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Les Chefs-d'oeuvre d'Architecture et Sculpture du XIIe au XIXe Siecle

Paris: Ch. Massin, n.y.. Hardcover. Folio (18¼" X 13¼"). Grey cloth spine and marbled paper over boards with paper label string-tied portfolio housing 120 heavy stock rectos-only plates (+ half-title page, title page, 4pp table of contents). Extensive illustrations (1-2 photographs per plate). Overall very good. Portfolio soiled and age toned, with interior pastedowns age toned (dampstained?) near gutter; half-title page naturally shows more age toning than the remainder, which are mainly age toned about the edges, with images themselves untouched and handsome. Decent complete set of this large and lovely detailed photographic plates handsomely recording architectural details in French structures from the 12th through 19th centuries. Given their title page credit apparently sponsored by the "Musee de Sculpture Comparee (Palais de Trocadero)," the Museum of French Monuments founded in 1879, as part of their "Librairie Generale de l'Architecture et des Arts Decoratifs" series. Undated, but likely late 19th century. Scarce.

$250.00

Gothic Architecture Selected from Various Ancient Edifices in England

By PUGIN, A., and PUGIN, A.W.

Cleveland: J.H. Hansen, 1923. Hardcover. Complete 2-volume set. 4to. String-tied brown cloth spine and corners and tan paper over boards lettered in red portfolio housing heavy card stock loose sheets (title page, index and plates 1-170 in Volume I; title page, index and plates 171-337 in Volume II). Very good/near fine. Portfolios lightly soiled and faintly edgeworn only; title pages (only) a bit soiled and age toned. Handsome complete set of this large collection of detailed architectural renderings by French-English artist and architectural historian Augustus (1762-1832) and his architect son Augustus Welby (1812-52), who together helped spur the Gothic Revival of the early 18th century. This pair's two-volume "Specimens of Gothic Architecture" (1821-23) and three-volume "Examples of Gothic Architecture" (1831) are both contained in this work, here a "Complete Reprint without text." The upper left corner of every card bears the inkstamped name of "A.S. Graven, Inc.," the noted Chicago architectural firm responsible for many of that area's famed movie palaces and other structures.

$150.00

Palais Massimi a Rome

By (PALAZZO MASSIMO ALE COLONNE)

New York: The Architectural Book Publishing Company, n.y.. Hardcover. Folio (17" X 11 34"). String-tied slate blue spine and corners with tan printed paper over boards portfolio housing 42 loose heavy card stock 11½" X 16 3/4" sheets (rectos only). Good plus/near fine. Portfolio rubbed and slightly scuffed, with expert archival strengthening to spine -- complete and overall fairly attractive and handleable; top sheet (title page) slightly age toned, remainder only toned about the edges. Attractive and complete set of these detailed architectural renderings from this 16th century Renaissance palace in Rome designed by Baldassarre Peruzzi, first published in Paris by F.T. Suys et L.P. Haudebourt in 1818. Undated, but likely circa 1915. The blank verso of each card bears the inkstamped name of "A.S. Graven, Inc.," the Chicago architectural firm responsible for many of that area's famed movie palaces and other structures. The first edition is quite scarce in complete form and even this reprint a century later very uncommon.

$250.00

Collection of Glass Plate Negative Prints of Abraham Lincoln and Civil War Figures
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Collection of Glass Plate Negative Prints of Abraham Lincoln and Civil War Figures

By MESERVE, Frederick Hill (1865-1962)

Known as "America's first great photograph collector," this pioneering figure championed the preservation of historical photographs, traveling the country to rescue original glass plate negatives from certain destruction; so little appreciated and understood were they that he occasionally found them tossed aside in barns and sometimes even reused as glass panes in windows. Meserve managed to save countless original negatives created by Mathew B. Brady, Alexander Gardner and other seminal photographers from certain destruction. To the Lincoln images he assigned numbers ("Meserve numbers") still in use today. Meserve produced small format (2" X 3") prints from many of his negatives for a series of small print-run booklets, today highly desirable and sought after. For special occasions and friends he would produce large format prints using the original glass plate negatives. The immediacy of these first-generation prints is startling -- we've grown so accustomed to seeing umpteenth-generation reproductions of these portraits in various books that prints made off the original negative practically jump off the page. The blacks are black, the whites are white, and the overall clarity of the image brings out every detail -- a far cry from the washed-out reproductions seen elsewhere. Ralph G. Newman (1912-98) founded the noted Abraham Lincoln Book Shop in Chicago just before World War Two, changing from a general used book shop (House of Books, Inc.) to a specialist dealer at the urging of his friend Carl Sandburg. He befriended Frederick Hill Meserve and worked with him on a variety of Lincoln projects in the 1940s and '50s. Offered here is Ralph Newman's personal collection of Frederick Hill Meserve prints, acquired directly from Newman in 1989 and never before on the market. The collection begins with a full-page letter from Meserve to Newman dated December 4, 1952, discussing their mutual friend Carl Sandburg's upcoming 75th birthday and pondering what was probably an offer from Newman to purchase his glass plate negative collection - "I am too busy to play with it and count its thousands of items." The remainder of the collection consists of 22 prints (approximately 8" X 10", with two slightly smaller): Large prints consist of three Abraham Lincoln images and one exceptionally rare print of the hanging of the conspirators, one print of Jefferson Davis, eleven prints of important Union and Confederate generals (Grant, Sherman, Halleck, McClellan, McClellan and wife, Beauregard, Hooker, Jackson, Butterfield, Bragg, Butler), two Civil War-era journalists (Charles A. Dana and Marcus M. Pomeroy) and five small format prints (three of Daniel Webster and one each of author John Watts DePeyster and famed nurse Mary "Mother" Bickerdyke). These five small prints were made at Newman's request and Meserve inscribes each in pencil to Newman's friend Carl Haverlin (1899-1985), a noted Lincoln/Civil War scholar and radio broadcast pioneer, president of music licensing innovator BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.). Every large print is identified on the verso in Meserve's distinctive script in bold pencil (as was his habit), occasionally with a phrase noting "From a Brady original negative." Although Meserve was never consistent in noting this on his prints, it is believed he made all his prints from the original negative or the earliest state negative in his possession. The hanging of the Lincoln conspirators image is extraordinarily rare, and many others are extremely scarce in this original negative form of such unparalleled quality. The Lincoln images are especially collected and very seldom come on the market. A rare and handsome collection of first-generation Mathew Brady and other prints from the pre-eminent photography historian of the 20th century.

$15500.00

A Humble Petition to the President of Harvard
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A Humble Petition to the President of Harvard

By BEECHER, John

Phoenix, AZ: Rampart Press, 1963. Broadside. Folio (12½" X 16"). Titled in red. Limited to 250 copies printed on German mouldmade paper. Fine. First separate printing -- and although this broadside was never issued signed, Beecher's wife and printing partner, artist Barbara Beecher (1925-2016), handsomely signed a very small number in pencil at lower right and this is one such example. Although Beecher didn't graduate from Harvard, he did attend Harvard Graduate School for language and literature in 1926 -- hence his opening declaration here, "I am, sir, so to speak, 'a Harvard man.'" Possibly occasioned by a much later visit by Beecher to his almost-alma (he refers to "Nostalgic reminiscences brought on / by your most recent bulletin"), this delightful piece begins as a tribute to the legendary Harvard literature professor G.L. Kittredge (1860-1941), Shakespeare and Chaucer authority, prim and proper "in forked snowy beard and pearl-grey spats" whose teachings were equally fastidious: "Prince Hamlet / made no unseemly quips anent the thighs / Ophelia spread for him...." -- thus "Nice young men were we / in Kitty's class...." Personal recollections follow before a Lionel Trilling essay ("Commitment to the Modern") found in the "recent bulletin" shows the poet that "you do not change / at Harvard, like castrati whose voices / retain their boyish purity." Harvard's status quo conservative establishment, he suddenly realizes, rub this radical poet the wrong way: "Fend from me, I beg you, sir, / offers of chairs magnates endow. Waylay / me with no teaching sinecure.... Summon me never to recite my verse / before a convocation in my honor / nor to appear in doctoral costume / as orator at Commencement." A wonderfully dark, provocative, humorous poem. One of the great American protest and radical poets, Beecher left his steel mill background to teach English and sociology at various universities; he worked various positions under the New Deal; his first published poem, "And I Will Be Heard" (1940), placed him on the literary map, and the book-length narrative poem "Here I Stand" came the following year; during World War Two he sailed aboard the first racially integrated ship, the S.S. Booker T. Washington, and wrote about those experiences in "All Brave Sailors"; blacklisted from teaching by refusing to sign a state loyalty oath in California in 1950, he became a rancher and farmer in Sonoma County; there he continued writing, founding the award-winning Morning Star Press in 1956 to publish his poetry and other socially-oriented pieces, becoming a gifted and accomplished practitioner in the process; this press then operated from San Francisco, Berkeley, and Jerome, Arizona; renamed it relocated to Scottsdale, Arizona and other locales; "Report to the Stockholders & Other Poems" appeared in 1962 to critical acclaim and "To Live and Die in Dixie" in 1966; these later years were filled with guest teaching positions from Massachusetts to California, and Beecher was in great demand as a lecturer and poetry reader nationwide; descended from famed Abolitionists Henry Ward Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Lyman Beecher, much of John Beecher's poetry concerns itself with race relations, labor reform and other social injustices.

$95.00

Homage to a Subversive
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Homage to a Subversive

By BEECHER, John

Scottsdale, AZ: Rampart Press, 1961. Leaflet. Small 4to (6¼" X 9¼"). Near fine. Single horizontal fold, else pristine. First separate printing, a handsome production handset and pulled by the Beechers on their own press. One of Beecher's most famous poems, a tribute to Henry David Thoreau on the occasion of the upcoming centennial of his death. Beecher makes clear that Thoreau-type civil disobedience was as needed then (1961) as during Thoreau's lifetime. One of the great American protest and radical poets, Beecher left his steel mill background to teach English and sociology at various universities; he worked various positions under the New Deal; his first published poem, "And I Will Be Heard" (1940), placed him on the literary map, and the book-length narrative poem "Here I Stand" came the following year; during World War Two he sailed aboard the first racially integrated ship, the S.S. Booker T. Washington, and wrote about those experiences in "All Brave Sailors"; blacklisted from teaching by refusing to sign a state loyalty oath in California in 1950, he became a rancher and farmer in Sonoma County; there he continued writing, founding the award-winning Morning Star Press in 1956 to publish his poetry and other socially-oriented pieces, becoming a gifted and accomplished practitioner in the process; this press then operated from San Francisco, Berkeley, and Jerome, Arizona; renamed it relocated to Scottsdale, Arizona and other locales; "Report to the Stockholders & Other Poems" appeared in 1962 to critical acclaim and "To Live and Die in Dixie" in 1966; these later years were filled with guest teaching positions from Massachusetts to California, and Beecher was in great demand as a lecturer and poetry reader nationwide; descended from famed Abolitionists Henry Ward Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Lyman Beecher, much of John Beecher's poetry concerns itself with race relations, labor reform and other social injustices.

$40.00

A Humble Petition to the President of Harvard

By BEECHER, John

Phoenix, AZ: Rampart Press, 1963. Broadside. Folio (12½" X 16"). Titled in red. Limited to 250 copies printed on German mouldmade paper. Fine. First separate printing. Although Beecher didn't graduate from Harvard, he did attend Harvard Graduate School for language and literature in 1926 -- hence his opening declaration here, "I am, sir, so to speak, 'a Harvard man.'" Possibly occasioned by a much later visit by Beecher to his almost-alma (he refers to "Nostalgic reminiscences brought on / by your most recent bulletin"), this delightful piece begins as a tribute to the legendary Harvard literature professor G.L. Kittredge (1860-1941), Shakespeare and Chaucer authority, prim and proper "in forked snowy beard and pearl-grey spats" whose teachings were equally fastidious: "Prince Hamlet / made no unseemly quips anent the thighs / Ophelia spread for him...." -- thus "Nice young men were we / in Kitty's class...." Personal recollections follow before a Lionel Trilling essay ("Commitment to the Modern") found in the "recent bulletin" shows the poet that "you do not change / at Harvard, like castrati whose voices / retain their boyish purity." Harvard's status quo conservative establishment, he suddenly realizes, rub this radical poet the wrong way: "Fend from me, I beg you, sir, / offers of chairs magnates endow. Waylay / me with no teaching sinecure.... Summon me never to recite my verse / before a convocation in my honor / nor to appear in doctoral costume / as orator at Commencement." A wonderfully dark, provocative, humorous poem. One of the great American protest and radical poets, Beecher left his steel mill background to teach English and sociology at various universities; he worked various positions under the New Deal; his first published poem, "And I Will Be Heard" (1940), placed him on the literary map, and the book-length narrative poem "Here I Stand" came the following year; during World War Two he sailed aboard the first racially integrated ship, the S.S. Booker T. Washington, and wrote about those experiences in "All Brave Sailors"; blacklisted from teaching by refusing to sign a state loyalty oath in California in 1950, he became a rancher and farmer in Sonoma County; there he continued writing, founding the award-winning Morning Star Press in 1956 to publish his poetry and other socially-oriented pieces, becoming a gifted and accomplished practitioner in the process; this press then operated from San Francisco, Berkeley, and Jerome, Arizona; renamed it relocated to Scottsdale, Arizona and other locales; "Report to the Stockholders & Other Poems" appeared in 1962 to critical acclaim and "To Live and Die in Dixie" in 1966; these later years were filled with guest teaching positions from Massachusetts to California, and Beecher was in great demand as a lecturer and poetry reader nationwide; descended from famed Abolitionists Henry Ward Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Lyman Beecher, much of John Beecher's poetry concerns itself with race relations, labor reform and other social injustices.

$75.00

On Acquiring a Cistercian Breviary

By BEECHER, John

Phoenix, AZ: Rampart Press, 1963. Broadside. 4to (9" X 12½"). Titled in blue. Edition limited to 200 copies. Fine. First separate printing. Dedicated to Father M. Louis, O.C.S.O. -- better known as Thomas Merton (1915-68), the celebrated Trappist monk with the Cistercian Order of the Strict Observance. Ruminations on faith and the monastic life brought on by perusing "these old volumes that my hands / profane." One of the great American protest and radical poets, Beecher left his steel mill background to teach English and sociology at various universities; he worked various positions under the New Deal; his first published poem, "And I Will Be Heard" (1940), placed him on the literary map, and the book-length narrative poem "Here I Stand" came the following year; during World War Two he sailed aboard the first racially integrated ship, the S.S. Booker T. Washington, and wrote about those experiences in "All Brave Sailors"; blacklisted from teaching by refusing to sign a state loyalty oath in California in 1950, he became a rancher and farmer in Sonoma County; there he continued writing, founding the award-winning Morning Star Press in 1956 to publish his poetry and other socially-oriented pieces, becoming a gifted and accomplished practitioner in the process; this press then operated from San Francisco, Berkeley, and Jerome, Arizona; renamed it relocated to Scottsdale, Arizona and other locales; "Report to the Stockholders & Other Poems" appeared in 1962 to critical acclaim and "To Live and Die in Dixie" in 1966; these later years were filled with guest teaching positions from Massachusetts to California, and Beecher was in great demand as a lecturer and poetry reader nationwide; descended from famed Abolitionists Henry Ward Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Lyman Beecher, much of John Beecher's poetry concerns itself with race relations, labor reform and other social injustices.

$75.00

Signed Color Print
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Signed Color Print

By WENDELIN, Rudolph (1910-2000)

This Virginia artist joined the U.S. Forest Service in the early 1930s and helped launch the "Smokey the Bear" campaign in the late '30s -- now the longest running public service campaign in history; he portrayed Smokey in literally hundreds of promotional pieces that encouraged conservation of natural resources and fire prevention. Signed Color Print, 16" X 10¼", n.p., n.y. [ca. 1991]. Fine. Printed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and titled "'High Five' for fire prevention," this print depicts a wooded outdoor scene, a red fire engine in the right foreground driving toward the viewer. One firefighter leans out the passenger window to give a "High Five" to Smokey Bear, who of course stands center foreground, holding a shovel in his left hand and returning the "High Five" with his right. At left foregound is a large pine tree, with a couple of bear cubs clambering up and watching the fire engine, while other wildlife (squirrel, raccoon, cardinal) hang about. At lower left, across part of the red fire engine, Wendelin signs large and bold in black fineline. A handsome piece. The number printed is not stated or generally known, but sources involved in its production indicate that Wendelin signed only a modest number of them. A superb rendition of this beloved character, in flawless condition. Uncommon and most handsome, this is a choice bit of American firefighting history.

$175.00

Mirror Lake Yosemite Valley
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Mirror Lake Yosemite Valley

By (PICTURESQUE AMERICA / PRINT / YOSEMITE VALLEY)

New York: D. Appleton & Co, 1872. Steel engraving. 4to (12½" X 9¼"). Near fine. Faint age toning at edges. Wonderfully bright and sharp heavy stock steel engraving from the first edition (1872-74) of editor William Cullen Bryant's landmark "Picturesque America; Or, The Land We Live In. A Delineation by Pen and Pencil of the Mountains, Rivers, Lakes, Waterfalls, Shores, Canyons, Valleys, Cities, and Other Picturesque Features of Our Country," a hefty two-volume study of America's scenery in words and fine steel engraving considered highly influential to American tourism. In this depiction of the glacial valley in the western Sierra Nevada Mountains of northern California, the smooth-as-glass lake features a hunter in the right foreground lying prone in the front of a canoe, having just fired his rifle at a deer swimming ahead of him at center foreground; a sandbar and island appear at dead center, and behind that the heavily-forested lake's edge, with majestic mountains rising in the distance; the lake reflects the woods and mountains so sharply viewers almost feel they are looking at a photograph. Most of the "Picturesque America" engravings were printed on regular text-weight stock, and a much smaller number (such as this example) on a fine, heavy stock -- and unlike most of them, this particular scene has no artist and/or engraver's name included at lower right and lower left of the image.

$65.00

Quebec
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Quebec

By (PICTURESQUE AMERICA / PRINT / QUEBEC)

New York: D. Appleton & Co, 1874. Steel engraving. 4to (12.¼" X 9"). Very good. Faint bit of age toning at edges. A sharp, attractive heavy stock steel engraving from the first edition (1872-74) of editor William Cullen Bryant's landmark "Picturesque America; Or, The Land We Live In. A Delineation by Pen and Pencil of the Mountains, Rivers, Lakes, Waterfalls, Shores, Canyons, Valleys, Cities, and Other Picturesque Features of Our Country," a hefty two-volume study of America's scenery in words and fine steel engraving considered highly influential to American tourism. "Quebec" was engraved by one of this work's most notable engravers, Robert Hinshelwood (b. 1812), a Scottish-born artist remembered for his landscapes, based on a painting by noted landscape artist and illustrator John Douglas Woodward (1846-1924). This delightful cityscape shows a rural foreground, the Saint Lawrence River laden with rowboats, steamboats and sailboats of every size in the middle ground and a large city loming up on the hills and bluffs on the far side, extending almost to the horizon, where mountains are faintly visible in the distance. Most of the engravings were printed on regular text-weight stock, and a much smaller number (such as this example) on a fine, heavy stock.

$60.00

Golden Gate (From Telegraph Hill)
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Golden Gate (From Telegraph Hill)

By (PICTURESQUE AMERICA / PRINT / SAN FRANCISCO)

New York: D. Appleton & Co, 1873. Steel engraving. 4to (12½" X 9¼"). Near fine. Bit of age toning along some edges. Bright and attractive heavy stock steel engraving from the first edition (1872-74) of editor William Cullen Bryant's landmark "Picturesque America; Or, The Land We Live In. A Delineation by Pen and Pencil of the Mountains, Rivers, Lakes, Waterfalls, Shores, Canyons, Valleys, Cities, and Other Picturesque Features of Our Country," a hefty two-volume study of America's scenery in words and fine steel engraving considered highly influential to American tourism. "Golden Gate" was engraved by one of this work's most noteworthy engravers, Edward Paxman Brandard (1819-98), based on a landscape engraving by the noted artist James David Smillie (1833-1909). San Francisco is pictured at daybreak from atop this high point: A few pedestrians in the foreground gaze out over the building-covered hills in the middle distance, with the ship-filled bay extending out into the horizon. Most of the "Picturesque America" engravings were printed on regular text-weight stock, and a much smaller number (such as this example) on a fine, heavy stock.

$65.00

Lee's General Order Number Nine
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Lee's General Order Number Nine

By (LEE, Robert E.)

Chicago: R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company, n.y.. Paperback. Folio. Stiff blue portfolio with paper label housing 4to facsimile and 8pp explanatory text. Fine/very good. Facsimile and text fine; inoffensive small edge tear at lower edge of portfolio expertly, archivally mended. Handsome copy of this superb facsimile of Lee's farewell to his troops based on pioneering Battle Creek, Michigan autograph dealer Forest H. Sweet's original, which he felt to be an official copy, not a postwar souvenir copy. Printed on light blue stock, this facsimile is faithful down to the watermark, the fold lines, the faintly irregular edges, the light age toning to certain portions, the ink smears -- every last detail. Only one edition of this was produced, with paper label noting, "Reproduced by / Donnelley Deeptone Offset." Though undated, evidence elsewhere suggests a 1955 publication date.

$60.00

Early Connecticut Architecture: Second Series -- Measured Drawings With Full Size Details of Moulded Sections Supplemented by Photographs

By KELLY, J. Frederick

New York: William Helburg, 1931. Complete collection of 20 folio (14½" X 20") heavy stock prints and folio (10" X 14½") leaflet with title page, list of plates and foreword. Very good overall. Occasional minor edgewear, but all images bright and handsome. Housed in original plain cardboard wraparound sleeve with modern paper labels. Nice first edition of the second in this series (First Series issued 1924), a delightful romp through architectural details on noted colonial-era residences in the cities of Essex, Lyme, North Branford, New Haven, Southington, Hamburg, Suffield, Litchfield, Bethany, Ansonia, Hamden, Guilford and Redding -- front entrances, cornice details, windows, panelling and mantels, arches, interior doors, corner cupboards, staircases. Fascinating and lovely -- ideal for framing.

$75.00

State of Illinois Sixty-Fifth General Assembly House of Representatives Resolution....

By (COAL MINING -- CENTRALIA, ILLINOIS)

Springfield: State of Illinois, 1947. Broadside. Folio (12½" X 16½"). Very good. Single horizontal fold; lightly age toned, with mat darkening along right and bottom margins (not affecting border or text). Within a thick decorative border, this "true and official copy of House Resolution No. 44 of the Sixty-fifth General Assembly" opens: "Whereas, On Tuesday, March 25, 1947, there perished in an explosion at Mine No. 5 of the Centralia Coal Company, the following men" -- followed by four columns listing the names of 111 men, making this one of the worst coal mine disasters in U.S. history. Additional "Whereas"s note "the horror of their sudden death and the shock to parents, wives and children" and that "The whole state has been deeply aggrieved at the suffering and sorrow with which the community of Centralia has been afflicted." Copies of this Resolution were prepared for the families of those who lost their lives. Large circular flute-edged blind-embossed gold foil seal at lower left, signed by Fred W. Ruegg (Clerk of the House) immediately above. Signed at lower right by Hugh Green (Speaker of the House) and by Edward J. Barrett (Secretary of State). Despite margin toning that could easily be matted out, an impressive display piece. Produced in a small quantity and rarely found.

$175.00

Carry On With Franklin D. Roosevelt / For Vice-President Henry A. Wallace

By (ROOSEVELT, Franklin D. / WALLACE, Henry A. / Handbills)

Belleville, NJ: Sweeney Litho Co., Inc, n.y.. Attractive pair of 1940 presidential campaign handbills. 4to (each 8¼" X 11"). Very good. Minor edgewear and several small archivally-closed (on verso) edge tears. The FDR handbill consists of a well-known Pach Bros. head-and-shoulders portrait of Roosevelt, with "Carry On With" in large typeface on the top margin and "Franklin D. Roosevelt" in large typeface on the lower margin. The Wallace handbill consists of a closer-up head-and-shoulders informal portrait, with "For Vice-President" in large typeface on the top margin and "Henry A. Wallace" in large typeface on the lower margin. This pair were also issued in a larger size.

$75.00

Anastasia
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Anastasia

By (LOBBY CARDS)

N.p.: National Screen Service Corp, 1956. Complete set of 8 color lobby cards. Heavy stock 14" X 11". Very good overall. Minor soiling and occasional faint edgewear, with paper clip mark near center of top edge of each. Attractive and complete numbered set of lobby cards for this 1956 drama directed by Anatole Litvak and produced by Buddy Adler using Arthur Laurents screenplay. Ingrid Bergman won the 1957 "Best Actress in a Leading Role" for her portrayal of the destitute and suicidal woman coached by a Russian businessman (Yul Brynner) to pretend she is the Grand Duchess Anastasia. Helen Hayes, Akim Tamiroff, Natalie Schafer, Martita Hunt and Felix Aylmer also appear. Each yellow-bordered lobby card features a different color film scene.

$200.00

Shoemaking in early Illinois

By KRAFT, Jack

N.p.: Central Illinois Public Service Company, 1968. 14" X 11". Printed entirely in brown ink, this scene shows a cobbler at work on a shoe in a small and cluttered early Illinois cabin as a young girl perched on a stool observes and a bearded old man in the background reads. Very good. Faintest of edgewear. Probable sole printing. One in a series of prints issued in commemoration of the Illinois Sesquicentennial.

$20.00

Louis Philippe, King of the French / Her Majesty Maria, Amelia, Consort of Louis Philippe, King of the French

By GERARD, Francois

N.p.: Whittaker & Co, 1830. Pair of hand-colored steel-engraved head-and-shoulder portraits, each 5" X 8½" (each matted in tan to 12" X 16"). Fine. A striking pair of portraits by the French artist to the royals (1770-1837), Louis Philippe engraved by James Thomson and Maria Amelia by T.A. Dean. Quite handsome.

$95.00

Out of the North: A Brief Historical Sketch of the Blackfeet Indian Tribe

By LINDERMAN, Frank Bird

St. Paul: Great Northern Railway Co., 1947. Paperback. 4to. Wrappers. 12pp. Very good. Tight, nice first edition of this pamphlet, accompanied by all 24 color 9" X 12 prints of Blackfeet Indians by noted German-born American artist Winold Reiss (1886-1953). The prints are all very good, each with pin pricks at top corners and occasionally on lower edge as well, but not affecting the images. The original printed envelope is not present, but the entire portfolio is housed in a large heavy gauge mylar sleeve.

$75.00

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