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My Experiences with Indians
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My Experiences with Indians

By James, John

Austin; (1925): Gammel's Book Shop. First Edition. Octavo. 147 pages. While his early dealing with various Indian tribes is fascinating, it is time among the Chochtaws in the period beginning in the 1880's that is the heart of his firsthand account. He began teaching at an Indian school named "Stock Bridge Academy". there with 63 children aged 8 to 21, He had to show how the parts of speech worked in English and he taught English songs as well as those of the Sunday School variety such as "On Jordan's Stormy Banks". In the process he acquired a Chochtaw dictionary and Bible as he began to read, write and speak the language. While the missionaries attempted to get them to go through marriage ceremonies, he writes that many who went through the older procedures of the courtship putting a special weed between the breasts of the girl he desired to mate often led to better unions. A marvelous look at an Indian tribe and its customs before they began to disappear at the end of the 19th century. Previous owner's name, light spotting to title page. Bound in black cloth lettered in gilt, spine plain. A very good copy.

$225.00

Leon Gaspard (signed By Frank Waters, Limited to 500 copies)
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Leon Gaspard (signed By Frank Waters, Limited to 500 copies)

By Waters, Frank; Leon Gaspard

Flagstaff: Northland Press, 1964. First Edition. Quarto. Limited to 500 copies signed. 114 pages, with full page paintings of Gaspard work which includes his earliest work in Paris and his major work in Taos, including Taos Fire Dance, Navajo Women, Buffalo Dance at Zuni, and the Corn Dance at Santo Domingo. A very nice copy bound in black cloth lettered in gilt, spine lettering gilt, housed in a black cloth covered slipcase lightly rubbed.

$115.00

Seth Eastman / Pictorial Historian of the Indian
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Seth Eastman / Pictorial Historian of the Indian

By McDermott, John Francis

Norman, OK; (1961): University of Oklahoma Press. First Edition. Small Quarto. 270pp. 100 plates (8 in full color). Includes checklist of works, chronology, and sources. Bound in light brown cloth, spine lettering gilt and dark brown, light rubbing to spine ends and corners. A very good copy in unclipped pictorial dust jacket rubbed along the edges and chipped at foot.

$45.00

Dead End, Signed By Author, Illustrator, Limited to 150 Copies
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Dead End, Signed By Author, Illustrator, Limited to 150 Copies

By Coel, Margaret

Royal Oak, Michigan: Np, 1997. First Edition. Small Quarto. Limited to 150 copies, signed by Margaret Coel and James D. Doss who has written the introduction, and Phil Parks who has produced the four illustrations which are tipped in and finally a handwritten Arapaho word written by Coel for "thou shalt do no murder". While the author is known for her important work Chief Left Hand on the Arapho published by the University of Oklahoma Press in 1982, this is her masterful mystery of a murder that revolves around Father John O'Malley, a missionary priest at St. Francis Mission on the Wyoming reservation and Vicky Holden, a clever Araphao Attorney. OCLC records only one copy at Amhearst College. Bound in red cloth, decorative pastedown to upper board, spine lettering white. A fine copy.

$165.00

The Radiance of My People
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The Radiance of My People

By Gorman, R.C.

(Albuquerque, NM, 1992): Santa Fe Fine Arts. First Edition. Large Oblong Quarto. Signed by the artist. 185(1)pp. illustrated with 170 illustrations of which 127 are in full color. This is Gorman's own story, his autobiography. His reputation rose quickly after he found his own gallery in Taos, New Mexico in 1968. He was the first Navajo ever to have done so. He soon became an international success as well. This volume is lavishly illustrated with both vintage and contemporary photographs along with full page reproductions of his lithographs, paintings and drawings. A near fine copy in a near fine pictorial dust jacket.

$125.00

In the Days of Victorio.  Recollections of a Warms Springs Apache
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In the Days of Victorio. Recollections of a Warms Springs Apache

By Ball, Eve, and James Kaywaykla (narrator)

Tucson, Az; (1970): University of Arizona Press. First Edition. Octavo. 222pp. The last years of Apache freedom, seen through the eyes of a 10 year old survivor of violence. Illustrated with historic photographs. Notes to text. Bibliography (written and oral). Index. Bound in beige cloth lettered in red, spine lettering red, some toning to edges, endpapers are maps. A good copy in pictorial dust jacket with dampstaining to rear panel, rubbing and a few small chips.

$40.00

The Cherokee Indians with Special Reference to Their Relationships with the United States Government
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The Cherokee Indians with Special Reference to Their Relationships with the United States Government

By Parker, Thomas Valentine

New York, (1907): The Grafton Press. Small Octavo. 116 pages. index. From the library of one of the foremost historians of Oklahoma, Grant Foreman's copy, Muskogee Oklahoma, Aug. 11, 1933. The author shows the policies of the Federal Government in its treatment of the Cherokees. While dealing with injustice and dishonesty, he shows how much was a series of blunders by incompetents. He writes of their removal and of the 4,000 that perished. This was one of the most highly intelligent tribes but that was not taken into account when the greed for their land was paramount. Bound in green cloth centrally stamped in gilt, spine lettering gilt, light wear to spine ends and corners, some off-setting to rear endpapers. A very good copy.

$150.00

Art and Indian Individualists
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Art and Indian Individualists

By Monthan, Guy & Doris (ed)

Flagstaff, Arizona; (1975): Northland Press. First Edition. Quarto. 1 of 150 copies of the superb limited edition. Foreword by Lloyd Kiva New. 197pp. This is the publisher's copy (Paul Weaver). Mr. Weaver founded the Northland Press in 1959 and made it the finest press on Indian life in the Southwest. In 1979 the New York Times wrote an article on it entitled: Publishing: When a Small Press Becomes Popular. It notes that he published small print runs as low as 100 copies to no more than 3,000. This copy is signed by 15 of the artists including Fritz Scholder, R.C. Gorman, Allen Houser plus the two editors with the top of the autograph page in calligraphy "Publisher's Copy Paul Weaver." Fine copy in a fine slipcase.

$450.00

The House North of South [Photographs]

By Scholder, Fritz; Randall Crisp

Tucson: Nazrelli Press, 1997. Limited Edition. Quarto. A limited edition of 1000 copies. This copy not numbered but is signed by Scholder. Housed in portfolio cover with 24 unnumbered leaves of black and white plates on heavy card stock. The artists was fascinated with the occult, images of death, and the ideas of that which haunts. These plates are printed in duotone on fine matte-finish stock. A fine collection housed in a fine portfolio.

$125.00

Lights and Shades of Missionary Life Containing Travels, Sketches, Incidents and Missionary Efforts During Nine Years spent in the Region of Lake Superior
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Lights and Shades of Missionary Life Containing Travels, Sketches, Incidents and Missionary Efforts During Nine Years spent in the Region of Lake Superior

By Pitezel, Rev. John H.

Cincinnati: Western Book Concern, 1859. Octavo. 431 pages.[1]pp. ad. While the dream of the founders was that the Indian tribes would forsake their nomadic lifestyle and settle down to farm, Rev. Pitezel's answer was both to buy land to keep them from being located and to get them converted to his gospel message. Still the forces to make the American Indian a semi-white man worked against those who tried to bridge the aggressiveness of the pioneer with the pressure to force the removal of the Indian. The tribes soon realized their enemies were the surveyors who were not protecting them but determining the "legal rights" of those who would soon take their land. Based on his journal which was made in the 1840's, he discusses the conflict in the upper midwest extending to the Great Lakes. Toward the end of the volume, he notes the names and lives of the Indian converts including several who were now pastors and to whom he refers to as "fellow pastors". In one sense, this attempt to follow the gospel by Rev. Pitezel and his followers rose against the racism inherent in early American culture. While there is some toning to the pages with foxing on the engravings, the text is easily read and provides an important firsthand account of the interplay of missions and Indian tribes versus the greed of the American pioneer whose greed for land was as troubling for Pitezel as it had been for George Washington. Bound in brown embossed cloth, spine lettered and decorated in gilt, gilt worn, some chipping to spine ends, corners worn, rear joint cracked and apparently glued, lacks one endpaper from front and rear. A good copy. [Howes D-390].

$150.00

The Ahwahnee Legend: Kos-Soo-Kah and Tee-Hee-Neh; Lost Arrow of the Yosemite
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The Ahwahnee Legend: Kos-Soo-Kah and Tee-Hee-Neh; Lost Arrow of the Yosemite

By Richard Shatka Bear-Step

(Dick Spencer, Inglewood, California; 1947). First Edition. Small Octavo. 30 pages, Illustrated by Carl Roehling. The Photo of Bear-Step was taken by Paul Denver Nelson. An Indian legend from the Miwoks of Yosemite with beautiful illustrations of the perhaps mythical lovers. A very attractive story and one of romance of a great love that was unfulfilled. A fine copy bound in pictorial paper covered boards lettered and decorated in light brown, white and black, in a near fine pictorial dust jacket with a small nick near spine and tiny closed tear. Often the richly colored dust jacket is lacking in this beautiful little book as it was produced very thin making it quite fragile.

$55.00

The Medicine-Man of the American Indian and His Cultural Background
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The Medicine-Man of the American Indian and His Cultural Background

By Corlett, William Thomas

Springfied, IL. (1935): Charles C. Thomas. First Edition. Octavo. First printing. 369 pages, index. Dr. T.W. Corlett became interested in the medicine man in 1879 when he was stationed among the Ojibway Indians of Northern Canada. He uses the term "shaman" for the Indian Medicine man. He writes of the initiation ceremonies of various tribes in both North and South America. He also gives very full accounts of child-bearing, the foods of the Indian and many images of the best shamans. closed tear 213-214. Many photographs of interest. A scarce book bound in maroon cloth, spine lettering gilt, a fine sharp cornered copy in a very nice pictorial dust jacket with fading to spine and along upper edge, small closed edge tear and faint staining to front panel. Very scarce in dust jacket.

$145.00

The Substance of a Journal During a Residence at the Red River Colony, British North America: And Frequent Excursions Among the North West American Indians in the Years 1820, 1821, 1822, 1823
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The Substance of a Journal During a Residence at the Red River Colony, British North America: And Frequent Excursions Among the North West American Indians in the Years 1820, 1821, 1822, 1823

By West, John; Leonard Benton Seeley

London: L.B. Seeley and Son, 1827. Octavo. xvi, 210, [2], [209]-326 pages, 4 leaves of plates including folding map. 2nd Edition, enlarged with a journal of a mission to the Indians of New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, and the Mohawks on the Ouse or Grand River, Upper Canada, 1825, 1826. He was the first Protestant missionary in the Red River community who the Indians called "a black robe" (as opposed to the Roman Catholic missionaries who they called: "long robes". The British fur traders only saw financial gain but he was concerned for improving their condition as well as introducing the gospel. He writes of the sexual unions resulting in children which were abandoned by the fur traders. This edition includes the second journal containing a brief narrative of his mission to the Indians in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia and the remnant of the Mohawk tribe in Upper Canada under the direction of the New England company. Errata sheet is present (p. 327); Inscribed by the author's wife to her niece. Bound in ¾ black morocco over marbled paper covered boards, raised bands gilt, other compartments plain(lettering worn off) covers rubbed, light scattered foxing to map, front hinge weakening, previous owner's name and bookplate along with an embossed stamp.

$550.00

The Last Days of Kit Carson
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The Last Days of Kit Carson

By Tilton, H.R.

Grand Forks ND; (1939): Holt Printing. First Edition. Octavo. 11 pages. Introduction by Usher L. Burdick. While the biography of Kit Carson by John S.C. Abbott is well known, here is a letter by Limited to 250 copies. H.R. Tilton, the physician who attended him during his illnesses compounded by his aneurism of the heart. Here there are insights into his graciousness and his honesty regarding the politicians and warriors he had known. Also at the end, the Secretary of War has added a record of the remarkable military career of Dr. Hilton who served the Army from the beginning of the Civil War to the year 1900. General Miles said he was gallant serving wounded men even as the Nez Perce attacked, a little later he was with those wounded up until the surrender of Chief Joseph. A nice review of a physician who was behind the scenes yet present at major parts of American history. Bound in orange cloth, spine lettering black, original paper wraps preserved and bound in. A fine copy.

$55.00

A Forgotten Pioneer Press of Kansas
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A Forgotten Pioneer Press of Kansas

By McMurtrie, Douglas C.; Albert H. Allen

Chicago: John Calhoun Club, 1930. Limited Edition. Octavo. 30 pages. No. 18 of a limited edition of 160 copies. McMurtrie's prodigious research uncovered the rarest books in many of the United States. As he notes under the most difficult conditions, missionaries to the Indians carried on printing small scriptures, hymn books and even bibliographies on the native languages. Clearly his historical background covers in detail aspects of early printing in the early American west that has often been neglected. Bound in blue cloth, spine lettering gilt. A very nice copy.

$95.00

The Pawnee: Mythology (Part I), All Published
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The Pawnee: Mythology (Part I), All Published

By Dorsey, George A.

Washington, DC: Published By the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1906. 546 pages. Signed by the author on the title page. The author was the Curator of Anthropology at the Field Museum of Natural History. Although labeled "Part I", this work is complete within itself and contains 148 tales of the Kitkehahki, Pitahauirat, and Chaui bands of the Pawnee. The myths include: "True Stories of the Heavenly Beings,", "Tales of Ready-to-Give," "The Origin of Medicine Ceremonies or Power" and "Coyote Tales," among others. When the Pawnee were removed form Nebraska to Oklahoma, their population had been nearly 2,000. This work came from the 500 who survived and remembered their religious observances though they had now become almost totally abandoned. Bound in maroon cloth, spine lettering gilt.

$325.00

True Indian Stories; with Glossary of Indiana Indian Names (signed By J.P. Dunn)
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True Indian Stories; with Glossary of Indiana Indian Names (signed By J.P. Dunn)

By Dunn, Jacob Platt

Indianapolis: Sentinel, 1909. Small Octavo. Signed by the author. 320 [2] pp. ads, [2] leaves of plates, illustrations. Dunn was a careful scholar and hired by the Bureau of American Ethnology to write on the Miami and Potawatomi languages. Contents: Little Turtle, the Death of Witches, why Tecumseh fought, the fall of the prophet William Wells, the defense of Fort Harrison, Pigeon Roost massacre, Walam olum, and many others. Bound in red cloth, spine lettering gilt, only very light shelf wear. A very nice copy.

$300.00

A Narrative of the Indian Wars in New England, from the first Planting thereof in the Year 1607 to the Year 1677.
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A Narrative of the Indian Wars in New England, from the first Planting thereof in the Year 1607 to the Year 1677.

By Hubbard, William

Boston: J. Boyle, 1775. 12mo. Second American edition preceded by the extremely rare 1677 first issue. ix, 288 pages. This work was reissued in this abridged edition just a month after Lexington and includes rhetoric about the undermanned colonists overcoming the powerful Indians. It further notes: "we...have been called to defend our lives and properties against the distant savages." Howes calls it "a corner-stone authority on the subject." It wrongly numbers p. 209 instead of 206 as is called for in all other references. It adds on p. 195 following "A supplement concerning the war with the Pequods in the year 1637. OCLC notes: "the subsequent editions are all copies of that of Boyle, or copies of those from his." S.G. Drake, preface of Hubbard, 1865, p. xii. Bound in a modern 1/4 light brown leather over marbled paper covered baords, renewed endpapers, some toning, finger soiling or spots of foxing to pages. A very nice copy. [ Howes H-756].

$800.00

Indian Outbreaks
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Indian Outbreaks

By Buck, Daniel

Mankato, Minn: Self-Published, 1904. First Edition. Octavo. 284 pages.Illustrated. Daniel Buck was an eyewitness to the trial and the execution of the 38 who were hanged. As a longtime attorney in the state and a member of the Minnsota Supreme Court, he had access to all the facts and represented many who had suffered loss and sought compensation from the Sioux Claims Commission . Despite the title, it was only the U.S.-Dakota War about which he wrote. He concentrated on the events of 1862. One of the most important first hand accounts. Bound in brown cloth, gilt? but rubbed off, wear to spine ends and corners, covers with finger soiling, previous owner's name. A very good copy. [Howes B-914].

$175.00

Two Great Scouts and Their Pawnee Battalion.  The Experience of Frank J. North and Luther H. North, Pioneers of the Great West, 1856-1882, and Their Defence of the Building of the Union Pacific Railroad
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Two Great Scouts and Their Pawnee Battalion. The Experience of Frank J. North and Luther H. North, Pioneers of the Great West, 1856-1882, and Their Defence of the Building of the Union Pacific Railroad

By Grinnell, George Bird

Cleveland, OH: The Arthur H. Clark Co, 1928. First Edition. Octavo. 299pp. Folding map. Text. Index. The far west was the vast country west of the Mississippi river, mostly unexplored with the exception of fur trappers. Travel was by horse or wagon. A horse would travel only three miles a day and survived on prairie grass. A very slow pace to travel. One could travel for weeks or months without seeing people or signs of civilized occupation. Mostly hostile Indians or animals would cross their paths. One of the most useful steps in developing the west was the work by the Pawnee Scouts who knew the land and how to survive the long distances traveled. Bound in red cloth, spine lettering and top edge gilt. A very handsome near fine copy. From the library of Barry Goldwater with his bookplate.

$175.00

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