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Autograph Letter Signed
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Autograph Letter Signed

By HOWE, Samuel Gridley (1801-76)

The husband of "Battle Hymn of the Republic" composer Julia Ward Howe was a noted physician, ardent abolitionist (he was one of the "Secret Six" who funded John Brown's work) and tireless advocate of education for the blind -- he directed the Perkins Institution and personally taught Laura Bridgman, famed as the first blind and deaf person educated in the U.S. ALS, 1p + integral address leaf, Boston, MA, 10 January 1854. Addressed to Henry Ingersoll Bowditch. Near fine. Mounting traces on one border of integral address leaf. On pale blue "Perkins' Institution, and Massachusetts Asylum for the Blind" letterhead, Howe informs Bowditch that "I have the honor to inform you that you have been chosen life member of the Corporation of this Institution. The Corporation has unanimously appointed you one of the Trustees for the Current year...." Nicely penned and signed in brown ink, with address panel also in his hand. Bowditch (1808-92) was a prominent Boston physician and son of famed mathematician Nathaniel Bowditch and, like Howe, a radical abolitionist. The very year Howe penned this letter both he and Bowditch helped found a secret society called the Boston Anti-Man-Hunting League. An intriguing example.

$195.00

Autograph Note Signed
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Autograph Note Signed

By COUES, Samuel Elliott (1792-1967)

This noted New Hampshire civil leader and merchant (he part owned a handful of ships) served in the state legislature (1825-28, 1830) and as president of the Portsmouth Temperance Society and the American Peace Society (1841-46); he founded the New Hampshire Asylum for the Insane, worked at the U.S. Patent Office (1854-66), and penned page-turners such as "Outline of a System of Mechanical Philosophy" (1851), "Arithmetical Calculations of the Elements of the Orbit of the Moon" (1855) and "Studies of the Earth" (1860). ANS, 1p, 7 3/4" X 9 3/4", Portsmouth, NH, 25 January 1841. Addressed to John R. French (1819-90, publisher, editor, North Carolina congressman). Near fine. As a young man, French published and co-edited one of the first anti-slavery newspapers out of New Hampshire's capital city of Concord -- and in this letter the newly-named American Peace Society president sends French (as "Agent for the 'Herald of Freedom'") "three dollars wh.[ich] is to pay bal.[ance] due 93¢ and the balance as advance pay for the comeing year for which please give me credit" -- presumably a subscription to the pioneering "Herald of Freedom." Intriguing.

$75.00

Signature / Unsigned First Day Cover
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Signature / Unsigned First Day Cover

By WASHINGTON, Booker T. (1856-1915)

This noted educator, author and civil rights leader was born into slavery in Virginia and is best known for founding Tuskegee Institute in Alabama in 1881 and transforming it into the foremost college for blacks in this country; among his books, the bestselling 1901 memoir "Up from Slavery" is considered an important memoir by the most influential educator of his day. Clipped signature, bold and full in brown ink, on an irregular-shaped 5½" X 2" slip, n.p., n.y. Very good. "Yours truly," typed in blue ink appears at upper left, with his large signature below and a typed "Principal" near lower right. Accompanied by a 6½" X 3½" First Day cover featuring the 10¢ "Booker T. Washington" stamp at upper right, with "First Day of Issue" stamped and cancelled in Tuskegee Institute, Alabama on 7 April 1940. Very good. Lightly age toned. No recipient address and no pictorial cachet. Washington was the first African-American pictured on a U.S.postage stamp.

$395.00

Signed First Day Cover

By RICHARDS, Walter DuBois (1907-2006)

Versatile American artist, printer, watercolorist, lithographer and major illustrator throughout the golden age of advertising art (1930s-60s), during which he designed an astonishing 37 U.S. postage stamps. Signed First Day Cover, 6½" X 3½", cancelled in Washington, DC on 14 February 1967 and with "First Day of Issue" boldly stamped. Single Richards-designed 25-cent "Frederick Douglass" stamp at upper right. Near fine. Printed blue and gold "First Day Cover" decorative cachet at left; no distracting recipient's name/address. Near the center, Richards signs in full in blue ballpoint. Quite attractive.

$40.00

Document Signed
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Document Signed

By (SLAVERY -- WRIT OF REPLEVIN -- ST. CHARLES, MISSOURI). TUTER, Reuben (?-?)

Confidant of Missouri pioneer Jonathan Bryan (1759-1846) of the noted St. Charles family whose relatives included their neighbor Daniel Boone. DS, 1p, 7½" X 12", St. Charles County, MO, 1847 February 2. Near fine. Acknowledgment that Tuter, who signs himself as "Administrator of the Estate of Johnathan Bryan," has had a writ of replevin made out and issued to the St. Charles sheriff, Edward C. Cunningham (1809-65), for delivery to an unnamed offender. The writ seeks to recover the following property apparently wrongfully taken from Jonathan Bryan's estate: "one negro man a Slave named Heney one Two horse waggon and one pair of Briches Two Black horses one Lorrel horse with bold face one walnut Cupboard one clock one Bureau one bedstead and bedding one walnut Table one Trunk one Bible...." In other words, everything but the kitchen sink. Signed at the conclusion by Tater (in his definitely untutored hand). Tales of slaves are found in the Bryan family lore, such as: "Mrs. Jonathan Bryan, a kinswoman of Daniel Boone, was working in her yard with a slave woman when a boy slave screamed. She saw an Indian warrior heading for them with a tomahawk in one hand, and a gun in the other. The women ran for the house. Just as they were slamming the door, they caught the warrior's head and right arm between the door and facing. The slave woman grabbed the hatchet from his hand and killed him with a sharp blow. The women had barely recovered from their fright when the boy shouted again...." Could the slave boy in this old family legend by none less than the "Slave named Heney" whose return is demanded in this replevin suit? Quite unusual slavery item with an intriguing history.

$795.00