarded the prestigious Spingarn Medal. Unsurprisingly, Native Son was challenged in many public schools and libraries and is listed in the American Library Association's list of the “Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–1999.” Yet most institutions in which the novel was challenged successfully fought to keep Wright's work accessible, particularly in the classroom, defending it as a guide into the reality of the complex adult and social world.   Native son is listed as 20th on the Modern Library’s list of the “100 Best” English-language novels of the 20th century. It is also included in TIME’s “100 Best Novels” (since 1923).


    Paradise by Toni Morrison

    "Rumors had been whispered for more than a year. Outrages that had been accumulating all along took shape as evidence. A mother was knocked down the stairs by her cold-eyed daughter. Four damaged infants were born in one family. Daughters refused to get out of bed. Brides disappeared on their honeymoons. Two brothers shot each other on New Year's Day. Trips to Demby for VD shots common. And what went on at the Oven these days was not to be believed . . . The proof they had been collecting since the terrible discovery in the spring could not be denied: the one thing that connected all these catastrophes was in the Convent. And in the Convent were those women."In Paradise--her first novel since she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature--Toni Morrison gives us a bravura performance. As the book begins deep in Oklahoma early one morning in 1976, nine men from Ruby (pop. 360), in defense of "the one all-black town worth the pain," assault the nearby Convent and the women in it. From the town's ancestral origins in 1890 to the fateful day of the assault, Paradise tells the story of a people ever mindful of the relationship between their spectacular history and a void "Out There . . . where random and organized evil erupted when and where it chose." Richly imagined and elegantly composed, Paradise weaves a powerful mystery.From the Hardcover edition.


    The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead

    Colson Whitehead was born in New York City in 1969. His journalism has appeared in Vibe, Spin, Newsday, and The Village Voice, where he was a television columnist. A graduate of Harvard College, he currently lives in Brooklyn, New York.


    Go Tell It On the Mountain by James Baldwin

    Written over a span of ten years, Go Tell it on the Mountain is James Baldwin’s first completed novel. The story follows John Grimes, a bright teen living in Harlem in the 1930s, as he explores relationships with his family and his church. On a basic level, Go Tell it on the Mountain is a coming of age story, yet the novel gains complexity as the omniscient narrator interweaves John’s story with the stories of his mother, father, and aunt. In addition to the Grimes family, a main focus of the text is the function of the Christian Church in the lives of African-Americans, which Baldwin argues to be a source of moral hypocrisy and repression. And with a title like Go Tell it on the Mountain , it is no surprise that the novel contains has many biblical references throughout. The novel is generally accepted as semi-autobiographical. Like the protagonist, Baldwin grew up in Harlem. Neither had a relationship with their biological fathers and both resented their religious fanatic stepfathers. Also like John, Baldwin underwent a religious awakening as a young adult. Go Tell it on the Mountain is ranked 39th on Modern Library’s “100 Best” English-language novels of the 20th century and is also listed on TIME’s “100 Best Novels” (since 1923). In 1984, ABC produced a made-for-television movie based on the novel. -


    Jazz by Toni Morrison

    In the winter of 1926, when everybody everywhere sees nothing but good things ahead, Joe Trace, middle-aged door-to-door salesman of Cleopatra beauty products, shoots his teenage lover to death. At the funeral, Joe's wife, Violet, attacks the girl's corpse. This passionate, profound story of love and obsession brings us back and forth in time, as a narrative is assembled from the emotions, hopes, fears, and deep realities of black urban life.From the Trade Paperback edition.


    Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin

    James Baldwin was the author of Go Tell It on the Mountain and The Fire Next Time , among other books.


    The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

    The Fire Next Time is a book by James Baldwin. It contains two essays: "My Dungeon Shook - Letter to my Nephew on the One Hundredth Anniversary of Emancipation", and "Down At The Cross - Letter from a Region of My Mind". The first of these is written as a letter to Baldwin's 14 year old nephew, discussing the central role of race in American history.


    Wouldn't Take Nothing For My Journey Now by Maya Angelou

    Poet, writer, performer, teacher and director Maya Angelou was raised in Stamps, Arkansas, and then went to San Francisco. In addition to her bestselling autobiographies, beginning with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings , she has also written five poetry collections, including I Shall Not Be Moved and Shaker, Why Don't You Sing? , as well as the celebrated poem "On the Pulse of Morning," which she read at the inauguration of President William Jefferson Clinton.


    Parting the Waters by Taylor Branch



    Roots by Alex Haley

    Tracing his ancestry through six generations - slaves and freedmen, farmers and blacksmiths, lawyers and architects - back to Africa, Alex Haley discovered a sixteen-year-old youth, Kunta Kinte. It was this young man, who had been torn from his homeland and in torment and anguish brought to the slave markets of the New World, who held the key to Haley's deep and distant past. Originally published: Garden City, N.Y. : Doubleday, 1976.


    All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes by Maya Angelou

    "Thoroughly enjoyable . . . an important document drawing more much-needed attention to the hidden history of a people both African and American."--Los Angeles Times Book Review.From the Trade Paperback edition.


    The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

    The Bluest Eye is a 1970 novel by American author Toni Morrison. It is Morrison's first novel, written while Morrison was teaching at Howard University and was raising her two sons on her own. The story is about a year in the life of a young black girl in Lorain, Ohio named Pecola Breedlove. It takes place against the backdrop of America's Midwest as well as in the years following the Great Depression.  Brutal in its depictions of racism, incest, and child molestation, The Bluest Eye has remained on the often-challenged and banned books list almost every year since its publication.


African American Fiction Books & Ephemera


    Waiting To Exhale by McMillan, Terry

    The classic novel of triumph, revenge, and friendship-now in a premium edition From the critically-acclaimed author of How Stella Got Her Groove Back comes this wise, down-to-earth story of a friendship between four African American women who lean on each other while "waiting to exhale"-waiting for that man who will take their breath away.


    Just Above My Head by Baldwin, James

    Just Above My Head is James Baldwin's sixth novel, first published in 1979.


    Getting Mother's Body by Parks, Suzan-Lori

    Suzan-Lori Parks is a novelist, playwright, songwriter, and screenwriter. She was the recipient of the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play Topdog/ Underdog, as well as a 2001 MacArthur “genius grant.” Her other plays include Fucking A, In the Blood, The America Play, Venus, and The Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire World. Her first feature film, Girl 6, was directed by Spike Lee. A graduate of Mount Holyoke College, where she studied with James Baldwin, she has taught creative writing in universities across the country, including at the Yale School of Drama, and she heads the Dramatic Writing Program at CalArts. She is currently writing an adaptation of Toni Morrison’s novel Paradise for Oprah Winfrey, and the musical Hoopz for Disney. She lives in Venice Beach, California, with her husband, blues musician Paul Scher, and their pit bull, Lambchop. From the Hardcover edition.


    Possessing the Secret Of Joy by Walker, Alice

    In Alice Walker's Possessing the Secret of Joy , we meet Tashi Johnson again (she first appeared in The Color Purple ). The young tribal African woman is now living in North America. As a young woman, she submitted to the customs of her people led her to submit to the tribal initiation rite of passage, which involves genital mutilation. Now severely traumatized, she spends the rest of her life trying to reconcile her heritage with her experience as a modern woman in America.


    Brothers and Sisters by Campbell, Bebe Moore

    "This book is about succeeding — and surviving — even being happy, in a society where every card seems stacked against you. If this is a fair world, Bebe Moore Campbell will be remembered as the most important African-American novelist of this century — except for, maybe, Ralph Ellison and James Baldwin." — Carolyn See, Washington Post Book Review


    The Wedding by West, Dorothy

    Dorothy West founded the Harlem Renaissance literary magazine Challenge in 1934, and New Challenge in 1937, with Richard Wright as her associate editor.  She was a welfare investigator and WPA relief worker in Harlem during the Depression.  Her first novel, The Living Is Easy , appeared in 1948 and remains in print.  Her second novel, The Wedding , was a national bestseller and literary landmark when published in the winter of 1995.  A collection of her stories and autobiographical essays, The Richer, The Poorer , appeared during the summer of 1995.  She lives on Martha's Vineyard.


    Dessa Rose by Williams, Sherley Anne

    This acclaimed historical novel is based on two actual incidents: In 1829 in Kentucky, a pregnant black woman helped lead an uprising of a group of slaves headed to the market for sale. She was sentenced to death, but her hanging was delayed until after the birth of her baby. In North Carolina in 1830, a white woman living on an isolated farm was reported to have given sanctuary to runaway slaves. In Dessa Rose, the author asks the question: "What if these two women met?"From there the story unfolds: two strong women, one black, one white, form a forbidden and ambivalent alliance; a bold scheme is hatched to win freedom; trust is slowly extended and cautiously accepted as the two women unite and discover greater strength together than alone. United by fate but divided by prejudice, these two women are locked in a thrilling battle for freedom, sisterhood, friendship, and love.


    Going To Meet the Man by Baldwin, James

    Going to Meet the Man, published in 1965, is a short-story collection by American writer James Baldwin. It is concerned with racism in American society. The eight stories collected in the book are: "The Rockpile" "The Outing" "The Man Child" "Previous Condition" "Sonny's Blues" "This Morning, This Evening, So Soon" "Come Out the Wilderness" "Going to Meet the Man"


    Such Was the Season by Major, Clarence



    The White Boy Shuffle by Beatty, Paul



    Rl's Dream by Mosley, Walter



    Coffee Will Make You Black by Sinclair, April



    Bailey's Cafe by Naylor, Gloria



    Linden Hills by Naylor, Gloria



    A Rap On Race by Mead, Margaret and Baldwin, James



    Ain't Gonna Be the Same Fool Twice by Sinclair, April



    Just Plain Folks by Johnson-Coleman, Lorraine



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