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Byzantium
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Byzantium

By Cyril A. Mango

This book is in very good condition. There is very little wear on the front, back, edges, and spine of the cover boards. There is no bumping and very little fraying on the cover boards. The pages are crisp, white, and clear of any markings. "All empires have ruled over a diversity of peoples and in this respect the Byzantine Empire was no exception. Had its constituent population been reasonably well fused, had it been united in accepting the Empire's dominant civilization, it would hardly have been necessary to devote a chapter to this topic. It so happens, however, that even before the beginning of the Byzantine period - indeed, when the grand edifice of Rome started to show its first cracks towards the end of the second century AD - the various nations under Roman sway tended to move apart and assert their individuality. The rise of the Christian religion, far from healing this rift by the introduction of a universal allegiance, only accentuated it. We must, therefore, begin with the question: Who were the 'Byzantines'? In an attempt to answer it we shall undertake a rapid tour of the Empire, noting as we proceed the populations of the various provinces and the languages spoken by them. The time I have chosen is about 560 AD, shortly after the recovery by the Emperor Justinian of large parts of Italy and North Africa and several decades before the major ethnographic changes that were to accompany the disintegration of the Early Byzantine State...." - Chapter One from Byzantium: The Empire of New Rome

$40.70

Myths Of The Greeks And Romans
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Myths Of The Greeks And Romans

By Michael Grant

This book is in good condition. There is some wear on the font, back, edges, and spine of the cover boards. There is minimal bumping and fraying on the cover boards. The previous owner has left his name card on the front inside cover board. The pages are yellowing and tanning, but are clear of any markings. "The myths told by the Greeks and Romans are as important as history for our understanding of what those peoples, ancestor of our own civilization, believed and thought and felt, and expressed in writing and visual art. For their mythologies were inextricably interwoven, to an extent far beyond anything in our own experience, with the whole fabric of their public and private lives...." - Foreword from Myths Of The Greeks And Romans

$22.94

The Ministry in Historical Perspectives
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The Ministry in Historical Perspectives

By Edited by Richard Niebuhr and Daniel D. Wilbanks

This book is in good condition. There is some wear on the front, back, edges, and spine of the book. There is very little bumping and fraying on the cover boards. The previous owner has signed the first page of the book. The pages are yellowing and tanning, but the pages are clear of markings. "The Greek word for 'ministry' is diakonia; and it is significant that this term was in the New Testament times, as it is still, the most favored way of referring inclusively to the church's workers and their work. When Paul gives us the first account we posses of the various functions being performed by individuals in the primitive church (I Cor. 12:4-30), he speaks of them as 'varieties of ministry.' He can refer to himself and to other workers as 'ministers' of the new covenant, or of Christ, or of God, or of the church, or of the gospel, or simply as 'ministers,' and to their work as a 'ministry of reconciliation.' (II Cor. 3:6, 11:23, Col. 1:7, 25, 4:7, II Cor. 5:18; etc.) The letter to the Ephesians, probably a generation later, in summing up the significance of 'apostles,' 'prophets,' 'evangelists,' 'pastors and teachers,' uses the same word: 'for the work of the ministry.' In Acts the apostolate itself is referred to as a diakonia (Acts 1:17; cf. Eph. 4:11-12). The word, whether Greek or English, means simply 'service,' and although it soon came to stand for a particular ecclesiastical office, the office of the deacon, its original more inclusive sense was never completely lost. Thus "Timothy" is enjoined to appoint 'ministers' (in the sense of deacons) and to fulfill his own 'ministry' in the other, more general, sense; and the same writer, the author of the Pastoral Epistles, can both describe the qualifications of the 'deacons' and allude to the diakonia of Paul (I Tim. 1:12, 3:8, 12, 4:6; II Tim. 4:5). Thus also, even today, if we wish a term which includes the archbishop as well as the pastor of the humblest congregation, we speak of 'the ministry.' And so, in word at least, we obey Jesus' injunction: 'Whoever would be great among you must be your servant {diakonia}, and whoever would be first among you must be the slave of all' (Mark 10: 43-44)...." - Chapter One from The Ministry in Historical Perspectives

$12.50

Enemy Of Rome
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Enemy Of Rome

By Leonard Cottrell

This book is in good condition. There is minimal wear on the front, back, edges, and spine of the cover boards. There is no bumping and little fraying on the cover boards. The pages are yellowing and tanning, but there are no markings on the pages. "The consul had encamped in the evening on the side of the lake just within the present Roman frontier, and on the Tuscan side of Passignano; he had made a forced march, and had arrived at his position so late that he could not examine the ground before him. Early next morning he set forward again; the morning mist hung thickly over the lake and the low ground, leaving the heights, as is often the case, quite clear. Flaminius, anxious to overtake his enemy, rejoiced in the friendly veil which thus concealed his advance, and hoping to fall upon Hannibal's army while it was still in marching order and in columns encumbered with the plunder of the valley of Arno. He passed through the defile of Passignano and found no enemy; this confirmed him in his belief that Hannibal did not mean to fight. Already Hannibal's Numidian calvary were on the edge of the basin of the Tiber; unless he could overtake them speedily they would have reached the plain, and Africans, Spaniards and Gauls would be rioting in the devastation of the garden of Italy. In a R.A.F. hospital near Naples, in 1944, it is almost time for Lights Out. The Night Sister, making her inspection, consults her watch, Through the open windows which face north, distant flashes of gunfire suddenly silhouette the hills. Kesselring's army is retreating towards the Gustav Line, pressed hard by the advancing Allies, but not one of the figures under the mosquito nets looks up. Some are reading, some with hands clasped behind their heads, lie just thinking. A few are asleep...." - Chapter One from Enemy Of Rome

$12.32

The Republic
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The Republic

By Plato (Translated Into English By B. Jowett, M.A.)

This book is in good condition. There is significant wear on the front, back, spine, and edges of the cover boards. The corners of the book are bumped, and there is a large ink stain on the back cover board. The previous owners name is written on the inside of the front cover board and there are markings on the front end page and the title page. The pages are yellowed and tanned. "The Republic is undoubtedly one of Plato's masterworks and one of the most influential and widely read books in the history of philosophy. It is also devilishly difficult to truly understand. There are any number of reasons for this, but one of them is the sheer breadth of topics and issues that Plato introduces over the course of the dialogue. Readers must make sense not only of those issues in their own right but they must also understand them in relation to the larger themes and arguments of the work. This is, to be sure, a daunting task, particularly for readers who are approaching the dialogue for the first time. In his book, Gerasimos Santas aims to help the reader better understand The Republic by focusing on its central argument -- that we are better off just than unjust. He does this, though, through a particular methodological lens. In his preface, Santas states that The Republic is "a book that is always contemporary," and this sentiment carries through in the focus and method of his book. Santas divides his attention between offering a text-based exegesis of Plato's arguments regarding justice and critically engaging in the text in a way that is highly informed by the works of other, more contemporary, thinkers. The result is a book that gives its readers some grounding in the basic threads of argument in The Republic while also encouraging and empowering them to engage the text and see the arguments as making philosophical claims that are still relevant and worthy of our consideration today. Indeed it is this last thing -- Santas's critical engagement with the text and emphasis on getting the reader involved in its debates and arguments -- that is the real strength of this book...." - Understanding Plato's Republic Reviewed by Michelle Jenkins, Whitman College

$12.93

The Greek Orthodox Church
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The Greek Orthodox Church

By Panagiotis Bratsiotis

This book is in good condition. There is some wear and fading on the front, back, spine and edges of the cloth cover boards. The corners of the cover boards are bumped. The previous owners name is written on the inside of the front cover board. The pages are beginning to yellow and tan, but are clear of any markings. "The decree on Ecumenism of the Second Vatican Council has a section entitled, "The Spiritual Position of the Eastern Churches" which emphasizes their great importance: "All should realize that it is of supreme importance to understand, venerate, preserve, and foster the exceedingly rich liturgical and spiritual heritage of the Eastern Churches, in order faithfully to preserve the fullness of Christian tradition, and to bring about reconciliation between Eastern and Western Christians...." - Preface from The Greek Orthodox Church

$37.50