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Most valuable Philosophy books

Curious what the most valuable and expensive philosophy books are? Below is a small sample of some of the most expensive books that have sold on Biblio.co.uk:


Recent Arrivals in Philosophy

Philosophy

From Plato to Plantinga, from Neo-Confucianism to Nihilism, if you are looking for answers to life's persistent questions you have come to the right place. The books you will find in our philosophy section represent an incredibly broad selection including classics of ancient philosophy, contemporary academic monographs, histories of philosophy, introductions to various philosophical topics and essays on political and economic philosophy. In addition to these scholarly approaches our philosophy section has its share of books for the lay reader that deal with philosophical questions in a refreshingly non-academic way. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.co.uk, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.



Top Sellers in Philosophy

    The Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren

    Another Landmark Book by Rick Warren. You are not an accident. Even before the universe was created, God had you in mind, and he planned you for his purposes. These purposes will extend far beyond the few years you will spend on earth. You were made to last forever! Self-help books often suggest that you try to discover the meaning and purpose of your life by looking within yourself, but Rick Warren says that is the wrong place to start. You must begin with God, your Creator, and his reasons for creating you. You were made by God and for God, and until you understand that, life will never make sense. This book will help you understand why you are alive and God's amazing plan for you---both here and now, and for eternity. Rick Warren will guide you through a personal 40-day spiritual journey that will transform your answer to life's most important question: What on earth am I here for? Knowing God's purpose for creating you will reduce your stress, focus your energy, simplify your decisions, give meaning to your life, and, most importantly, prepare you for eternity. The Purpose Driven Life is a blueprint for Christian living in the 21st century---a lifestyle based on God's eternal purposes, not cultural values. Using over 1,200 scriptural quotes and references, it challenges the conventional definitions of worship, fellowship, discipleship, ministry, and evangelism. In the tradition of Oswald Chambers, Rick Warren offers distilled wisdom on the essence of what life is all about. This is a book of hope and challenge that you will read and re-read, and it will be a classic treasured by generations to come.


    The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz

    The author uses ancient Toltec wisdom to fashion a personal philosophy around these four principles--be impeccable with your word, don't take anything personally, don't make assumptions, and always do your best.


    Structure Of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S Kuhn

    The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, by Thomas Kuhn, is an analysis of the history of science. Its publication was a landmark event in the sociology of knowledge, and popularized the terms paradigm and paradigm shift.


    The Last Lecture by Randy; Zaslow, Jeffrey Pausch

    The Last Lecture is a New York Times best-selling book written by Randy Pausch, a professor of computer science, human-computer interaction, and design at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. The book was born out of a lecture Pausch gave in September 2007, "Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams".


    A Theory Of Justice by John Rawls

    A Theory of Justice is a widely-read book of political philosophy and ethics by John Rawls. It was originally published in 1971 and revised in both 1975 (for the translated editions) and 1999. In A Theory of Justice, Rawls attempts to solve the problem of distributive justice by utilising a variant of the familiar device of the social contract. The resultant theory is known as "Justice as Fairness", from which Rawls derives his two famous principles of justice: the liberty principle and the difference principle.


    Capital by Karl Marx

    A classic of early modernism, Capital combines vivid historical detail with economic analysis to produce a bitter denunciation of mid-Victorian capitalist society. It has also proved to be the most influential work in social science in the twentieth century; Marx did for social science what Darwin had done for biology. Millions of readers this century have treated Capital as a sacred text, subjecting it to as many different interpretations as the bible itself. No mere work of dry economics, Marx's great work depicts the unfolding of industrial capitalism as a tragic drama - with a message which has lost none of its relevance today. 


    The Story Of Philosophy by Will Durant

    The Story of Philosophy: the Lives and Opinions of the Greater Philosophers is a book by Will Durant that profiles several prominent Western philosophers and their ideas, beginning with Plato and on through Friedrich Nietzsche. Durant attempts to show the interconnection of their ideas and how one philosopher's ideas informed the next. There are nine chapters each focused on one philosopher, and two more chapters each containing briefer profiles of three early 20th century philosophers.


    The Power Of Myth by Joseph Campbell

    The noted mythologist discusses the relationship of ancient myths to modern life, including discussions of recent heros, tales of love and marriage, the power of myth, and mythic themes.


    God Is Not Great by Christopher Hitchens

    God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything (2007) is a book-length critique of religion by author and journalist Christopher Hitchens. It was published in the United Kingdom as God Is Not Great: The Case Against Religion. Hitchens contends that organised religion is "[v]iolent, irrational, intolerant, allied to racism, tribalism, and bigotry, invested in ignorance and hostile to free inquiry, contemptuous of women and coercive toward children", and that accordingly it "ought to have a great deal on its conscience. " Hitchens supports his position with a mixture of personal stories, documented historical anecdotes and critical analysis of religious texts. His commentary focuses mainly on the Abrahamic religions, although he also touches on other religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism.


    History Of Philosophy by Frederick Copleston

    Frederick Copleston (1907-1994) grew up in England. He was raised in an Anglican home but converted to Catholicism while a student at Marlborough College. He later became a Jesuit and then pursued a career in academia. He studied and lectured at Heythrop College and wrote an eleven-volume History of Philosophy , which is highly respected. He also spent time teaching at Gregorian University in Rome and, after he retired, lectured at Santa Clara University in California. He was appointed a member of the British Academy in 1970. He is famouse for debating Betrand Russell over the existence of God in a 1948 BBC broadcast.


    The Elements Of Moral Philosophy by James Rachels

    The Elements of Moral Philosophy, by James Rachels and Stuart Rachels, is the best selling textbook in the field of ethics. It may be the best selling book in all of academic philosophy, after such classics as Plato's Republic and Descartes' Meditations. It is organized around the great moral theories--Utilitarianism, the Social Contract Theory, Kantianism, and so on--but it always uses real-life examples to explain what these theories mean. James Rachels wrote the first edition in 1986.


    The Seat Of the Soul by Gary Zukav

    With the same extraordinary skill that he used to demystify scientific abstraction and the new physics, Gary Zukay, the award-winning author of The Dancing Wu Li Masters, here takes us on a brilliant and penetrating exploration of the new phase of evolution we have now entered. With lucidity and elegance, Zukav explains that we are evolving from a species that pursues power based upon the perceptions of the five senses -- external power -- into a species that pursues authentic power -- power that is based upon the perceptions and values of the spirit. He shows how the pursuit of external power has produced our survival-of-the-fittest understanding of evolution, generated conflict between lovers, communities, and superpowers, and brought us to the edge of destruction. Using his scientist's eye and philosopher's heart, Zukav shows how infusing the activities of life with reverence, compassion, and trust makes them come alive with meaning and purpose. He illustrates how the emerging values of the spirit are changing marriages into spiritual partnerships, psychology into spiritual psychology, and transforming our everyday lives. The Seat of the Soul describes the remarkable journey to the spirit that each of us is on.


    The 48 Laws Of Power by Robert Greene

    Before Mastery, came The 48 Laws of Power —the New York Times bestseller that started it all   Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, The 48 Laws of Power is the definitive manual for anyone interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control. In the book that People magazine proclaimed “beguiling” and “fascinating,” Robert Greene and Joost Elffers have distilled three thousand years of the history of power into 48 essential laws by drawing from the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and Carl Von Clausewitz and also from the lives of figures ranging from Henry Kissinger to P.T. Barnum.   Some laws teach the need for prudence (“Law 1: Never Outshine the Master”), others teach the value of confidence (“Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness”), and many recommend absolute self-preservation (“Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally”). Every law, though, has one thing in common: an interest in total domination. In a bold and arresting two-color package, The 48 Laws of Power is ideal whether your aim is conquest, self-defense, or simply to understand the rules of the game.


    Discipline & Punish by Michel Foucault

    Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison is a book written by the philosopher Michel Foucault. Originally published in 1975 in France under the title Surveiller et punir: Naissance de la Prison, it was translated into English in 1977. It is an examination of the social and theoretical mechanisms behind the massive changes that occurred in western penal systems during the modern age. It focuses on historical documents from France, but the issues it examines are relevant to every modern western society. It is considered a seminal work, and has influenced many theorists and artists. Foucault challenges the commonly accepted idea that the prison became the consistent form of punishment due to humanitarian concerns of reformists, although he does not deny those. He does so by meticulously tracing out the shifts in culture that led to the prison's dominance, focusing on the body and questions of power. Prison is a form used by the "disciplines", a new technological power, which can also be found, according to Foucault, in schools, hospitals, military barracks, etc. The main ideas of Discipline and Punish can be grouped according to its four parts: torture, punishment, discipline and prison.


    The Seven Spiritual Laws Of Success by Deepak Chopra

    This is a book you will cherish for a lifetime, for within its pages Deepak Chopra offers a life-altering perspective on the attainment of success. Filled with timeless wisdom, the essence of his teachings is distilled into seven simple, yet powerful principles that can easily be applied to create success and abundance in all areas of your life. 


    A Concise Introduction To Logic by Patrick J Hurley

    Includes index.


    Being and Nothingness by Jean-Paul Sartre



    The Denial Of Death by Ernest Becker



    Introduction To Logic by Irving M ; Cohen, Carl Copi



Philosophy Books & Ephemera


    A History Of Western Philosophy by Russell, Bertrand

    Originally published: London : George Allen & Unwin, 1946. Includes bibliographical references and index.


    Being and Time by Heidegger, Martin

    Being and Time is a book by German philosopher Martin Heidegger. Although written quickly, and despite the fact that Heidegger never completed the project outlined in the introduction, it remains his most important work and has profoundly influenced 20th-century philosophy, particularly existentialism, hermeneutics and deconstruction.


    Philosophical Investigations by Wittgenstein, Ludwig

    Philosophical Investigations (Philosophische Untersuchungen) is, along with the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, one of the two most influential works by the 20th-century philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. In it, Wittgenstein discusses numerous problems and puzzles in the fields of semantics, logic, philosophy of mathematics, and the philosophy of mind. He puts forth the view that conceptual confusions surrounding language use are at the root of most philosophical problems, contradicting or discarding much of that which was argued in his earlier work, the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. Within the Anglo-American tradition, the book is considered by many as being one of the most important philosophical works of the 20th century, and it continues to influence contemporary philosophers, especially those studying mind and language.


    Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus by Wittgenstein, Ludwig

    Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus is the only book-length philosophical work published by the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein during his lifetime. He wrote it as a soldier and a prisoner of war during World War I. First published in German in 1921 as Logisch-Philosophische Abhandlung, it is now widely considered one of the most important philosophical works of the twentieth century. The Latin title was originally suggested by G. E. Moore, and is an homage to Tractatus Theologico-Politicus by Benedictus Spinoza. Wittgenstein later refuted many of the ideas contained in the Tractatus in his later works, notably the posthumously published Philosophical Investigations. Tractatus uses a notoriously austere and succinct literary style. Though Wittgenstein's later works were less austere, and contained notably different philosophical ideas, they retained the same basic writing style of short sentences or paragraphs rather than narrative exposition. It has also been noted that Tractatus contains almost no arguments as such; merely declarative statements which are meant to be self-evident. The slim volume (fewer than eighty pages) comprises a system of short statements, numbered 1, 1.1, 1.11, 1.12, etc. , through to 7, intended to be such that 1.1 is a comment on or elaboration of 1, 1.11 and 1.12 comments on 1.1, and so forth. It is an ambitious project to identify the relationship between language and reality and to define the limits of science. Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus was influential chiefly amongst the logical positivists of the Vienna Circle, such as Rudolf Carnap and Friedrich Waismann. It is more difficult to determine the extent of the influence of the ideas of the Tractatus on Bertrand Russell, since it is frequently hard to determine who is influencing whom, but Russell begins his article "The Philosophy of Logical Atomism", by presenting it as a working out of ideas that he had learnt from Wittgenstein.


    An Essay Concerning Human Understanding by Locke, John

    An Essay Concerning Human Understanding is one of John Locke's two most famous works, the other being his Second Treatise on Civil Government. First appearing in 1690, the essay concerns the foundation of human knowledge and understanding. He describes the mind at birth as a blank slate (tabula rasa, although he did not use those actual words) filled later through experience. The essay was one of the principal sources of empiricism in modern philosophy, and influenced many enlightenment philosophers, such as David Hume and Bishop Berkeley. A 17th century Latin translation Philosophus Autodidactus of the Arabic Arabic philosophical novel Hayy ibn Yaqzan by the 12th century Andalusian-Islamic philosopher and novelist Ibn Tufail (known as "Abubacer" or "Ebn Tophail" in the West) had an influence on John Locke's formulation of tabula rasa in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Ibn Tufail demonstrated the theory of tabula rasa as a thought experiment through his Arabic philosophical novel novel Hayy ibn Yaqzan in which he depicted the development of the mind of a feral child "from a tabula rasa to that of an adult, in complete isolation from society" on a desert island, through experience alone. Book II of the Essay sets out Locke's theory of ideas, including his distinction between passively acquired simple ideas, such as "red," "sweet," "round," etc. , and actively built complex ideas, such as numbers, causes and effects, abstract ideas, ideas of substances, identity, and diversity. Locke also distinguishes between the truly existing primary qualities of bodies, like shape, motion and the arrangement of minute particles, and the secondary qualities that are "powers to produce various sensations in us" such as "red" and "sweet. " These secondary qualities, Locke claims, are dependent on the primary qualities. He also offers a theory of personal identity, offering a largely psychological criterion. Book III is concerned with language, and Book IV with knowledge, including intuition, mathematics, moral philosophy, natural philosophy, faith, and opinion.


    Existentialism and Human Emotions by Sartre, Jean-Paul

    In this provocative philosophical analysis, Sartre refutes the idea that existentialism drains meaning from human life, by claiming that the philosophy instead gives man total freedom to achieve his own significance. Sartre’s  Existentialism and Human Emotions  is a stirring defense of existentialist thought, which argues that “existence precedes essence.” While attacks on existentialism claim that the philosophy leads to a kind of nihilistic gloom, Sartre contends that instead existentialism is the only path toward giving man meaning. Sartre ultimately argues that by the very absence of “a priori meaning,” an individual can discover and shape his or her own significance and place in the world. Sartre turns the typical nihilistic definition of existentialism on its head in this optimistic take on his best-known theory. 


    The Consolations Of Philosophy by De Botton, Alain

    Alain de Botton is the author of On Love, The Romantic Movement, Kiss and Tell , and How Proust Can Change Your Life (available in paperback from Vintage Books). His work has been translated into twenty languages. He lives in Washington, D.C., and London, where he is a director of the Graduate Philosophy Program at London University.


    Memories Of Teilhard De Chardin by De Terra, Helmut



    Metamagical Themas by Hofstadter, Douglas R



    Ethics by Nowell-Smith, P H



    Philosophy by Hooper, Sydney E



    The Foucault Reader by Foucault, Michel



    Little Journeys To the Homes Of Great Philosophers by Hubbard, Elbert



    ManS Place In Nature by Chardin, Pierre Teilhard De



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