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PORTER'S SPIRIT OF THE TIMES. A Chronicle of the Turf, Field Sports, Literature and the Stage. Volume I, Nos. 1 - 26
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PORTER'S SPIRIT OF THE TIMES. A Chronicle of the Turf, Field Sports, Literature and the Stage. Volume I, Nos. 1 - 26

By [BASEBALL]

New York: [Wm. Porter & George Wilkes], 1856-1857. First Edition. Hardcover. Minor foxing, some pages browned, some unopened, lacking pages 69-72 and 81-84 (there is no baseball information on those pages). Binding quite nice. Overall Near Fine. Folio (10-3/4" x 16") in the original cloth rebacked with a recent brown morocco leather spine, lettered in gilt, and corners; original morocco label with the name "James Burnside" in gilt on the front cover; 416 (of 424) pages. Illustrated with a color frontispiece of a racing horse, "Flora Temple." The debut volume with 26 issues of this important sports newspaper containing accounts of horse races, billiards, cricket matches, chess, and some of the earliest reportage of baseball games including printed box scores (developed by Henry Chadwick in 1856) and rule changes. The National Association of Base Ball Players was the first baseball organization to extend beyond a single club, and its birth coincides neatly with this first volume of PORTER'S. The first hint comes in Volume 1, issue #7, page 93 (11 October 1856): "It is said that a Convention of all the Base Ball Clubs of this city and suburbs will be held this fall, for the purpose of considering whether any and what amendments to the rules and laws governing this game should be made." The 8 November 1856 issue gives an account that reveals the gentlemanly nature of the game at that time describing the toasts offered, lyrics of a song performed solo, and other remarks made to the crowd, though the writer notes that catches were made on the fly, "instead of the child's play, 'from the bound.'" The 6 December 1856 issue contains rules for "The American National Game of Base Ball as played by the Putnam Club of New York illustrated with a diagram of the field: "We have been so inundated with communications in reference to the mode of playing the game of Base Ball, that although we gave the directions in our last issue as to where the rules of the game could be purchased, we have concluded to give a diagram and the rules in order that those who desire to form clubs may be prepared for action at the commencement of the next season." This evokes a response in a later issue by New England correspondent "Bob Lively" who describes "how they play the game in New England" with its own and different diagram: "The ball was thrown, not pitched or tossed, as a gentleman who has seen 'Base' played in New York tells me it is; it was thrown, and with a vigor, too, that made it whistle through the air, and stop with a solid smack in the catcher's hands, which he generally held directly in front of his face." The first baseball convention was reported at length on 31 January 1857, with a patriotic flourish: "Base Ball ... ought to be looked upon in this country with the same national enthusiasm as Cricket and Foot Ball are regarded in the British Islands.... There should be some one game peculiar to the citizens of the United States." The organization formed at that time can be considered the birth of organized league baseball in America. Much more. Very scarce peek into the beginnings of our national pastime.

$5000.00

MEDICAL FLORA; OR, MANUAL OF THE MEDICAL BOTANY OF THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA. Containing a selection of above 100 figures and descriptions of medical plants, with their names, qualities, properties, history, &c.: And notes or remarks on nearly 500 equivalent substitutes
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MEDICAL FLORA; OR, MANUAL OF THE MEDICAL BOTANY OF THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA. Containing a selection of above 100 figures and descriptions of medical plants, with their names, qualities, properties, history, &c.: And notes or remarks on nearly 500 equivalent substitutes

By RAFINESQUE, C(onstantine) S(amuel)

Philadelphia: Atkinson & Alexander (first volume); Samuel C. Atkinson (second volume), 1828 & 1830. First Edition. Hardcover. Minor chip here and there; plate 26 with clean horizontal tear with no loss; contents generally clean and binding Fine. Overall Near Fine. Two duodecimo (4-1/4" x 7-1/4") volumes bound in recent burgundy cloth-backed off-white boards with title information printed in black on both boards and printed white paper spine labels, new endpapers. Illustrated with 100 plates printed in green ink on varying sheet sizes. In this work, of which a projected third volume was never published, Rafinesque attempted to provide a comprehensive guide of native flora for the use of American doctors and pharmacists. Rafinesque made important botanical explorations on his 2,000-mile tour, mostly on foot, to the west of the Alleghenies in 1818. This work includes a number of previously unpublished Native American remedies. Garrison-Morton 1849; Nissen, Botany 1579; Norman 1774; Pritzel 7401; Sabin 67457.

$3125.00

LE COLONIE UNITE DELL'AMERICA SETTENTR[IONA]LE. DI NUOVO PROJEZIONE
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LE COLONIE UNITE DELL'AMERICA SETTENTR[IONA]LE. DI NUOVO PROJEZIONE

By [ATLAS] ZATTA, Antonio

Venice: Antonio Zatta, 1778. First Edition. Softcover. Some minor worming to inner marginal folds of maps, occasional spotting. Complete with vibrant coloring. Close to Fine. Oblong folio (16 1/4" x 12") bound in contemporary limp decorated paper covers. Containing 15 double-page engraved maps (including the double-page title), each beautifully hand-colored, depicting Bermuda; the east coast of North America from Nova Scotia to Florida, west to the Great Lakes and south to "Luigiana" and "Messico"; Lake Superior and its coast, with an inset of eastern Florida, including the Keys and Bahamas; Canada, between the Ottawa River and Hudson Bay; Labrador; Lake Michigan, including parts of Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa; Lake Huron, Ontario, Erie, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, the Hudson River, Long Island, and western New England; the Canadian and New England coast from Acadia and the Bay of Fundy, down the coast to the Long Island Sound; Virginia, the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, Louisiana, and the Carolinas; Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia, and the Carolinas; Jamaica; the Gulf of Mexico, including the coast between Florida and New Orleans, north into Indian territory; the east coast of northern Florida, Georgia, up to Cape Fear; Newfoundland and Cape Breton; and Hudson Bay.

$10625.00

THIRTEENTH AMENDMENT. JOINT RESOLUTION OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH CONGRESS ... PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION ... ABOLISHING SLAVERY. RESOLVED
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THIRTEENTH AMENDMENT. JOINT RESOLUTION OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH CONGRESS ... PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION ... ABOLISHING SLAVERY. RESOLVED

By [AFRICAN-AMERICANA] LINCOLN, Abraham

Chicago: Western Bank Note & Engraving Co., 1868. First Edition. Framed Document. Two chips on the right margin affecting decorative border; two long closed tears at the top with no loss; two holes at the center, the largest causing loss of a few letters of the signatures; a few minor creases and tears. Overall Very Good with a fine presentation, not examined out of the frame. Large folio (16-1/4" x 21-3/4") matted and framed to an overall size of 21-1/2" x 27." Finely engraved and printed on good quality paper with elaborate decorative borders with a "US" monogram to upper corners, a bold calligraphic heading with "ABOLISHING SLAVERY" in prominent decorated letters; at top center is a small vignette of the pyramid and all-seeing eye above an oval vignette of a slave family with child mourning over a cameo portrait of Lincoln. This is followed by the engraved signatures of President Lincoln, Vice President Hamlin, Schuyler Colfax and J. W. Forney (Speaker and Secretary of the Senate), and 164 Senators and Congressmen. An exceedingly rare and beautiful printing of the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude ... Shall exist within the United States...." This elaborately engraved Reconstruction-era broadside, is based on the special "souvenir" copies on parchment signed by Lincoln and the others, of which only a handful are known to have been made. The Thirteenth Amendment represents the first substantive change to how America interpreted those liberties guaranteed by the Bill of Rights since its ratification in 1791. The Emancipation Proclamation only freed the slaves in the openly rebellious states. The Amendment effectively put an end to slavery once and for all upon its passage on 1 February 1865.

$15625.00

THE COOK NOT MAD, OR RATIONAL COOKERY; BEING A COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL AND SELECTED RECEIPTS Embracing not only the art of curing various kinds of meat and vegetables for future use, but of Cooking, in its general acceptation, to the taste, habits, and degrees of luxury, Prevalent with the American Publick in Town and Country. To Which are Added, Directions for preparing comforts for the Sick Room; together with sundry Miscellaneous kinds of information, of importance to housekeepers in general, nearly all tested by experience
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THE COOK NOT MAD, OR RATIONAL COOKERY; BEING A COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL AND SELECTED RECEIPTS Embracing not only the art of curing various kinds of meat and vegetables for future use, but of Cooking, in its general acceptation, to the taste, habits, and degrees of luxury, Prevalent with the American Publick in Town and Country. To Which are Added, Directions for preparing comforts for the Sick Room; together with sundry Miscellaneous kinds of information, of importance to housekeepers in general, nearly all tested by experience

By [COOKERY]

Watertown, NY: Knowlton & Rice, 1831. Second Edition. Hardcover. Foxing throughout, some leaves closely trimmed, lacking original endpapers, repairs to title and a few other pages with no loss of text, two leaves bound out of order. Well used but text complete in a handsome binding. Overall Very Good. Small octavo (3" x 5-1/2") bound in recent full brown morocco leather with title and publication date in gilt on the front cover; (i-iii), iv-v, (7-120) pages. Published one year after the First Edition, this delightful early American cookery and household management book was designed to teach the preparation of "Good republican dishes," instead of "English, French, and Italian methods of rendering things indigestible." The emphasis is on American ingredients: cranberries, corn, turkeys, pigeons, watermelon, etc. Includes recipes and instructions for general cookery and housekeeping, preserving and dyeing, pesticides, gardening, simple medicines and cleansers. Included are recipes for Tasty Indian Pudding, Federal Pancakes, Good Rye and Indian Bread (cornmeal), Johnnycake, Indian Slapjack, Washington Cake, and Jackson Jumbles. In spite of the author's American intentions, the book does include some foreign influences and contains one of the earliest known recipes for shish-kebab in American cookbooks. Cagle 180; Lowenstein 127. WorldCat locates only the Huntington Library copy of this edition. This same book was published in 1831 in Canada as well with the word "Canadian" substituted for "American" in the subtitle and is commonly referred to as Canada's first cookbook.

$1875.00

A YANKEE IN CANADA, WITH ANTI-SLAVERY AND REFORM PAPERS
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A YANKEE IN CANADA, WITH ANTI-SLAVERY AND REFORM PAPERS

By THOREAU, Henry David

Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1866. First Edition. Hardcover. Internally Fine in a Fine, attractive binding. Bound in modern half dark green morocco leather and marbled boards with matching morocco corners with new endpapers. BAL 20117: only 1546 copies printed. Borst A7.1.a notes 1500 copies printed. Edited by Sophia Thoreau. Distinguished for its containing, in addition to the title piece, the first book publication of "Civil Disobedience" and "Life Without Principle," Thoreau's two most famous essays, as well as all of his major political writings. "Civil Disobedience" influenced, among others, Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. who cited it as his first intellectual contact with the theory of nonviolent resistance.

$1125.00

ON OUR WAY
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ON OUR WAY

By ROOSEVELT, Franklin Delano

New York: The John Day Company, (1934). First Edition. Hardcover. Near Fine in a Very Good or better dustwrapper with foxing to the front panel. A dummy copy with half-title, title page with copyright on verso, a printed explanatory page, an excerpt from Chapter 7, a printed statement of upcoming publication, and several pages of order forms. The bulk of the full-sized book is composed of blank pages. The front endpaper contains a written statement initialed "JB" and dated 1 April 1934 stating the book is an "Autographed Copy." Perhaps an April Fool's joke? Without the number "1" on the copyright page and the front dustwrapper flap, both previously believed to be points for the first printing but which should now be questioned as this copy came out before the book was officially published.

$937.50

ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT: AN ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE THE LITERARY SOCIETIES OF AMHERST COLLEGE, ON THE AFTERNOON PRECEDING COMMENCEMENT, 25TH AUGUST, 1835
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ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT: AN ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE THE LITERARY SOCIETIES OF AMHERST COLLEGE, ON THE AFTERNOON PRECEDING COMMENCEMENT, 25TH AUGUST, 1835

By EVERETT, Edward

n.p., [1835]. Manuscript. Blank wrappers soiled, a few chips; internally Fine. Stitched wraps (8" x 9-3/4") consisting of a title and 65 pages bound together with a ribbon, all edges gilt. A lengthy, closely written MANUSCRIPT by Edward Everett, not signed though initialed after his instructions. An early oration from Edward Everett (1794-1865), Whig politician, U.S. Representative and Senator, sometime President of Harvard University, United States Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Britain, and Governor of Massachusetts before being appointed United States Secretary of State. On the back of the title-page, Everett has penciled, "[The compositor will please not to cut nor tear this manuscript, but preserve it as clean as he can conveniently].... E.E." The compositor accomplished the required feat. The oration was published in Boston by Russell, Shattuck, & Williams in 1835. In this commencement address Everett discusses the extension of the means of education and the societal benefits of the general diffusion of knowledge to liberty, science, and virtue. Edward Everett is perhaps best known for his oratory powers. It is he who gave the "other" address at Gettysburg on 19 November 1863. The next day he wrote Lincoln saying, "I should be glad if I could flatter myself that I came as near the central idea of the occasion in two hours as you did in two minutes.

$4375.00

ON CANADA'S FRONTIER. SKETCHES OF HISTORY, SPORT, AND ADVENTURE AND OF THE INDIANS, MISSIONARIES, FUR-TRADERS, AND NEWER SETTLERS OF WESTERN CANADA
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ON CANADA'S FRONTIER. SKETCHES OF HISTORY, SPORT, AND ADVENTURE AND OF THE INDIANS, MISSIONARIES, FUR-TRADERS, AND NEWER SETTLERS OF WESTERN CANADA

By (REMINGTON, Frederic) RALPH, Julian

New York: Harper & Brothers, 1892. First Edition. Hardcover. A few pages with some staining, generally clean. Light edgewear. Very Good. Frederic Remington. Decorated reddish-brown cloth. Illustrated by Frederic Remington including many images of Native Americans and life on the frontier. Pencil owner signature of Charles B. Duryea on the front pastedown, likely the same person who in 1914 shot to death his octogenarian father, Gen. Hiram Duryea, famous as the commander of a regiment of Zouaves in the Civil War.

$62.50

COLLECTION OF 23 ORIGINAL ISSUES OF THE NILES’ WEEKLY REGISTER, 1836, DESCRIBING THE DRAMATIC AND HEROIC STRUGGLE FOR TEXAN INDEPENDENCE, with the text of the Texas Declaration of Independence
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COLLECTION OF 23 ORIGINAL ISSUES OF THE NILES’ WEEKLY REGISTER, 1836, DESCRIBING THE DRAMATIC AND HEROIC STRUGGLE FOR TEXAN INDEPENDENCE, with the text of the Texas Declaration of Independence

By [TEXAS] Hezekiah Niles, editor.

Baltimore: Printed by the Editor at the Franklin Press, March 5 to August 27, 1836. First Edition. Softcover. Light, occasional foxing or stain, a few issues with ragged left edge. Near Fine. A collection of 23 consecutive individual issues (5-3/4" x 9-1/2"; without the March 12, June 18, and July 9 issues) now housed in individual sleeves with typed descriptions in a hard 3-hole binder. From March to August, the Weekly Register, one of the most popular national news magazines of its time, printed a wealth of information on the struggle for Texas independence, including information on the Battle of the Alamo, the victory of Sam Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, and mentions of the celebration of independence. First-hand accounts by Americans who were engaged in the cause of Texan independence. Page 99 is a banner entry in Niles', as this one page contains four major pieces regarding Texas independence: an early account of Davy Crockett's speech to the people of Tennessee that "they might all go to Hell, and I would go to Texas" if they did not re-elect him; a letter from Martin Parmer to his wife from the Convention at Washington-on-the-Brazos dated March 6, 1836 (the day the Alamo fell); an early printing of Sam Houston's March 5 "Army Orders"; and the full text of the Texas Declaration of Independence (concluded on the next page). A wonderful collection of Niles' Weekly Register, chock full of Texas history. March 5, 1836. P. 3. Brief notice about “force of 2,500 Mexicans advancing upon Texas...” March 19, 1836. Pp. 33, 35-36. Brief notice about “people of Texas divided” and Gen. Houston and Col. Bowie were displaced from their commands in the army; Tampico Expedition - William Christy prosecuted for transporting volunteers to Texas. March 26, 1836. Pp. 51, 52-53. Santa Anna and his army on march upon Texas; volunteers returning from Texas because of food shortages. April 2, 1836. Pp. 85-87. Call to arms to the people of Texas against the “tyrant of Mexico.” April 9, 1836. Pp. 89-112. Includes (pp. 99-100) the Texas “Declaration of Independence.” April 16, 1836. Pp. 113-128. Includes news about the fall of the Alamo (p. 121). April 23, 1836. Pp. 129-130. Fort Goliad blown up, Col. Fanning joins Gen. Houston, Georgia volunteers attack much larger force at Refugo, more. April 30, 1836. Pp. 149-150. Texas fight becomes fierce, reported butcheries. May 7, 1836. Pp. 161-184. Includes Santa Anna’s proclamation to his army (p. 162). May 14, 1836. Pp. 185-187. Boundary questions. May 21, 1836. Pp. 201-216. Includes Battle of San Jacinto - Victory of Houston’s army (p. 206). May 28, 1836. Pp. 217-232. Includes Battle of San Jacinto (p. 220). June 4, 1836. P. 240. Capture of Santa Anna, actual correspondence of Gen. Houston. June 11, 1836. Pp. 249, 258. Gen. Houston reported to be in bad health, arrives in New Orleans; Santa Anna under strong guard at Velasco, presented cane and saddle to Gen. Houston. June 25, 1836. Pp. 282, 293-294. Texas commissioner Col. Wharton denies rumor that Gen. Houston would be deprived of command of the army; official account of Texian victory. July 2, 1836. Pp. 297, 310-311. Santa Anna’s vindication; Gens. Houston and Hamilton. July 16, 1836. Pp. 329, 335-337. Treaty between Republic of Texas and Santa Anna; President Burnett’s proclamation; more. July 23, 1836. Pp. 345, 350-351. Texas celebration at American Hotel, NYC; Texas commissioners receive prisoners. July 30, 1836. Pp. 361, 365-366. Lamar appointed major general and commander of Texian army; Santa Anna taken to Columbia, attempt to shoot him; address of Gen. Lamar to Army of Texas. August 6, 1836. Pp. 383-386. Mexican army diminishing by desertion; Gen. Rusk asks for volunteers. August 13, 1836. Pp. 393, 402. Indian disturbances on western and southwestern boundaries of United States in Texas. August 20, 1836. Pp. 413-414. 4000 Mexican troops in Matamoras and want to revenge the defeat of Santa Anna, five Cherokee chiefs offered their services to the commandant of the Mexican forces. August 27, 1836. Pp. 430, 432. Port of Matamoras blockade not efficient with Mexican and American vessels permitted to pass; Camanches steal 700 horses belonging to Mexican troops. Letter to Mrs. David Crockett from an admirer of her husband in which he returns Crockett’s pocket watch.

$1250.00

ADDRESS BY HON. EDWARD EVERETT, DELIVERED IN FANEUIL HALL, OCT. 19, 1864
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ADDRESS BY HON. EDWARD EVERETT, DELIVERED IN FANEUIL HALL, OCT. 19, 1864

By EVERETT, Edward

[Boston]: [New England Loyal Publication Society], [1864]. Pamphlet. Occasional light foxing. Near Fine. Stitched wraps; 16 pages. INSCRIBED and SIGNED at the top of the title: "Mr. John Andrews/from his ancient school-fellow/Edward Everett." The last two pages contain a statement by the vice-president of the Confederacy: "The Rebellion Inexcusable: Warning and Protest Against It. By Alexdander H. Stephens, made at the capitol of Georgia, January, 1861. Edward Everett--a Unitarian minister, member of both the United States Congress and Senate, and also a governor of Massachusetts--is perhaps best known for his oratory powers. It is he who gave the "other" address at Gettysburg on 19 November 1863. The next day he wrote Lincoln saying, "I should be glad if I could flatter myself that I came as near the central idea of the occasion in two hours as you did in two minutes.

$437.50

A NEW AND COMPLETE COLLECTION OF VOYAGES AND TRAVELS...
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A NEW AND COMPLETE COLLECTION OF VOYAGES AND TRAVELS...

By MOORE, John Hamilton

London: Alexander Hogg, [1785]. First Edition. Hardcover. Occasional marginal notes in ink or pencil, a minor tear here or there but contents very clean. Front board of the first volume detached, others secure. A Near Fine set. Two folio (9" x 13-3/4") volumes bound in contemporary marbled calf leather with gilt rules and decorated spines and matching gilt-lettered morocco spine labels, marbled endpapers. Illustrated with 2 engraved frontispieces, 20 maps including 8 large folding maps, and 80 full-page copper engravings. A well-illustrated account of travels not often found in this complete state.

$3750.00

THIS I REMEMBER
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THIS I REMEMBER

By ROOSEVELT, Eleanor

New York: Harper & Brothers, (1949). First Edition. Hardcover. Bright, close to Fine copy in a Very Good glassine and slipcase. Illustrated with photographs. Copy #678 of 1000 numbered copies SIGNED by the author. This copy with both the original glassine and the slipcase.

$2812.50

A DEFENCE OF THE CONSTITUTIONS OF GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AGAINST THE ATTACK OF M. TURGOT IN HIS LETTER TO DR. PRICE, DATED THE TWENTY-SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 1778
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A DEFENCE OF THE CONSTITUTIONS OF GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AGAINST THE ATTACK OF M. TURGOT IN HIS LETTER TO DR. PRICE, DATED THE TWENTY-SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 1778

By ADAMS, John

Philadelphia: Budd and Bartram, For William Cobbett [volume 1]; H. Sweitzer for William Cobbett [volume 2]; William Young for William Cobbett [volume 3], 1797. Third Edition. Hardcover. Pencil signature on front pastedown of each volume, ink signature "Blair" dated 1798 on the title page of the first volume, the title page of the third volume browned but in general the text is clean and free from foxing. Very Good. Three volumes in early 19th Century half polished black calf with marbled boards and calf corners; 6, xxxiii, [1], [3]-392; [vi], 451; [ii] 528, [36] pages. With the six-page subscriber list in the first volume and the half-title page in the second volume. The portrait frontispiece, found in some copies, is not present here. The Third and final edition, a reprint of the 1794 London edition, which is itself a reprint of the first edition, and the first complete three-volume text published in the United States of this important work in which the second president states the principles on which his new country was founded.

$5000.00

MILITARY COMMISSION. PROCEEDINGS IN THE CASE OF THE UNITED STATES AGAINST DUNCAN G. McRAE, WILLIAM J. TOLAR, DAVID WATKINS, SAMUEL PHILLIPS AND THOMAS POWERS, FOR THE MURDER OF ARCHIBALD BEEBEE AT FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA, ON THE 11th DAY OF FEBRUARY , 1867, TOGETHER WITH THE ARGUMENT OF ED. GRAHAM HAYWOOD, SPECIAL JUDGE ADVOCATE, IN REPLY TO THE SEVERAL ARGUMENTS OF THE COUNSEL FOR THE DEFENCE
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MILITARY COMMISSION. PROCEEDINGS IN THE CASE OF THE UNITED STATES AGAINST DUNCAN G. McRAE, WILLIAM J. TOLAR, DAVID WATKINS, SAMUEL PHILLIPS AND THOMAS POWERS, FOR THE MURDER OF ARCHIBALD BEEBEE AT FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA, ON THE 11th DAY OF FEBRUARY , 1867, TOGETHER WITH THE ARGUMENT OF ED. GRAHAM HAYWOOD, SPECIAL JUDGE ADVOCATE, IN REPLY TO THE SEVERAL ARGUMENTS OF THE COUNSEL FOR THE DEFENCE

By [AFRICAN-AMERICANA] HAYWOOD, Ed. Graham

Raleigh, NC: Robert Avery, 1867. First Edition. Hardcover. Contents toned. Light wear to spine tips. Near Fine. Octavo, publisher's black cloth; [iv], 398 pages. "It appears, from Mr Haywood's argument, that one Archibald Beebee, a colored man, accused of having attempted to commit the crime of rape upon one Elvira Massey, was arrested, and carried to the town hall in Fayetteville, N.C., to undergo a preliminary examination before the magistrates. He was leaving the town hall in charge of the sheriff and his assistants, when he was assaulted by a mob, and, notwithstanding a stout resistance on the part of the of the officers of the law, was brutally murdered. With regard to that part of Mr. Haywood's argument which treats of the evidence against the prisoners, who were a part of the crowd, we need not speak at length here. But the rest of his address, though open to some criticism, on the grounds of diffuseness and unnecessary display of rhetoric, is to be warmly commended, in so far as it is a stand against that lawless spirit of violence which undertakes to punish accused persons on mere suspicion of their guilt, and even when they are in the hands of the officers of the law. Whether the persons tried for this murder of Beebee were innocent or guilty, we, of course, do not know; but we are glad that the trial afforded scope for such a manly advocacy of the supremacy of law over the violence of a mob" (THE AMERICAN LAW REVIEW 1867-1868. Volume II, 1868, pages 542-543).

$437.50

TRAVELS THROUGH THE INTERIOR PARTS OF AMERICA; IN A SERIES OF LETTERS. BY AN OFFICER
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TRAVELS THROUGH THE INTERIOR PARTS OF AMERICA; IN A SERIES OF LETTERS. BY AN OFFICER

By [ANBUREY, Thomas]

London: William Lane, 1791. Second Edition. Hardcover. Short closed tear to the margin of the map not affecting the image. Slight splitting to the hinges but covers very tight with light edgewear. Attractively bound and Near Fine. Two octavo (5-1/2" x 8-1/4") volumes in later full polished calf with gilt rules, a blind-stamped and gilt-decorated spine with contrasting gilt-lettered morocco spine labels; xii, 414; [ii] 492 pages. Lacking the half-title pages but otherwise complete. Illustrated with a large folding map "for the Interior Travels through America, delineating the March of the Army" and 6 plates, 5 of which are folding. Anburey began his travels in Newfoundland in the midst of the Revolutionary War, spending time in Quebec City and Montreal before crossing Lake Champlain to enter the United States as an officer serving in Burgoyne's ill-fated expedition which ended in defeat at Saratoga in 1777. He was later shipped to Charlottesville, Virginia, and his account, written in the form of 79 letters, gives details of his experiences and the manners and customs of the people he meets. Clark I, 192; Howes A-226 (calling for 7 plates, in error); Sabin 1366.

$1875.00

MODERN AND AUTHENTIC SYSTEM OF UNIVERSAL GEOGRAPHY
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MODERN AND AUTHENTIC SYSTEM OF UNIVERSAL GEOGRAPHY

By COOKE, George Alexander

London: Evans & Bourne, 1817 & 1822. First Edition. Hardcover. Some foxing, mostly to the text, the maps largely clean and fresh. Some wear to the binding, the covers strong. Near Fine. Two folio (8-1/2" x 10-1/4") volumes bound in contemporary tree calf leather with contrasting maroon and black morocco spine labels. Illustrated with 2 engraved frontispieces, 52 full-page engraved plates, and 24 folding hand-colored maps, including a fine world map and 3 related to the United States.

$2187.50

THE STATE. ELEMENTS OF HISTORICAL AND PRACTICAL POLITICS
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THE STATE. ELEMENTS OF HISTORICAL AND PRACTICAL POLITICS

By WILSON, Woodrow

Boston/New York/Chicago: D. C. Heath & Co., (1898) but later. New Revised Edition. Hardcover. Near Fine in slightly worn chemise and a Very Good slipcase. Octavo (5-1/4" x 8-1/4") in the publisher's gilt-lettered red cloth; xxxv, [1], 656 pages. SIGNED as President on the front endpaper and dated 24 Oct. 1916. Books autographed by Wilson are rather uncommon, especially this, his first book. Housed in a half green morocco leather slipcase with chemise.

$5625.00

TRENTON FALLS, PICTURESQUE AND DESCRIPTIVE: EMBRACING THE ORIGINAL ESSAY OF JOHN SHERMAN, THE FIRST PROPRIETOR AND RESIDENT
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TRENTON FALLS, PICTURESQUE AND DESCRIPTIVE: EMBRACING THE ORIGINAL ESSAY OF JOHN SHERMAN, THE FIRST PROPRIETOR AND RESIDENT

By WILLIS, N. Parker (Editor)

New York: J. G. Gregory, 1862. Later printing. Hardcover. A few stains here and there; the front endpaper appears to be missing though a blank is present. Light edgewear. Very Good. Decorated cloth. Issued as an advertisement for Trenton Falls, a popular travel destination near Utica, NY. Illustrated with numerous partial- and full-page wood engravings by N. Orr & Co.

$62.50

RIGHTS OF MAN
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RIGHTS OF MAN

By PAINE, Thomas

Lunenberg, VT: Limited Editions Club, 1961. Hardcover. Fine in worn glassine and a Near Fine slipcase with uneven fading to the backstrip. Lynd Ward. Folio (9-1/2" x 12-1/4") bound in red buckram with a vertical center strip of imported hand-made flame-marbled Cockrell paper that extends to the pastedowns; 292 pages. Designed by Roderick Stinehour and printed at the Stinehour Press. Illustrated with 18 full-page two-color lithographs and 18 monochrome text drawings by Lynd Ward. Copy #887 of 2000 SIGNED by the artist on the colophon page.

$112.50

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